Daily Resources Must Die: My Most Hoped-for Sacred Hamburger in 5e

Every edition since the beginning has had daily resources, though some more than others (Vancian casting, I'm looking at you). Unfortunately, daily resources, or really any resource that doesn't refresh every encounter (or, at most, every other encounter) has several significant negative impacts on the game.

Problem 1: The Five Minute Workday
If resources refresh based on some specific character action, rather than on a per-encounter basis, there will always be the temptation to refresh them between every encounter. "Uh oh, the wizard used two of his top-level spells, better take an 8-hour nap," or "Crud, the wizard got hit twice and used half his healing surges, we need to rest, just in case." In addition to it being obnoxious from a story-telling perspective for only getting into one fight per day, this also contributes to the next issue.

Problem 2: Swingier, Longer Encounters
Resources that aren't dependent on encounters make encounters harder to build: the DM is forced to guess how many such resources will be expended during the encounter. Guess low, and the fight is a short cake-walk. Guess high, and the fight is a painful or even deadly multi-hour grindfest. Players who try to conserve resource for "harder" fights later on make the earlier fights harder than they should be, as well as more time consuming.

Problem 3: Class Diversity & Balance
If you want classes to be balanced (and you should), they must have exactly the same daily resources. Otherwise, you end up with the main problem 3rd edition had: some characters are built for short, explosive fights, while others are built for long slugfests. Naturally, the party will pick one of these two (traditionally, the short and decisive battles), and anyone whose character is better for the other kind is just **** outta luck. If, however, all daily resources are eliminated, encounter balance becomes easier, which makes it easier to balance different mechanics since you know how long fights should be lasting and thus can build each class to contribute about the same amount over that time period.

TLDR: Daily resources make it harder to design encounters and harder to create balanced but mechanically distinct classes.

Edit: Here's some comments I made further in to try to explain this a little better.

57135478 wrote:
I don't necessarily mean everything should be an encounter power, just that nothing's recharge should be tied to anything longer than "every other encounter".

Here are some examples of mechanics that meet that criteria:
1) at-will abilities
2) 1/encounter abilities
3) X/encounter abilities
4) die-roll recharge (like many monsters have in 4e)
5) power points (like psionics in 3.5 and 4e)
6) cycling recharge (crusaders from 3.5 Bo9S)
7) triggered recharge (warblade from 3.5 Bo9S)
8) conditional recharge (such as dragons that regain their breath weapon when bloodied)

And those are just off the top of my head, there's probably plenty more mechanics that could be used to create diversity in class mechanics without breaking balance.



57135478 wrote:
I've thought of another (potential) advantage to eliminating daily resources. This works by combining two things that would otherwise be somewhat bad.

1) In both 4e and previous editions, abilities that were on a per day basis tended to be the most powerful (with the exception of the rare per week, per month, or per year ability, which I obviously loathe even more). Taking those out is likely to take away some of the player's big guns.

2) One of the common complaints about 4e is that it doesn't encourage improvisational roleplaying during combat, i.e. why would somewhat think to swing from a chandelier and kick people when they're concentrating on their powers. While I personally don't feel it inhibits that sort of thing, I can agree that for some people it could be an issue.

What if we solve both these issues by replacing daily-strength abilities with improvised attacks? Imagine a simple ruleset or table explaining how to express an improvised attack in terms of mechanics. For a given level, you might have:

single target: A + iX damage, or B + iX damage & status effect(s)
multi target: C + iX/2 damage, or D + iX/2 damage & status effect(s)
where i = the number of skill checks you had to succeed at to perform the action (you would need acrobatics and/or athletics to swing from a chandelier, for example, while tipping a pile of rocks on foes would use athletics or be automatic with a lever)
A > B > C > D

The numer, type, & difficulty of skill checks would be totally up to the DM, as would any status effects applied.

This not only makes high-powered effects available to players again, it also encourages improvisational roleplaying during combat.



57135478 wrote:
While I am a fan of 4e's surge mechanic, I'm not suggesting that HP & surges should refill every encounter. Rather, you should have a max number of surges and then recover some fraction of your total every encounter or every milestone.

This way, a series of nasty fights still puts you at risk of running out of surges if you spend more than you're recovering, while a series of easier fights lets you restock back to full if you're spending less than you're recovering. Similarly, because you recover a fraction of your total, characters with lots of surges can afford to spend more per encounter.

What do you think of generalized limited use enhancements though like ACtion Points?

I think Action POints would be a fitting replacement. Perhaps each class gets a bonus when they use them too so it still feels a little bit like a Daily but it's an enhancement of something you can do (or doubling it in one turn) instead of an exclusive thing that you only do once a day.

It would change the feeling to being a Bonus instead of a Restriction.

I think there's a strong enough audience for Daily Spells to stay tough. If those consume Action Points to cast it works within the same resources as noncasters, but still feels different.
Action points are already essentially an encounter system since they're based off of milestones (every other encounter) as long as you remove the ability to reset to 1 by sleeping.

Anything tied to action points is fine, as long as action points are only gained from encounters (or milestones, which are encounter-based).
I'm with you.  Daily resources need to go bye-bye.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
um... no. completely disagree.

With my OP'd group (and I knowingly permit-even encourage it-in the name of fun), I just assume they always have all their dailies available.

Makes it really easy to plan encounters.

I will not play a game where the only difference from class to class is the name. And I get to swing a stick or swing a sword or swing a sparkles effect or swing a cat...

I was on a blands diet for two years, I don't need a metaphorical one as well.

And truly, if you don't like daily resources, there are enough variant rules out there to support it. Just removing them altogether....

(yes yes they could make dailies a variant, but I expect more people would end up using such a variant than a non daily baseline..see 4th)
I agree wholeheartedly.  Tooting my own horn a bit, but this is how I'd like to see D&D handled: lots of varied and replenishing encounter resources, for a wide variety of unique and cool tricks in combat for every class without the slugfest of at-wills or the explosive swinginess of dailies.
Hmm.  I could dig it.

Balancing simply within the scope of an encounter would be far easier, espeically for creating equivalent variety.  Focusing purely on a single encounter would also a lot of other resource options; skills that recharge based on time or circumstances, skills that chain into other abilities, or skills that draw from a special resource pool, etc.  Since everything is encapsulated, it could be far easier to ensure that everything fits within a balanced framework for both spike potential and round-by-round effectiveness.  Meanwhile, action points could be a modular edition that allows super moves within a given frame of time/storytelling, thus allowing for super moves only if the group desires it.

A good plan.  :D
per-encounter resources are boring and restrict so much more than per-day resources for glaringly obvious reasons.  from a gameplay perspective they don't add anything in particular.  as a "big guns" thing they're an opening salvo rather than a tactical decision.

at-will resources need to be varied and interesting or just simple, easy to use and sufficiently powerful.  getting rid of limited-use resources removes so much tension and excitement from the adventuring day.
um... no. completely disagree.

With my OP'd group (and I knowingly permit-even encourage it-in the name of fun), I just assume they always have all their dailies available.

Makes it really easy to plan encounters.

I will not play a game where the only difference from class to class is the name. And I get to swing a stick or swing a sword or swing a sparkles effect or swing a cat...

I was on a blands diet for two years, I don't need a metaphorical one as well.

And truly, if you don't like daily resources, there are enough variant rules out there to support it. Just removing them altogether....

(yes yes they could make dailies a variant, but I expect more people would end up using such a variant than a non daily baseline..see 4th)



You're missing the point. If you don't have to balance daily-using classes with non-daily classes, you can suddenly put in a lot more variety in other mechanics without ruining balance.
all you have to balance is average day length, over the course of the campaign, not even every day's length.  which isn't that hard for anybody.  i'm not really sure what's happening in your head to convince you otherwise.
all you have to balance is average day length, over the course of the campaign, not even every day's length.  which isn't that hard for anybody.  i'm not really sure what's happening in your head to convince you otherwise.



So, what you're saying is, the rulebook should tell every DM: "Have 5 encounters per day. No more. No less. Otherwise, these books you paid all that money for are worthless!"
that post had literally 3 sentences in it, come on.
that post had literally 3 sentences in it, come on.



Too few? Or too many? Need details! This sentence makes 4.
that post had literally 3 sentences in it, come on.



Too few? Or too many? Need details! This sentence makes 4.



just enough, meaning you getting the entirely wrong meaning out of it is depressing.

i loled at 4 though 
all you have to balance is average day length, over the course of the campaign, not even every day's length.  which isn't that hard for anybody.

8 years of 'fighter SUX' threads in the 3.x forums disagree with you.   Yes, if you can balance daily and unlimitted resources /at a point/ - a magic number of encounters/day and rounds/encounter - and if you run your campaign in a perfect bell-curve around that point, yes, you can minimize class imbalance between daily and non-daily classes.  The imbalance is still there, it's just that the times when the daily-user saves the day in a dramatic moment of a particularly tough and all-important battle, are countered by those when the non-daily user 'shines' by slogging through the 8th grueling encounter of a long, brutal day while the tapped-out daily guys are hiding in their Rope Trick, reading Playelf. 
OK, maybe not perfectly countered.  ;)



 

 

Oops, looks like this request tried to create an infinite loop. We do not allow such things here. We are a professional website!

that point was just too many fights in before.  it needs to be much earlier in the day and less sloggy is all (see essentials vs aedu in a non-optimized table).
so when killing al daly powers what system will we put in it's place?

maybe somthing like simple power point system,

character starts with 3 (5 is maximum) you are re set to 3 points after each short rest.
at the end of your turn you gain 1 point.

0 points powers simular to the at wills in 4th edition.
1 power point equivilent to 4th edition encounter power.
3 power points equal to 4th edition daily power

it would pace the use of what where daly powers
if you use somehing that was a daily power you have to spend 3 rounds of using at wills till you can use a daily eqivilent power again.


 
Okay, I can live without Dailies or nightly Spell List memorizations.

But I do like resources that refresh.   I don't mind if those refreshing periods are a bit abstract. Every encounter. Every milestone. Every "Rest Period." If none of them are measured on a daily (or hourly or any other type of independtly metered chronology), it's no skin off my nose!
I'd be totally fine with ditching "X per day" powers and abilities, but I'd like to see some method of making a long stretch feel long, for some reason for rest beyond RP. Power Points, or endurance mechanics, I don't care what. But I want some kind of mechanical reflection of the characters pushing themselves to the point of exhaustion.
Rhymes with Bruce
I'd be totally fine with ditching "X per day" powers and abilities, but I'd like to see some method of making a long stretch feel long, for some reason for rest beyond RP. Power Points, or endurance mechanics, I don't care what. But I want some kind of mechanical reflection of the characters pushing themselves to the point of exhaustion.



This brings an interesting point: being out of per-encounter resources serves to make an encounter feel overly long the same way being out of per-day resources makes a day feel strenuous to your characters.
I'd be totally fine with ditching "X per day" powers and abilities, but I'd like to see some method of making a long stretch feel long, for some reason for rest beyond RP. Power Points, or endurance mechanics, I don't care what. But I want some kind of mechanical reflection of the characters pushing themselves to the point of exhaustion.


A really good system of conditions and effects could provide that.

For instance, let's say we were going with At-Will, Recharging, and Encounter abilities, with that second one being the new thing for class-specific ways they generate or regenerate small specials.

During the campaign, certain events, traps, or enemies could inflict conditions which drain or exhaust players, creating the condition "until cured, you cannot use encounter powers".  Suddenly, your character has been debilitated in a dramatic fashion, and not only does this provide the sense of weakness or fatigue, but the game can actually balance it out, since it knows exactly how strong encounter powers should be.  These sorts of effects could also play out in battle; a mage might use Counterspelling to spend Recharging or Encounter power "slots" in order to block the Recharging or Encounter abilities of a foe.
I agree with OP. It IS nive having "nova" abilities, but the "once per day" limitation brings too much baggage with it. For me, it's not simulationist enough, in most cases. "So, you can only do that neat trick you learned once a day no matter what?!" If abilities are going to be limited, it shouldn't this arbitrary.

Of course, the other reasons you listed are also quite valid, which makes daily powers an all around annoying idea.

I like the idea of having "action points", though. Some kind of generic bonus that you can use in a pinch. Or perhaps a system where your energies build up during a battle so that you can unleash a nova strike every battle, but only after you've played so many rounds, or taken enough damage, or delivered ehough damage, or have set it up with other abilites.

You could also make these nova abilities far more specific in scope. Instead of "1/day, do massive damage to something" it would be "Do massive damage to undead". The vampire-killer can nova strike undead all day long, because that's his schtick. Anywhere else, he's still competent, though. (Yes, I am aware of the myriad downfalls of this idea. I'm just tossing it out anyway).
Neither you nor dragon cat have bad ideas, there.

The trick is simplifying them or finding a simple base you can build them from.

I'd like to see it done, though. You could always do something like the old d20 spycraft game, where the DM gets an "operating budget" of sorts and trap effects and conditions cost a certain amount of that operating budget to inflict on players.


Players might increase the operating budget of the DM when they spend their "action points," since they're stretching the rules for their own benefit. Something like that.       
I'd be totally fine with ditching "X per day" powers and abilities, but I'd like to see some method of making a long stretch feel long, for some reason for rest beyond RP. Power Points, or endurance mechanics, I don't care what. But I want some kind of mechanical reflection of the characters pushing themselves to the point of exhaustion.



This brings an interesting point: being out of per-encounter resources serves to make an encounter feel overly long the same way being out of per-day resources makes a day feel strenuous to your characters.



That's a good point. Hopefully it would be balanced with a wider selection of at-will abilities, ideally ones that are relatively tactically interesting. Maybe you get 5 at-wills: a basic attack and 4 more specialized ones that are noticeably better than a basic attack under the right circumstances (bonus damage when flanking?  less dmg but knock prone? stuff like that).
Neither you nor dragon cat have bad ideas, there.

The trick is simplifying them or finding a simple base you can build them from.

I'd like to see it done, though. You could always do something like the old d20 spycraft game, where the DM gets an "operating budget" of sorts and trap effects and conditions cost a certain amount of that operating budget to inflict on players.


Players might increase the operating budget of the DM when they spend their "action points," since they're stretching the rules for their own benefit. Something like that.       


I seem to remember the boardgame Descent having a rule like that. The players had to weigh their options, between "we can't risk letting the DM get those last few tokens" and "We need to get this [REDACTED] under control now." It worked really well for a dungeon-crawl-against-the-darkness feel.
Rhymes with Bruce
Call me crazy here, but if everything is an "encounter" power, wouldn't that make every encounter pretty much identical?
Would that even really be a "bad" thing?
Call me crazy here, but if everything is an "encounter" power, wouldn't that make every encounter pretty much identical?
Would that even really be a "bad" thing?



I don't necessarily mean everything should be an encounter power, just that nothing's recharge should be tied to anything longer than "every other encounter".

Here are some examples of mechanics that meet that criteria:
1) at-will abilities
2) 1/encounter abilities
3) X/encounter abilities
4) die-roll recharge (like many monsters have in 4e)
5) power points (like psionics in 3.5 and 4e)
6) cycling recharge (crusaders from 3.5 Bo9S)
7) triggered recharge (warblade from 3.5 Bo9S)
8) conditional recharge (such as dragons that regain their breath weapon when bloodied)

And those are just off the top of my head, there's probably plenty more mechanics that could be used to create diversity in class mechanics without breaking balance.
I don't have a problem with dailys being removed from the game. 

The problem I have is with encounter powers that can only be used once.    

I want a system that allows me to use the same encounter power more than once.    For example, if I have 4 encounter powers I should have the option of casting the same encounter spell 4 times.    

 


I could probably live without Daily powers. (To an extent I have, having played a Slayer, and a Knight.) Sometimes, I find myself holding on to them too long.

I do like having Encounter powers that refresh with a short rest.

What about some use once per Encounter powers, and some recharge powers like monsters get?
RS: 60/60 CS: 60/60 RotS: 60/60 U:60/60 CotF: 60/60 BH: 60/60 A&E: 51/60 TFU: 53/60 LotF: 37/60 KotOR: 37/60 CW: 26/40 IE: 31/40 JA: 17/40 G@W: 7/40 DT: 7/40 Good trades with: Lily_Wan, creme_brule, suki_jedi_apprentice, Ephant_Mon
Every edition since the beginning has had daily resources, though some more than others (Vancian casting, I'm looking at you). Unfortunately, daily resources, or really any resource that doesn't refresh every encounter (or, at most, every other encounter) has several significant negative impacts on the game.

Problem 1: The Five Minute Workday
If resources refresh based on some specific character action, rather than on a per-encounter basis, there will always be the temptation to refresh them between every encounter. "Uh oh, the wizard used two of his top-level spells, better take an 8-hour nap," or "Crud, the wizard got hit twice and used half his healing surges, we need to rest, just in case." In addition to it being obnoxious from a story-telling perspective for only getting into one fight per day, this also contributes to the next issue.

Problem 2: Swingier, Longer Encounters
Resources that aren't dependent on encounters make encounters harder to build: the DM is forced to guess how many such resources will be expended during the encounter. Guess low, and the fight is a short cake-walk. Guess high, and the fight is a painful or even deadly multi-hour grindfest. Players who try to conserve resource for "harder" fights later on make the earlier fights harder than they should be, as well as more time consuming.

Problem 3: Class Diversity & Balance
If you want classes to be balanced (and you should), they must have exactly the same daily resources. Otherwise, you end up with the main problem 3rd edition had: some characters are built for short, explosive fights, while others are built for long slugfests. Naturally, the party will pick one of these two (traditionally, the short and decisive battles), and anyone whose character is better for the other kind is just **** outta luck. If, however, all daily resources are eliminated, encounter balance becomes easier, which makes it easier to balance different mechanics since you know how long fights should be lasting and thus can build each class to contribute about the same amount over that time period.

TLDR: Daily resources make it harder to design encounters and harder to create balanced but mechanically distinct classes.

Problem 1: Yes, this is a true statement, but without beyond-encounter resources you have killed most of the point for most encounters. The resource game IS most of what D&D adventuring is about. As soon as you remove that you are left with nothing but 'immediate threat', and you will have to build every encounter to be either capable of instant lethality or it is meaningless. Pacing and tension beyond the encounter go out of the window.

Problem 2: So what? It isn't about individual encounters. It is about making your way through an adventure and achieving your goals. Walk all over encounter 1 and encounter 2 is going to be a lot riskier. This is an essential part of the game, giving players control and letting them make decisions.

Problem 3: This is far overblown. 4e Essentials e-martial classes difference from AEDU classes in actual play over different numbers of encounters falls into the noise. Variations from luck, skill in play, build variations, etc provide much higher variance than differences in resource cycle. Besides, D&D has survived reasonably well with different resource cycles for different classes for 3+ decades without significant problems.

I think this is one of those frequent cases where people don't really understand the implications of what they are asking for. It is simply a bad idea all around. You're gutting much of the essence of the game for a mediocre gain in convenience and in the process you'll achieve your result and end up with a much more bland and uninteresting game.



That is not dead which may eternal lie
Call me crazy here, but if everything is an "encounter" power, wouldn't that make every encounter pretty much identical?
Would that even really be a "bad" thing?



I don't necessarily mean everything should be an encounter power, just that nothing's recharge should be tied to anything other than encounters.

Here are some examples of mechanics that meet that criteria:
1) at-will abilities
2) 1/encounter abilities
3) X/encounter abilities
4) die-roll recharge (like many monsters have in 4e)
5) power points (like psionics in 3.5 and 4e)
6) cycling recharge (crusaders from 3.5 Bo9S)
7) triggered recharge (warblade from 3.5 Bo9S)
8) conditional recharge (such as dragons that regain their breath weapon when bloodied)

And those are just off the top of my head, there's probably plenty more mechanics that could be used to create diversity in class mechanics without breaking balance.

Not sure I like some of the specific cases you list, but in general there's nothing wrong with powers being recoverable on a schedule that is more closely tied to the adventure and more related to its overall pacing (and thus more under DM control and less likely to induce the players to want to stop and rest).

I think specifically

3) X/encounter abilities - already used to some effectiveness in 4e with heals mostly. This is OK, but note that anything beyond 2 uses is basically at-will and I wouldn't use this for attack powers much. It works well for heals because they aren't the only thing the PC does that round and are central to the character concept.

4) die-roll rechage - too swingy. PC resource availability probably should not be based on luck at all. Keep dice for conflict resolution type mechanics.

I DO like 8) conditional recharge - this can be a good mechanic to for instance insure that PC can access some sort of big move at a dramatic point in play. I think I'd limit it to recovery of a 'daily' used in a PREVIOUS encounter, so you can't use it to double up.

not really sure what 6 and 7 are, but I would note that KISS is the operative word here, don't add things that require additional tracking.

5) power points - hmmmmm, this is one of those things that every game designer seems to find irresistable yet rarely work out well. It is very hard to balance out the different possible uses so that one doesn't simply have a better cost/benefit ratio than all the others. This is harder than the AEDU or Vancian kind of "here's a list of things to pick from" because it is more granular. Even small differences lead to spamming of one option. 4e psionics are a perfect example. Also violates KISS as it requires yet another resource to track.

That is not dead which may eternal lie
7 is quite simple: In 4e terms, it would be like having an at-will power that says, "Standard Action: Regain all your expended encounter powers."

6 is admittedly a bit complex. In 4e terms, it would be somewhat like having an at-will power that says, "No Action: (Trigger = You have expended all, or all but one, of your encounter powers); Refresh encounter powers at random until you have 3 encounter powers available."

The houserule I use for Daily powers is that in low stress periods where few encounters are expected a day, Daily powers don't recharge until after a number of milestones (or it just feels right).


I dislike the name "Daily" as for its implications when it's obvious that Daily powers don't function properly in a one encounter per day environment, and the easiest fix is to adjust the refresh to a different trigger (encounters, milestones, etc) in such cases.  

I would agree. Huge attacks should have a more immediate drawback. It's somewhat strange to see a wizard toss out his greatest attack like it ain't no thang, but then not use before or after it because "it's only for emergencies, gotta concerve my delicate energies." Besides, prepareing a one-use spell for later is more of an artificer or gadgeteer's flavor. It's their job to formulate a bomb for later use. Why are wizards opperating so samey?

I can certainly see several colorful ways of handling "big powers" which could be handed out to each flavor of adventurer. Most of which have been listed, and are wildly underused.

A roll at the start of a turn to recoup a reserve of power points is another simple mechanic. You use your big ten-pointer and then take a few turns to recoup the energy. Good for psions...

Powers you have to remain static to maintain, huge powers that leave you weakened, or unconcious... These are things I see in literature when it comes to magic.

The roll to regain use would be excelent for Devine powers, as the gods grant you each favor.

The bloodied recharge fits well with the heavy hitting Fighters and Barbarians and positional requirements or concealment/stealth requirements are a natural fit for Rogues. 
 Not sure I like some of the specific cases you list, but in general there's nothing wrong with powers being recoverable on a schedule that is more closely tied to the adventure and more related to its overall pacing (and thus more under DM control and less likely to induce the players to want to stop and rest).

I think specifically

3) X/encounter abilities - already used to some effectiveness in 4e with heals mostly. This is OK, but note that anything beyond 2 uses is basically at-will and I wouldn't use this for attack powers much. It works well for heals because they aren't the only thing the PC does that round and are central to the character concept.

4) die-roll rechage - too swingy. PC resource availability probably should not be based on luck at all. Keep dice for conflict resolution type mechanics.

I DO like 8) conditional recharge - this can be a good mechanic to for instance insure that PC can access some sort of big move at a dramatic point in play. I think I'd limit it to recovery of a 'daily' used in a PREVIOUS encounter, so you can't use it to double up.

not really sure what 6 and 7 are, but I would note that KISS is the operative word here, don't add things that require additional tracking.

5) power points - hmmmmm, this is one of those things that every game designer seems to find irresistable yet rarely work out well. It is very hard to balance out the different possible uses so that one doesn't simply have a better cost/benefit ratio than all the others. This is harder than the AEDU or Vancian kind of "here's a list of things to pick from" because it is more granular. Even small differences lead to spamming of one option. 4e psionics are a perfect example. Also violates KISS as it requires yet another resource to track.



As long as you agree that Vancian does not keep it simple or stupid.

I'm actually fully in agreement with the OP's post.

However, no daily resources doesn't have to mean the same thing as all characters working on the same mechanic. For an example, spellcasters' abilities could be based mostly on encounter-abilities, fighty characters could be based on stuff like at-will stances (in the vein of the Knight and the Slayer) as well having a robust list of maneuvers that anyone can explore but that the fighty classes would simply be better at pulling off and making use of.

A roll at the start of a turn to recoup a reserve of power points is another simple mechanic. You use your big ten-pointer and then take a few turns to recoup the energy. Good for psions...



Hell, call it 'Fatigue' and use it for EVERY class.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.

A roll at the start of a turn to recoup a reserve of power points is another simple mechanic. You use your big ten-pointer and then take a few turns to recoup the energy. Good for psions...



Hell, call it 'Fatigue' and use it for EVERY class.



Let's not use the same mechanic for every class; that's something that a lot of 3.5 fans didn't like about 4e.
Its also what many players who did switch to 4th like most...
Nobody had a problem with "force points for everybody!" in Saga.

A roll at the start of a turn to recoup a reserve of power points is another simple mechanic. You use your big ten-pointer and then take a few turns to recoup the energy. Good for psions...



Hell, call it 'Fatigue' and use it for EVERY class.



Aren't we shooting for chracters that play differently?

Why not have one set of mechanics:
Hit a Thing: d20 to hit DEF, 1d8 damage
Hit more things: d20 to hit a coupl'a DEFs, 1d6 damage
Hit Really hard: (just not all the time) d20 vs DEF, 1d12 damage
Do a thing: d20 vs DC 
No modifiers, no bookkeeping,  and you can make pretend as whatever you want to be.
[/sarcasm] 
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