Fey Campaign; first adventure

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So for those of you who recall my last thread, we decided that my next campaign would take my characters into a world of Fey and Devil plots in an attempt to free the Feywild from an evil that threatens to enslave them all into the power of the Nine Hells. The party is just beginning their final adventure in our current undead campaign, and I've got the itch to start writing for the new one.

Already I've hit my first big crossroad.

I've always used Fey as supplementary inclusions in past campaigns, but I've never really dealt with them as the primary focus of a campaign's overarching theme. One of the things I always do is to have the first adventure of a new campaign focus on the primary theme before I branch off into other sub-themes that have story relevance. This most recent campaign, for example, began with a trip to an ancient tomb where goblins under the command of an undead master had kidnapped prisoners. The tomb included quite a few undead monsters (being an undead campaign), and culminated with the boss undead leading an attack on the town after they rescued the prisoners. The goblins set the stage to include a goblinoid sub-plot, as the BBEG for the campaign had ties with the current lord of all goblinoids in my world.

In my past two 4e campaigns, the first adventures have used the atypical "scrubs" of the game (goblins and kobolds), so naturally I want to avoid repeating myself as much as I can, but I'm not sure what to go about doing that paints the "first adventurer" feel using Fey creatures. So naturally, I came here for more advice.

What sort of Fey related creatures make for a good starting level enemy for a campaign, and what sort of plot hooks do you think I should use to build a good opening adventure? The game is homebrew, using mostly original mythology, locations and characters, but I can always work established locations and characters in through name changing or simply adding them to the history with slight revisions where needed. Any suggestion is welcome, cause right now, I've got a fat lot of nothing XD

Thanks again folks
Give some thoughts to the fey influence to determine your NPCs and towns first. Remember, if the game is focused on the feywild, you might have misfit cities of fey (and others) rules by a demanding eldarin warlord, a fairie with enournous power (like Shakespeare's Oberon), or it might be traditional PHB races villages in a wild, forest side landscape.

For feywild locations and cities, think about who runs it. Is it a massive treant and everyone lives in his shadow? He could be hollowed out so the city is sprawling upward and outward through his mighty branches. When he's angry, the city shakes and people fall. Is the leader instead a pixie? The city could be a massive village of misfits and outcasts of every race and origin, not just fey, on the edge of a river that flows from a hundred worlds. The only rule (they told you about) was respect the fey. If the leader is instead eladrin, it could be marble palaces with teleportation circles to the 9 kingdoms, courtiers and masquerade balls, and everyone thinks they're better than you.

Remember, for a faerie or fey adventure, something about the city itself should be glamourous and magical, and so should the people who run it. The kings asks for heroes to steal win bottles from dragons rather than bringing back their heads. Put a twist on every important npc and quest. Try using Curses (Book of Vile Darkness and elsewhere).

Now think of the monsters. Its sad that you feel tapped out on goblins, because they fit well into the feywild mythology. "We must not look at goblin men, we must not buy their fruits / who knows upon what soil they fed their hungry, thirsty roots." Be new with them, if you use them. Have them grow from large viny pods (like in Warhammer), or crawl from the dirt to serve evil spellcasters when they spill fey blood in their rituals.

Xivorts (MM3) are low level fey creatures that are evil, and very much like goblins. Spriggans (MM2) are higher level, sort of super goblins with clearly fey powers and magic. In 2e dnd, they could change from giants to gnomes and back again - they had two sizes! Twig Blights - think treant dogs (Monster Vault: TTTNV) - are easily corruptable by evil of any kind. Phase Spiders (Dragon 179) can be found in feywild dungeons and wilderness with any other spide. Other higher level creatures, like Blighted Treants and such, work well as monsters.

For a boss, you want something devil, or working for them. An eladrin prince returns to a ruined castle after a thousand years. He begins to hand out fey powers to all newcomers. He grants minor wishes in exchange for fealty - swearing an oath to serve him for someday (just one day). He makes warlocks, turns bored pixies into people for a year, and makes barmaids fall in love with the town drunk. Whatever the heart desires, he has something for you. Really though, he's a tiefling warlock serving devils. He's disguised as an eladrin prince to fool people into trusting his oaths and promises. Meanwhile, each oath signs another conscript to a coming war. He has his unwitting servants perform secret atrocities - murders, desecration of magic pools, poisoning of treants - anything to erode his enemies power, because he knows something big is coming. When the powers that be discover someone doing horrible things, all subtle signs point to the suspicious return of the prince after his thousand year vacation.

A newly returned eladrin prince must be welcomed and treated with respect! Hiding behind the disguise, he has great social power. Fey of all kinds would shun a hero for attacking a prince.

How did the heroes catch his scent? Were they sent to welcome him back from a thousand year slumber when they notice signs of ill in his well-over grown land? Did he send them to 'deal' with some other fey when they realized they were killing the good guys? Can the heroes prove he's evil? Is he gathering fey blood to summon someone much worse? Can other devils disguise themselves as fey so easily?

One the topic of NPCs with twists, you can also think of smaller adventures. Perhaps a kindly old hermit witch is being hunted by ugly and foul adventurers from some church. Is she evil, using hexes and poisons on villagers? Is she good, giving healing herbs and casting divinations? Could she be both? One by day, one by night? Maybe she has an identical twin sister with the exact same name that she doesn't know about.

You could have a friendly barmaid who flirst with the heroes, asking for tales of adventure and magic, who actually a succubus spying for her dark masters. Maybe she tries to drain the heroes' live on the first night - maybe she finds them in other towns, wearing a new face each time.

A local dryad has lost her pet pixie. She promises a divination spell, or a single kiss, to anyone who find the pixie and stuffs him back in the bottle.

For a delve adventure, I ran a party lost in the feywild. The story began while they were chasing a dragon and fell through his portal. The pixie guide in their bottle slipped out when they hit the dirt, arriving in the feywild. First they found him, beat up his pixie friends, and stuffed Ixel Thistle back in the pottle. They got him to tell them the way out, which he didn't know. He lead them to a circle of standing stones guarded by a knight on a unicorn.

"The stones of truth" would answer any question posed to them, but the knight guards them forever of the last order of a dead fey lord. The heroes had to either distract the night with conversation while someone snuck in, or kill him. No one spoke elven, so when the unicorn tried to surrender, they killed him too. I made everyone lose 2 healing surges as, despite their alignment, something about the sight of a dead unicorn tore at their very soul.

I might have more ideas, but I could write for a long time. Let me know what you think - if you wanted a full adventure instead, or more one offs, let me know. Also, find the Wrath of the River King adventure (by some guys called Open Design). It has some fey courts, kings, queens, witches, portals, etc. Its an adventure for level 4 to 6 that set the tone quite nicely for a fey game. No devils though.
I just remembered some wonderful pieces from Chris Perkins' adventures. In one, he had an evil wizard who had been cursed so they he could never see fey. They were invisible to him. In another, he had a skill challenge with a magic face that started with a riddle and ended with the heroes grilling him for more information about the dungeon. Cheeky moments with a pinch of magic - offbeat compared to normal adventures. There were no talking faces in Keep on the Shadowfel.
Now think of the monsters. Its sad that you feel tapped out on goblins, because they fit well into the feywild mythology. "We must not look at goblin men, we must not buy their fruits / who knows upon what soil they fed their hungry, thirsty roots." Be new with them, if you use them. Have them grow from large viny pods (like in Warhammer), or crawl from the dirt to serve evil spellcasters when they spill fey blood in their rituals.



Well, it does inspire for totally new creatures, but such a thing I think I'll save for later. Really scare the pants off my players when what they think are newborn goblins turn out to be something completely different, and dangerous.

In any case, I must admit, a lot of the subjects do inspire for later adventures (I am in love with the colossal Treant housing a Fey city, so that's definitely going to become key later in the campaign), but the adventure starts in the natural world and moves into the Feywild. I don't want so much a full adventure, more ideas for something that throws sudden bursts of Feywild flavor at the PCs after they've spent so much time in the world of men. Entering the Feywild probably won't happen until later heroic/early paragon for the campaign, so I'd like to focus on how to make the normal world give off the occasional Fey flavoring.

One thing I'd like to do is to avoid using Elves and Drow for this. In my homebrew, Elves are not from the Feywild, rather they are native to the natural world. Drow, in similar fashion, come from the Shadowfell.

The adventurer begins and takes place up until the enter the Feywild on a continent that combines wilderness aspects of both south america and africa, if that helps to inspire any ideas. Nothing as to the type of village the PCs start in, but I'm always open to suggestions.

Thanks a bunch

I've brewed up a monster for my homebrew campaign that you might be able to use: Redcaps. In my campaign setting redcaps are a kind of goblin (all goblins are nasty feywild critters, but there are many different kinds of them), redcaps are goblins addicted to dark magic; necromancy, demonology, voodoo, blood magic etc., redcaps need exposure to arcane energy to survive, the color of their red caps are an indicator of their magical power, the deeper red the cap becomes the more exposed a redcap is to arcane magic and the more dangerous it becomes.

In my campaign setting demons are extremely dangerous, even the pettiest of demons/devils are paragon tier foes and thus I remade redcaps into that version to make more 'demonic themed' heroic tier monsters. However being creatures connected to both feywild and demonology they might fit quite well into your campaign.

If you're interested I can post up some of my homebrew redcap monsters, however they'll need some reworking to fit into a standard 4 ed campaign as my campaigns are heavily houseruled.
Start in a village / town / area with heavy superstitions about fey creatures. Old ladies hang bag of herbs over their front door. Everyone has little quirks like throwing salt over their shoulder. Make the local churches and lords play against this, insisting its peasant superstition. You could even have hermit NPCs that few people talk about, because they're practicing minor witchcraft.

Throw in a magic pond in the wilderness that cures disease. Have strange lights (will-o-wisps or faeries, or druids) seen in the forest always. Odd noises, like whistling or singing, also help. If you want a splash of fey flavor without having fey monsters or the fey wild, the devil is in the details.

When you starting adding in more, like forgotten statues that smile when you leave flowers at their base, or actual factual brownie villages and disappearing lake maidens, the players will feel like they've rooted out something bigger.

Without suggesting monsters, I can only really suggest you start small, and build steam. Don't even show them a fey creature (aside from elves and eladrin, and maybe gnomes) until they've decided whether or not they believe in them, but always hint at it.

Good fey adventures published or done at home always seem to be about occult curses, half-true superstitions, sadly forgotten fey patrons, witches snatching babies, hidden gnome and brownie villages, pixies partying at night, and the all powerful will of unstoppable fey-kings like Oberon.

I'm honestly a little stumped myself on exactly what to use in my own game. You could probably tell from my last post that my issue is overdrawing the world. Too much stuff to fast. Good for paragon adventures, but not great introductions. Like you, I wanted the adventures to be fey themed but not always in the feywild, and I have the same start-up issue. Guess I'll be taking my own advice - starting small with hints of fey before rolling out the red carpet and putting Fantasia on the tele.

Best of luck, mate. I hope you fair better than me.

If you're interested I can post up some of my homebrew redcap monsters, however they'll need some reworking to fit into a standard 4 ed campaign as my campaigns are heavily houseruled.



Nah. I'm fairly adapt at monster building myself, so just the idea will be enough. Thank you for it, btw. I'm totally gonna use it late heroic XD

Start in a village / town / area with heavy superstitions about fey creatures. Old ladies hang bag of herbs over their front door. Everyone has little quirks like throwing salt over their shoulder. Make the local churches and lords play against this, insisting its peasant superstition. You could even have hermit NPCs that few people talk about, because they're practicing minor witchcraft.

Throw in a magic pond in the wilderness that cures disease. Have strange lights (will-o-wisps or faeries, or druids) seen in the forest always. Odd noises, like whistling or singing, also help. If you want a splash of fey flavor without having fey monsters or the fey wild, the devil is in the details.

When you starting adding in more, like forgotten statues that smile when you leave flowers at their base, or actual factual brownie villages and disappearing lake maidens, the players will feel like they've rooted out something bigger.

Without suggesting monsters, I can only really suggest you start small, and build steam. Don't even show them a fey creature (aside from elves and eladrin, and maybe gnomes) until they've decided whether or not they believe in them, but always hint at it.

Good fey adventures published or done at home always seem to be about occult curses, half-true superstitions, sadly forgotten fey patrons, witches snatching babies, hidden gnome and brownie villages, pixies partying at night, and the all powerful will of unstoppable fey-kings like Oberon.



Funny thing is, the primary villian of the campaign IS Oberon XD

This does actually help inspire ideas. I think I'll start with trouble popping up from the Underdark. Maybe something with Myconids, and see where inspiration takes me from there. Thanks

Any other suggestions are still welcome