Story points?

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There are systems that do story points. I've even tacked them onto my PF game. The question here isn't what kind of story points but simply if you support the idea of some kind of story points.

For definition, I'm calling story points some sort of resource that the player can expend to add some degree of authorship into the game. "I spend a story point. This bartender is actually my old friend for Far Hope." 

I would've liked this to be a poll. Is that option turned off or can I just not figure it out? 
I do the same kind of thing in my game, I use drama cards.

BTW I think polls are not allowed on these boards. 

Play whatever the **** you want. Never Point a loaded party at a plot you are not willing to shoot. Arcane Rhetoric. My Blog.

It's sort of similar to my proposed Karma system. However, I prefer Karma in that it doesn't actually change the game world, it just allows the character to have more control upon it.
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Reflavoring: the change of flavor without changing any mechanical part of the game, no matter how small, in order to fit the mechanics to an otherwise unsupported concept. Retexturing: the change of flavor (with at most minor mechanical adaptations) in order to effortlessly create support for a concept without inventing anything new. Houseruling: the change, either minor or major, of the mechanics in order to better reflect a certain aspect of the game, including adapting the rules to fit an otherwise unsupported concept. Homebrewing: the complete invention of something new that fits within the system in order to reflect an unsupported concept.
Ideas for 5E
Why a resource? If a player comes up with an interesting idea like the bartender being an old friend, you should just go with it.

Then again, if you make it a resource, players may be inclined to think of it as something they can use, rather than ignore the possibility altogether. Ever since DMG2, I've always told my players that they have narrative control of the world where it doesn't conflict too much with my nefarious schemes as a DM, and they rarely if ever take me up on it.
I like the idea as an optional mechanic. It doesn't suit some types of campaigns, such as dungeon crawls and detective campaigns, so I don't think it should be a core mechanic. For campaigns suited to it, such a sandbox worlds and role playing oriented campaigns, it can be a good addition to the game.

Dungeon crawl campaigns and other role playing light campaigns obviously have little use for story manipulation mechanics. It's more subtle for detective campaigns, but the problem there is that story ponts will too often reveal that something is important when a plot point is rejected.

Jay

I was just asking a yay or nay, but heck with it. I'm going to share how I do story points. You can split this into 2 parts if you like the one but not the other. First, everyone gets a Super Secret Background. That is done as the first step in character creation. The idea, of course, is that the background will slowly come to light as the game progresses. Secrets that stay secret might as well not be there. Do you remember the secret that was never revealed in the Princess Bride? Of course not, it wasn't revealed. Every player starts with 20 story points. I use poker chips. Everyone has the same basic ability for story points. What it boils down to is if there is something that hasn't already been set, then instead of asking the DM you can spend a story point to tell the DM. Is there a chandelier I can swing from? If I jump from this window, is there something softer I can land on? Would it be okay if this was I guy I knew from the army? For each of those questions, I just point to their story points and kinda shrug. Then, for every Super Secret Background, there is a much more powerful thing you can do for the cost of 5 story points. For the Prince in Exile background, you can spend 5 points and the person you are talking to recognizes you and is one of the subjects who still follows you in secret. They will do what they can to help you if doesn't expose them or you.

To gain story points, we all vote for who did the best roleplaying that game. They get one. Then the person other than that who spent the most points that game gets one back. Then there are the Misfortunes. At some point I might just say, "Who is willing to have a Misfortune for 5 story points?" and ask for a show of hands. For my play style, I encourage the players to discuss before voting but I can see other play styles going for blind votes. If only one raises their hand, they get the Misfortune and the 5 story points. If either nobody raises their hand or more than one does, I offer it again at 4 story points and so on until somebody bites. If nobody has raised their hand by the time it gets to zero, it becomes, "Who is willing to pay a story point to avoid Misfortune?" If everyone is willing to pay, I up the cost. If, for whatever reason, nobody ever bites, they all get a Misfortune. A Misfortune is, in reality, not that serious. In combat, it might be the archery-focused character losing his quiver of arrows. He has to find another way to contribute, but can recover/make arrows after this combat. Out of combat, I'll look over your character and pull something from either your public or private background. In one game, the lady with the fighter had a son squired to a knight in her background. Well, he was on trial for murder in the town the group just walked into. So the next couple sessions of the adventure wrote themselves.

Dungeon crawl campaigns and other role playing light campaigns obviously have little use for story manipulation mechanics.

Jay




Not necessarily. To borrow from The Dresden Files, you could use Story Points to "suddenly" have Thieves Tools in your pack that your sister gave you before you entered the dungeon, or to say that a torch dies out where you want to hide, or to say that an owlbear might suddenly get a leg cramp and grant CA for an attack. Anything a player might imagine. Likewise, a DM might offer a player a story point to do something in character but not really to the party's compete benefit. A thief might have to spend a standard action prying a gem out of a statue in the middle of the fight, or a fighter might have to engage an ogre to prove his might to himself, when the necromancer in the back is the real threat.

This is rife for the "modular" approach. Not for the basic game for sure, but defintely an add on that could be plugged in to a game where the players and DM would enjoy it.

Dungeon crawl campaigns and other role playing light campaigns obviously have little use for story manipulation mechanics.

Jay




Not necessarily. To borrow from The Dresden Files, you could use Story Points to "suddenly" have Thieves Tools in your pack that your sister gave you before you entered the dungeon, or to say that a torch dies out where you want to hide, or to say that an owlbear might suddenly get a leg cramp and grant CA for an attack. Anything a player might imagine. Likewise, a DM might offer a player a story point to do something in character but not really to the party's compete benefit. A thief might have to spend a standard action prying a gem out of a statue in the middle of the fight, or a fighter might have to engage an ogre to prove his might to himself, when the necromancer in the back is the real threat.

This is rife for the "modular" approach. Not for the basic gam for sure, but defintely an add on that could be plugged in to a game where the players and DM would enjoy it.



This sounds a lot more like my Karma system than like Numbed's story points though. I'm not sure I'd want story points in the game, though, whereas of course I'd love to have the Karma system.
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Reflavoring: the change of flavor without changing any mechanical part of the game, no matter how small, in order to fit the mechanics to an otherwise unsupported concept. Retexturing: the change of flavor (with at most minor mechanical adaptations) in order to effortlessly create support for a concept without inventing anything new. Houseruling: the change, either minor or major, of the mechanics in order to better reflect a certain aspect of the game, including adapting the rules to fit an otherwise unsupported concept. Homebrewing: the complete invention of something new that fits within the system in order to reflect an unsupported concept.
Ideas for 5E
I like this as an idea for an add on system. I may have to write up house rules for my game based on this. While it would not work as a core mechanic, i would love to see something similar fleshed out in a supplement book.
i actually do something similar. i'm toying with the idea of making story points a resource that refreshes on taking an extended rest and awarding a number = CHA modifier.

        I often give my players a story award for achieving some game objective usually a flat amount of xp if you save the town blacksmith from the horde of rabid Ork’s you might get 1000xp story award I think it’s a good idea.


 

Why a resource? If a player comes up with an interesting idea like the bartender being an old friend, you should just go with it.

Then again, if you make it a resource, players may be inclined to think of it as something they can use, rather than ignore the possibility altogether. Ever since DMG2, I've always told my players that they have narrative control of the world where it doesn't conflict too much with my nefarious schemes as a DM, and they rarely if ever take me up on it.



Concurrence on both paragraphs.
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