Question regarding deities.

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So I am a fairly new dm, I have run the red box and DM kit. I now venture forth and am creating my own campaign.  I am also by the way fairly new to the D&D mythos and want to build my story with in it and not change it. 1 question about the deities, I have 2 human cities rivaling eachother one is more art and creativity and masonary skills and such, while the other is more rigid and traditional and both are human cities. So my question is, in the general D&D mythos, would the citizens of each city tend to worship Pelor being he is the human god or would they tend to worship gods based on their philosophies. Any suggestions?? It is sort of a big chunk of the cities history for my purposes that is missing. Anyway thanks any advice is appreaciated. 
Given that the default for D&D is polytheistic societies, I would have each town worship several gods.  Have each town value different gods to give them a different feel.

So perhaps while both of them have temples dedicated to Pelor (because he is the human god), neither one puts him in the most elevated position. 

The first town (art/creativity/masonry) could primarily worship Corellon (god of the arts as well as spring, beauty, and the arcane arts) and Moradin (god of creation and artisans).  This would also be an interesting mix that would stand out, because these are the main gods of the elves and dwarves respectively (and thus separate in most campaigns I think).  You could thus think about whether there was something deeper behind this (such as an ancient alliance between elves and dwarves that took place in the city) or if it simply represented the atitudes and interests of the citizens.

The second town (rigid/traditional) might primarily worship Bahamut (god of justice, protection, nobility, and honor) and Erathis (god of civilization and laws).

You might also think about how each town feels toward the various other gods, and perhaps even the evil gods.  Check out pages 20-23 in the PHB and pages 162-163 in the DMG for more information.
The default assumption is that all of the gods in the pantheon have some human worshippers.  Of all the races in the standard setting, humans are the most diverse and individual - that's why they're more customizable than other races.  As such, there's no patron diety of humanity itself.


If you're using published adventure material, it assumes that most cities have temples and shrines to individual gods, in greater or lesser variety depending on the size and variety of their populations.  Some gods will have dedicated spiritual leaders in the community, and those will tend to have actual temples, while the gods whose followers are too few to justify the presence of ordained agents might still have shrines at which people can come together and pray to them.  Some of the gods embody concepts that aren't encouraged in a city, and their shrines and temples will either be absent from the city, or hidden away so that their worshippers can meet in secret.

Another default assumption is that there are no officially recognized heads of faith.  Pelor doesn't have a pope, for instance, and each city's temple is its own ultimate authority, free to develop its own canon and liturgy and law within the confines of local law.  That means you could have two cities whose clergies are relatively integrated and of one mind when it comes to matters of faith, or you could have rival temples of the same god who embody different aspects of those gods and preach different doctrines, even to the point of decrying one another as heretical sects.  Since it's the rites of investiture that grant divine spellcasters their power and not the gods themselves, two temples of the same god can come into violent conflict, with clerics and paladins and so forth using their divine powers against one another.


What you do with that depens on what sort of campaign you want to play, and how influential you want the religions to be in your settings.  A city famed for its beautiful architecture might have a fantastically large temple dedicated to Erathis, Corellon and Moradin that celebrates art and building and society coming together.  There might also be a temple of Pelor that is less grand, but has a larger and more devout following among the commoners.  Kord might not have much more than a couple of shrines inside the City Watch house and the barracks without so much as a chaplain, but the diety himself might be prayed to fervently and  informally by every athlete and fighting man and woman in the city.  The city might have a vast library with a chapel of Ioun at its heart, with its priests serving as librarians and scribes and seekers of lost knowledge abroad, and Vecna might have a secret temple in the sewers where the city's downtrodden worship him in secret.  Tiamat might not be worshipped openly, but the city's wealthiest people might make silent prayers to her.
"When Friday comes, we'll all call rats fish." D&D Outsider
In general, all of the gods will have some degree of recognition, but the emphasis will differ - not just in terms of which gods' shrines see the most activity, but also which aspects of each god are emphasized in their worship.

The most important thing to remember is that, even though some of them work at cross-purposes, gods (and the priesthoods that serve them) in the default setting are a collective, rather than being a bunch of mini-monotheisms competing to proclaim their one truth above all others.
I definatelle agree with Kaganfindel
One of they ways I plan on doing this in any game I run is by using essentials and PHB divine classes.
The old school traditionalists are warpreists, chaveliers and blackgaurds with their linier traditions that all look mostly alike.
The more modern progressive open minded followers are classic clerics and paladins who can bring a mix of abillities.
The sea looks at the stabillity of the mountian and sighs. The mountian watches the freedom of the sea and cries.
Given that the default for D&D is polytheistic societies, I would have each town worship several gods.  Have each town value different gods to give them a different feel.

So perhaps while both of them have temples dedicated to Pelor (because he is the human god), neither one puts him in the most elevated position. 

The first town (art/creativity/masonry) could primarily worship Corellon (god of the arts as well as spring, beauty, and the arcane arts) and Moradin (god of creation and artisans).  This would also be an interesting mix that would stand out, because these are the main gods of the elves and dwarves respectively (and thus separate in most campaigns I think).  You could thus think about whether there was something deeper behind this (such as an ancient alliance between elves and dwarves that took place in the city) or if it simply represented the atitudes and interests of the citizens.

The second town (rigid/traditional) might primarily worship Bahamut (god of justice, protection, nobility, and honor) and Erathis (god of civilization and laws).

You might also think about how each town feels toward the various other gods, and perhaps even the evil gods.  Check out pages 20-23 in the PHB and pages 162-163 in the DMG for more information.

Wow... incredible insight. Seriously man thank you for the advice, I love the idea of an ancient alliance. Its such a simple way to give a much deeper history to the place. Thanks a lot.
What a great comunity, Thank you everyone for adding so much insight, you have my players thanks as well.
There is a lot of good advice here.  The one thing that I did not see is this is you and your players story, so feel free to change or re-interpret any and all rules and story elements to fit your game.
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