Greyhawk 5E

The Rumor on the street is that Greyhawk will be the default setting again.


Mostly this rumor is caused by me going around saying that with no proof or any clue other than one rumor that keeps getting repeated by me.


Just saying.
I hope not.

I hope there is no "default setting". Just a book of tools that will allow me to create my own setting. If I want a designed setting... then I'll pursue it. 
Hopefully they will support what ever will sell. I for one think all settings should get a nod if possible. Then I can take what I want and leave the res,t as I continue to build my own setting.
ROTFLMAO!  Someon should start a rumor about Blackmoor too!
I've never played Greyhawk, but I'd like to see it comeback, so that I can. I'd be willing to play Original Edition or 1st, or 2nd or AD&D or whatever if someone in my group wanted to run the setting.
Alignments are Fluid, meaning that they are based off of your actions, not your actions being based of the alignment.
The core game should include absolutely zero setting material. It's extraneous material that discourages buy-in. Put it in an appendix or a separate book.
I would like to see Greyhawk, FR, Dark Sun, and Plane Scape settings. No default setting, Gygax was against that, he didn't even want to publish Greyhawk, his own personal system.
Alignments are Fluid, meaning that they are based off of your actions, not your actions being based of the alignment.
I think that if there is an "implied setting" it should be Greyhawk. However, it'd also be good to have no implied setting. I do want a sort of micro-setting in the DMG or equivalent, like the Nentir Vale. It should have a hex map. I'd really like to see some setting material for Greyhawk in 5e. Blackmoor as well, because I'm perhaps even more of a fan of Blackmoor. In fact it's be pretty easy to use Blackmoor as the setting in the DMG, because it's relatively small. Bonus points if we get a converted version of Temple of the Frog.
I can't really tell the differences between most settings, except for maybe ebberon and definitely Dark Sun. 
Ant Farm
Then I would wager you haven't read a great deal on, or campaigned in, Greyhawk, Blackmoor, Krynn or Forgotten Realms. Each is a 'classic' setting, but with a library of source material. It requires work to understand the differences.
The core game should include absolutely zero setting material. It's extraneous material that discourages buy-in. Put it in an appendix or a separate book.



I disagree.  When I opened my copy of the 3e Players Handbook and started reading some of the setting-specific fluff regarding deities (as well as other bits I have a hard time remember eleven years later), I wanted to know more about Greyhawk.  Enough to make me purchase the Living Greyhawk Gazeteer when it released.

Edit  Reading through the 4e core books, the small amount of micro-setting material they included just felt like a stock, un-inspired fantasy re-hash.  Without any depth to it, it put me off on investing in their campaign settings, driving me to work that much harder at developing original content.  In hindsight, though, I won't say that was a bad thing.  My players have had more fun in my worlds than in Faerun or Dark Sun.  Edit
I'm actually looking forward to D&D Next. I think that every edition had some really awesome qualities, and every edition has truly awful design flaws. I don't expect Next to be any different, but if WotC is actively trying to incorporate the good bits into one unified whole, then I do expect it to be worth playing.
Maybe because I'm an old gamer and I remeber the glory days of D&D. I'll say this about the idea of setting... MEH.  See I've created more setting thant I like to think about.  I loved the old modules because they gave location that could become apart of your settings.  "Barrier Peaks", 'White Plume Mountains", "Vault of the Drow", "The Caverns of Tsocanth" and so many mor come to mind.  I hope they do it like they used too. Castle Greyhawk, & Ravenloft were not complete settings... they were iconic things that could be set into any world.  When the Forgotten Realms 1st came out, they were just that the forgotten realms of Greyhawk... a new and wonderous place lost to time perhaps. What i would like to see is all the good stuff from the various settings be put into a compendium and then you have a resource to build a world however you see it.

I mean you could use Waterdeep, with Castle Greyhawk over looking the port city and have Ravenloft be that enigmatic place that is all the stuff of legend and horror... the list goes on and on how it would work in world building.
 
That's just me though.... 
Maybe because I'm an old gamer and I remeber the glory days of D&D. I'll say this about the idea of setting... MEH.  See I've created more setting thant I like to think about.  I loved the old modules because they gave location that could become apart of your settings.  "Barrier Peaks", 'White Plume Mountains", "Vault of the Drow", "The Caverns of Tsocanth" and so many mor come to mind.  I hope they do it like they used too. Castle Greyhawk, & Ravenloft were not complete settings... they were iconic things that could be set into any world.  When the Forgotten Realms 1st came out, they were just that the forgotten realms of Greyhawk... a new and wonderous place lost to time perhaps. What i would like to see is all the good stuff from the various settings be put into a compendium and then you have a resource to build a world however you see it.

I mean you could use Waterdeep, with Castle Greyhawk over looking the port city and have Ravenloft be that enigmatic place that is all the stuff of legend and horror... the list goes on and on how it would work in world building.
 
That's just me though.... 


I could go for that idea, yeah.


Alignments are Fluid, meaning that they are based off of your actions, not your actions being based of the alignment.
Give them a complete game. Give it to them in as few pages as possible. A paragraph on what a roleplaying game is - roll 3d6, pick an adventurer, pick some equipment and you're at the entrance to the dungeon.

Then use that to sell them settings, extra rules, etc. But you have to get them to play first.

The Core Rules of D&D should fit in a small box, and it should be on the shelf with the other games. 

Setting rules can come in a supplement. 
Give them a complete game. Give it to them in as few pages as possible. A paragraph on what a roleplaying game is - roll 3d6, pick an adventurer, pick some equipment and you're at the entrance to the dungeon.

Then use that to sell them settings, extra rules, etc. But you have to get them to play first.

The Core Rules of D&D should fit in a small box, and it should be on the shelf with the other games. 

Setting rules can come in a supplement. 


So basically, give us a 4 class system, (Martial, Arcane, Divine, and Specialist/Stealth), with the sub-classes and extras in supplemental books, along with regional(Like Pirate ships, Frostfell, desert and the like) supplements, with setting supplements and their options being seperate, yet integratable supplements. But a small, simple quick Player's Guide, DM's Handbook 1 should be relatively small, with a second, larger, or maybe two more books for the DM, plus a MM, and then add more monsters in to the supplements, or into extra MM's. But make it so we can run the basic's (with classic monsters in MM1) off of the Core PHB, DMG, and MM1.

I think everyone can agree on that, that seems to be what everyone has been agreeing to around here.
Alignments are Fluid, meaning that they are based off of your actions, not your actions being based of the alignment.
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