An old gamer would like to see something again.

I don't know if anyone from wizards will actually read this but it is worth a shot.  I miss gaining followers at .... I think it was 9th level.  The idea that once you became experianced enough people of lesser level would come to learn from you.  All you had to do was build a place suited for them to train at.  I would love to see this come back and to see it expanded upon.  It could lead into camp and city building (hey, and excuse for a suppliment of its own) and then to a system of mass combat that could be effected equally by your skill at city building, and your character's actions on the field of battle. 
Don't get me wrong, I love adventuring.  I just think this could add a wonderful dimension to the game that other games seem to have lost.  


Also, look at other games who started to do something similar with great success:  League of Legends, Warcraft 3.  
Yeah. Followers were fun. I used to have a floating island stronghold. Great days. Great days.
The old Leadership feat could be split into two items, Cohorts and Followers. A Cohort could be a Paragon feat, to bring a companion character along to work with your main one. It would have to be just below the character's own level, but not so far below that it couldn't hold its own it an adventure. Followers would be part of an Epic role as the head of a castle, temple, mage tower, school or whatever base of operations the character owned. They wouldn't take part in adventures, but they'd be a large part of the character's home life.
The cohort would be like a a henchmen from 1e, which is the edition the OP is referring to. That really shouldn't be a feat, it should be someone you hire. Which we've played with in every edition. It's somewhere in between a PC an a NPC.  The Followers would be more like the hirelings, which would be like militia men, linkboys, scribes etc.  I don't think you'd have to wait all the way to epic to hire someone to do menial labor for you.

The op is wanting it to be a class feature that at a given level, PCs automatically gain a certain number and type of followers based on class.  I think that'd be a good thing to occur at paragon.  Maybe an 11th level fighter attracts a body of 3d10 level 1 fighters with a level 3 or 4 captain.

I think that idea would be awesome.  However, with Fighters having so many powers and stuff now, a full band of full fledged fighters wouldn't be the way to do it.  It'd be say 3d10 level 1 men-at-arms with a level 4 captain.

Basically, people attracted to a figher o renown for him to command.

Maybe at epic he could attract a band of paragon fighters. 
The cohort would be like a a henchmen from 1e, which is the edition the OP is referring to. That really shouldn't be a feat, it should be someone you hire. Which we've played with in every edition. It's somewhere in between a PC an a NPC.  The Followers would be more like the hirelings, which would be like militia men, linkboys, scribes etc.  I don't think you'd have to wait all the way to epic to hire someone to do menial labor for you.

The op is wanting it to be a class feature that at a given level, PCs automatically gain a certain number and type of followers based on class.  I think that'd be a good thing to occur at paragon.  Maybe an 11th level fighter attracts a body of 3d10 level 1 fighters with a level 3 or 4 captain.

I think that idea would be awesome.  However, with Fighters having so many powers and stuff now, a full band of full fledged fighters wouldn't be the way to do it.  It'd be say 3d10 level 1 men-at-arms with a level 4 captain.

Basically, people attracted to a figher o renown for him to command.

Maybe at epic he could attract a band of paragon fighters. 

I'm not sure whats in store for us, if we will still have paragon and epic distinctions, but you are right.  I would like to see followers as a class feature.  I'm not talking about hirelings.  I think it could open up a lot of different types of adventures for those who would like to take advantage of it. 
Oh Ceiling Cat no.

One player, one character.  No tagalongs.  I *hated* that follower-cohort-henchman stuff.  I told them to GO AWAY.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
I've mentioned this dream before, but I'd like to see this given a good amount of time and attention in a splat about PC leaders. Let's call it Castles and Counts. Or Patricians and Palaces. Bastions and Barons. Anyway. A whole book about ruling kingdoms, running organizations, having followers, and just generally being a mover and shaker in the world instead of a standard dungeon-crawling hero. And of course, it would have a section on building your kick-ass base of operations.

I would vote for a system of "influence points," where you could spend them on Followers (people who follow you for your own sake), Sovereignty (control over an area of land), Resources (non-personal money, for things like fortresses, outfitting your followers, and the like), and your Cohort (your right-hand man person sentient). That way, with the same system, someone could be a ruler of a decent-sized non-impoverished kingdom, the head of a thieves' guild with decent wealth and manpower, or a mad wizard a scant few minions and a weak-but-mad assistant, but a sweet tower.
Rhymes with Bruce
4E actually had a number of options for gaining followers, including a theme, a paragon path, and GP-per-day rules.
Fire Blog Control, Change, and Chaos: The Elemental Power Source Elemental Heroes Example Classes Xaosmith Exulter Chaos Bringer Director Elemental Heroes: Looking Back - Class and Story Elemental Heroes: Complete Class Beta - The Xaosmith (January 16, 2012) Elemental Heroes: Complete Class Beta - The Harbinger (May 16, 2012) Check out my Elemental Heroes blog series and help me develop four unique elemental classes.
4E actually had a number of options for gaining followers, including a theme, a paragon path, and GP-per-day rules.


Really? I must have missed those. How did they work? And which one(s) would you like to see shape how they work in 5th edition?
Rhymes with Bruce
4E actually had a number of options for gaining followers, including a theme, a paragon path, and GP-per-day rules.


Really? I must have missed those. How did they work? And which one(s) would you like to see shape how they work in 5th edition?



Psionic Power: Thrallherd Paragon Path
Heroes of the Feywild: Sidhe Lord Theme
Mordenkainen's Magnificent Emporium: Hirlings and Henchmen (reprinted from some Dragon article)

Followers et al could be used much the same way that pets are, really. Possibly the same way as certain summons, if magic is involved (summon wizard's apprentice!).
Fire Blog Control, Change, and Chaos: The Elemental Power Source Elemental Heroes Example Classes Xaosmith Exulter Chaos Bringer Director Elemental Heroes: Looking Back - Class and Story Elemental Heroes: Complete Class Beta - The Xaosmith (January 16, 2012) Elemental Heroes: Complete Class Beta - The Harbinger (May 16, 2012) Check out my Elemental Heroes blog series and help me develop four unique elemental classes.
I'd have to ageed with both sides here. I didn't really want a stronghold for my own characters but many of my group had endless hours of fun with their henchmen (ahem, you know what I mean). I can recall friends of mine spending hours and hours designing their fortresses and towers...some of those maps were things of beauty.
Gadzooks, that takes me back. Could be interesting. I'd definitely like to see it optional, as not everybody wants to mess around with that stuff. I'm actually winging that stuff right now in my 4E campaign, because it suits the story. Usually it doesn't suit that kind of story I like to run.

I have no time to detail out fortresses for the PCs to capture and hold, but I'm sure some of my crew would love to have a permanent home/castle/base of operations for their characters. Right now their "kingdom" is a motley collection of refugees who have pledged their fealty to the PCs. A very scary collection of refugees and former terrorists, but definitely fits the description of motley. They have some stronger and more prominent followers, and the rabble.
Resident jark. Resident Minister of Education and Misinformation.
i love the henchman/hirelings/followers. good stuff
Oh Ceiling Cat no.

One player, one character.  No tagalongs.  I *hated* that follower-cohort-henchman stuff.  I told them to GO AWAY.



And I love em.  In my LL game we've got 6 PC's and another 4 assorted henchmen some of whom have been around for years.  One of the PC's (mine) has also been bankrolling a militant religious order and slowly helping them lay claim to a vacent fortress as a place to retire to once we hit name level.
I told them to GO AWAY.



And that's what a lot of posters on these boards want; wow, what are the odds?
4e developed hirelings towards the end but it wasnt really the same way (no morale for example). still cool, especially if you have a small adventuring party or just for flavors sake
Hey,

This absolutely need to exist in 5e, and absolutely should not be part of the core rules. I.e. if modularisation is the new thing, then this is a perfect example of where to deploy it.

Yours,

JMH 
I agree the system since 3e has been far too focused on combat and not out of combat rules.   It would be nice to see the game return to its roots.

For me there was nothing more rewarding than when my fighter became a Lord.    9th level was a very cool accomplishment.     


I agree the system since 3e has been far too focused on combat and not out of combat rules.   It would be nice to see the game return to its roots.

For me there was nothing more rewarding than when my fighter became a Lord.    9th level was a very cool accomplishment.     


Do you really think the leveling rules should dictate such a story-based element as becoming a lord? 

Standard Answer to all 5E rules questions: "Ask your DM."

I agree the system since 3e has been far too focused on combat and not out of combat rules.   It would be nice to see the game return to its roots.

For me there was nothing more rewarding than when my fighter became a Lord.    9th level was a very cool accomplishment.     


Do you really think the leveling rules should dictate such a story-based element as becoming a lord? 




Yes, I would like to see the game at least suggest story based rewards and roles for each class.     


I loved my Shadowblade (Fighter/Thief Halfelf Kit) in 2e.  When he got followers (and a well-earned Wish) he set up an information brokering guild in Sigil.  Although I played him in Realms, Spelljammer, and Ravenloft, when I ran my own Planescape games, players started out interacting with the guild and its tavern headquarters extensively.

I was a big fan of followers, especially as a way to extend high-level games into low-level territory once again for new campaigns.  

Envisioning followers in the future, having a humanoid companion wouldn't be all that different from having an animal companion or the like.  They could be a knight's squire, a wizard's personal bodyguard, a rogue's urchin trainee, or a cleric's devoted disciple. 
I agree the system since 3e has been far too focused on combat and not out of combat rules.   It would be nice to see the game return to its roots.

For me there was nothing more rewarding than when my fighter became a Lord.    9th level was a very cool accomplishment.     


Do you really think the leveling rules should dictate such a story-based element as becoming a lord? 




Yes, I would like to see the game at least suggest story based rewards and roles for each class.     


But my point is, why would it be tied to class or level? Isn't becoming a lord something that should be dictated solely by the needs of the narrative (which has nothing to do with the system)?

It would seem to me to be an odd society (though perhaps not entirely unheard of) where lordship was determined by one's ability to kill things in a particular style of combat.

Standard Answer to all 5E rules questions: "Ask your DM."

most countries came to be following a series of warriors fighting for control of the land.  the winners (those most skilled at killing in a particular style of combat and leading other like minded killers) then determined who would rule and how.  Very often they put themselves and their decendants in charge of the city/country/tribe... really, how many places in a midevil setting did not start this way?


I think at least one, if not a series, of well selling books could be made for the new system based on these discussions.  
Strongholds and guild building, Land/village development and resource management, mass combat and the building of armies, Specific adventures designed for the prestiege classes that would build do this sort of thing.  The narrative would be important, but the narrative should be supported by a well thought out system.
Oh Ceiling Cat no.

One player, one character.  No tagalongs.  I *hated* that follower-cohort-henchman stuff.  I told them to GO AWAY.



I agree with this sentiment, though followers could easily be brought in as an optional feature. I do not want it to be considered a class feature, and to be honest I really just don't don't want to keep up with them. Honestly, I think followers like in 2nd ed should be done via fluff. Where the clout from your adventures just brings an abstract amount of people to a domain you through roleplaying gained control over. That or it be done sort of like how Pathfinder did Kingmaker. I also feel that keeping it fluff allows for you to recycle characters from past games into newer stories, make your character a servant or follower of your old or a friend's old character.

(If you want the abbreviated version, keep mechanics an optional feature, but for like nations/personal keeps or whatever make it all fluff based.)) 
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