"How do we get Sprite drinkers to only drink Coke?" Is a unified edition really a good idea?

I guess that's what they're going for with 'modular'

But really, what makes supporting multiple editions a bad idea? There are 3.X/PF players, 4e players, AD&D players, they all have their FAVORITE D&D experience already!

At worst, what we have here is the elimination of Coke n' Sprite to create some kind of Spoke to 'unify the fanbase'

I guess that's what they're going for with 'modular'

But really, what makes supporting multiple editions a bad idea? There are 3.X/PF players, 4e players, AD&D players, they all have their FAVORITE D&D experience already!

At worst, what we have here is the elimination of Coke n' Sprite to create some kind of Spoke to 'unify the fanbase'




You meen Coke n' Sprite to Spook the fanbase right?  Laughing


-Polaris
Supporting multiple editions is a laudable goal, but previous experience has shown that it's just not sustainable as a business model. TSR was keeping Basic and Advanced versions of the game going at the same time, and they eventually figured something out: most of their fanbase was locked out of half of their product. With a low-margin business like RPGs, cutting your potential sales of a given product like that is tantamount to suicide.

Also, keep in mind that there are a lot of people who could be "won over" to a new edition. I'm among the group that sees each previous edition as flawed in some significant way. If they were to create a modular edition that would let me address those flaws in my own way without a serious overhaul, I'd be completely into it.
Rhymes with Bruce
Just to continue the analogy a bit, is there any reason we can't have...

Coke Classic
Diet Coke
Caffeine Free Coke
Caffeine Free Diet Coke
Cherry Coke
Vanilla Coke
Cherry Vanilla Coke
Diet Coke with Splenda
Coke Zero

Etc? 

They're all coke, just different varieties and flavors.

All around helpful simian

If you try and please everybody, you won't please anybody.  Each edition should focus on a part of the gamming communtiy and attempt the cater to what they want in a game.
Just to continue the analogy a bit, is there any reason we can't have...

Coke Classic
Diet Coke
Caffeine Free Coke
Caffeine Free Diet Coke
Cherry Coke
Vanilla Coke
Cherry Vanilla Coke
Diet Coke with Splenda
Coke Zero

Etc? 

They're all coke, just different varieties and flavors.




That depends.  Coca Cola is a huge multinational megacorp easily worth billions and billions of dollars all towards pushing "coke".  Even then, the lion's share of it's product is one product:  Coke Classic.  That is it's flagship.


Do you really think that Wotc has (or Hasbro will permit Wotc to have) the resources to push a flageship game and a bunch of subsidiary games especially when each subsidiary game will have it's own start up and fixed and maintanence costs?


My point is what works on a massive sky (like Coke or Pepsi) doesn't necessarily work on the much smaller scale.


-Polaris        

Just to continue the analogy a bit, is there any reason we can't have...

Coke Classic
Diet Coke
Caffeine Free Coke
Caffeine Free Diet Coke
Cherry Coke
Vanilla Coke
Cherry Vanilla Coke
Diet Coke with Splenda
Coke Zero

Etc? 

They're all coke, just different varieties and flavors.




That depends.  Coca Cola is a huge multinational megacorp easily worth billions and billions of dollars all towards pushing "coke".  Even then, the lion's share of it's product is one product:  Coke Classic.  That is it's flagship.


Do you really think that Wotc has (or Hasbro will permit Wotc to have) the resources to push a flageship game and a bunch of subsidiary games especially when each subsidiary game will have it's own start up and fixed and maintanence costs?


My point is what works on a massive sky (like Coke or Pepsi) doesn't necessarily work on the much smaller scale.


-Polaris        



Not to mention, Coke is consumable. People are ok buying a case of vanilla coke on a whim, because when it runs out they can go back to the regular version. If we start having multiple incompatible versions of D&D, every purchase becomes a sunk cost and locks that player in a little more to that version, because his books don't go away. Sure it's a fallacy from a logical point of view, but it's the way people behave.
Rhymes with Bruce
Supporting multiple editions is a laudable goal, but previous experience has shown that it's just not sustainable as a business model. TSR was keeping Basic and Advanced versions of the game going at the same time, and they eventually figured something out: most of their fanbase was locked out of half of their product. With a low-margin business like RPGs, cutting your potential sales of a given product like that is tantamount to suicide.

Also, keep in mind that there are a lot of people who could be "won over" to a new edition. I'm among the group that sees each previous edition as flawed in some significant way. If they were to create a modular edition that would let me address those flaws in my own way without a serious overhaul, I'd be completely into it.



That's the thing, the RPG business doesn't have to be so small margin.  In this day and age with electronic distribution, they would charge $15-$20 per book, instead of $40 and I'd be they'd have a larger margin of profit.

If you try and please everybody, you won't please anybody.  Each edition should focus on a part of the gamming communtiy and attempt the cater to what they want in a game.



That's why we have pathfinder, retroclones, and 4e. Now 4e is called a failure because people are playing retroclones and pathfinder. WotC wants them all.
I don't think they're planning on running multiple editions against eachother, I think the idea is more to provide a system by which your favorite features of seperate editions can be used to build a "favorite" D&D system out of what you liked, while throwing out what you didn't.

I don't know what anyone has played, but if you're familiar with mechwarrior, think clan omnimechs. So many slots taken for essential basics and everything else can be swapped in and out at leisure with minimal effort.

Technically, it could prove enormously profitable, since the paychecks and layouts have already been paid, especially if they're capitalizing on electronic resources. It means they could get profit from all those out of print and extraneous supplements by offering them repackaged and recycled for the system with minimal effort, in effect getting two profit cycles in the place of one. Lesser knowns could be epub'd only, allowing for a nearly 90% profit margin.

If the system to allow it could work out, it's a brilliant business idea, since everyone can play whatever edition they want, with sufficient support to feel a part of the community and invested again.

But yes, if it goes badly and tries to amalgamate everything in some horrid, twisted abomination hate-birth of 1st-4th... yeah.... it could go....*ahem* badly.
If you try and please everybody, you won't please anybody.  Each edition should focus on a part of the gamming communtiy and attempt the cater to what they want in a game.



That's why we have pathfinder, retroclones, and 4e. Now 4e is called a failure because people are playing retroclones and pathfinder. WotC wants them all.



Actually if what I am reading is even partially true, it's not that Wotc wants them all, but they have to grab them all just to make the Hasbro dictated 50 million dollar figure which no TRPG could meet...not even if these were the Golden Age of the 1980s.  This is the last gasp, hail mary pass before (IMHO and I hope I'm wrong) Hasbro shuts DnD down and shelves the IP.

-Polaris