Hex crawl style gaming

Ok first, et's make this clear, I am NOT proposing we switch the grid with hexes.  Hexes do have their advantages, but not really what I want to plan for when designing encounters.  When I say hex crawl style gaming, I mean reintroducing campaign settings that might not be incredily detailed, but have a grid or hex overlay with each hex or square maybe getting a paragraph of detail.  Again, I'm not saying this should be core, I think this should be an available product in 5e for this style of gaming.  See the Necromancer Games version of The Wilderlands of High Fantasy.  This is arguably the best d20 setting ever released, IMHO.  Each locale doesn't need 10 pages of detail, maybe just a paragraph or two of the general idea of what is there.  This would be great for those of us who run sandbox style games.
Agreed!
Even the 1e Forgotton Realms stuff included the hex overlays. MANY, many of us really love and want places that are good for hex crawl/sandbox usage. The 1st edition Forgotton Realms was particularly good at that.

Also, I like Wintery places... WotC seems to put a lot of them in their games, which is terrific, but do all of them have to be gloomy, almost post-Apocalyptic places? Vikings, Fey, weird ice creatures, etc are all great, but Neverwinter has become the disgusting pit of the North 

Please see my blog post which also links to others about the Hex Crawl... lots of people still want it!
sylvaeon.blogspot.com/2012/01/hex-crawl-...
The more things change...

I'm from the post-TSR generation, so I'd never heard of a hex crawl. I have heard of a wide-open sandbox, though, which seems to be the same thing (or a superset of it). I'd love to see supplements like this, actually. If WotC doesn't do it, I'm sure third parties will. And it seems fairly edition-neutral, to boot.
Rhymes with Bruce
The more things change...

I'm from the post-TSR generation, so I'd never heard of a hex crawl. I have heard of a wide-open sandbox, though, which seems to be the same thing (or a superset of it). I'd love to see supplements like this, actually. If WotC doesn't do it, I'm sure third parties will. And it seems fairly edition-neutral, to boot.

Tusz, if WotC made their sandbox/hex crawl stuff for use with DnDNext, but left it system neutral, it would make them salable to people that play other system!  That's great for a DM that wants to stat it for ANY edition or system. That is also revenue for Worc!!!

yes, you are thinking the same thing that many are, Tusz... I hope Wizards hears us.
Hexes, Squares, Triangles...  Why would I care?

Better yet...  Why would I want DnD (WotC) to produce them for me?

When you say "overlays" - do you mean like clear plastic?   Again, why would I want DnD (WotC) to produce them for me?

While, I like the maps for places discribed in the various books and modules/adventures, and the tiles, I don't "need" them.

Normal old grid paper has always been "enough." And now since the advent of GoogleMap (tm), I find I can "make" terrain maps with the click of a mouse-button.



  
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Rustam1, I make my own hex maps, too. Whether Wotc makes the actual clear plastic overlays (which can be helpful) or not is fine. Some people like to do hex crawls with established campaign settings, some in their own... some mix the two or do either at times. WotC WILL make a campaign setting... asking it to be friendly for hex crawl adventures is not unreasonable... it has been done in the past.

Since the beginning of the hobby, hexes have been the standard, not a grid, so there are many people out there that use them.
big big fan of the judges guild hex stuff
big big fan of the judges guild hex stuff


 Good stuff!
Even Greyhawk and the original Forgotten Realms had a similar style
big big fan of the judges guild hex stuff


 Good stuff!
Even Greyhawk and the original Forgotten Realms had a similar style



word i just lost an ebay bid on the greyhawk folio today as a matter of fact
big big fan of the judges guild hex stuff


 Good stuff!
Even Greyhawk and the original Forgotten Realms had a similar style



word i just lost an ebay bid on the greyhawk folio today as a matter of fact



 Bummer

last year I got the old FR boxed set on ebay to replace the one I originally had that got destroyed - keep trying for that greyhawk, Gary would be proud of you!
I'm still confused about what we are talking about here.

Clear plastic overlays to put over a hand drawn map?
Wilderness Hex Crawls & Sandbox-style campaign settings... not neccessarily a "hex" or "grid" per se
I'm still confused about what we are talking about here.

Clear plastic overlays to put over a hand drawn map?



the forgotten realms grey box had awesome maps w transparant hex overlays, so you wouldnt have to draw on the map. the copy i have they are long gone. in b/x and 1e (i dont know about 2nd or 3rd), dnd gave stats for wilderness speeds in hexes per mile, adjusted for conditions and terrain. judges guild had a campaign hexagon system, which was like 12 plus large maps. they had supplements with tables for random terrain, cities, lairs, etc in the hexes. quite cool
I'm still confused about what we are talking about here.

Clear plastic overlays to put over a hand drawn map?


As I understand it from reading about it an hour ago (so forgive my inexperienced errors), a hex crawl works like this: a campaign maker draws a map of a region. A hex grid is then placed on top of it (as part of the map, not a physical overlay), and each hex is numbered. The rest of the "campaign" is just an overview of the kinds of stuff to expect in each hex. So if hex 38 has a big ol' city in it, the entry on 38 would talk about the city and the various adventure hooks that might be there.

Then, your "campaign" would be a wide open sandbox, and would probably play out like the old episodic "wandering the earth" shows. Group of heroes wander into town, deal with whatever situation they walk into, and then move on to a different hex. Very player driven, with the DM working off of rough notes to figure out what's up the path.

Does that about explain it?
Rhymes with Bruce
I'm still confused about what we are talking about here.

Clear plastic overlays to put over a hand drawn map?



the grey box fr had hexagon maps,  plastic overlays, so you wouldnt have to draw on the map. the copy i have they are long gone. in b/x and 1e (i dont know about 2nd or 3rd), it gave stats for qilderness speeds in hexes per mile, adjusted for conditions and terrain. judges guild had a campaign hexagon system, which was like 12 plus large maps. they had supplements with tables for random terrain, cities, lairs, etc in the hexes. quite cool



All of that is what we want: random terrain & encounter charts... open spaces we can populate for ourselves and a basic setting to do it in. Actual hex overlays are a bonus!  Certainly the areas can be remapped using software or hex paper, in the style that has been done since the Judges Guild days. Things that make for a good wilderness crawl are all good to have!

This creates lots of room for DM creativity in making the setting their own

It was brought up earlier that a more "system neutral" campaign setting might boost sales for WotC, too, as people would use it in other games.
theres so much flavor in those 'wilderlands of the fantastic reaches' tables its just insane

I'm still confused about what we are talking about here.

Clear plastic overlays to put over a hand drawn map?


As I understand it from reading about it an hour ago (so forgive my inexperienced errors), a hex crawl works like this: a campaign maker draws a map of a region. A hex grid is then placed on top of it (as part of the map, not a physical overlay), and each hex is numbered. The rest of the "campaign" is just an overview of the kinds of stuff to expect in each hex. So if hex 38 has a big ol' city in it, the entry on 38 would talk about the city and the various adventure hooks that might be there.

Then, your "campaign" would be a wide open sandbox, and would probably play out like the old episodic "wandering the earth" shows. Group of heroes wander into town, deal with whatever situation they walk into, and then move on to a different hex. Very player driven, with the DM working off of rough notes to figure out what's up the path.

Does that about explain it?



Lots of sandbox/hex crawl settings actually came with 2 maps: one that was with and one w/o the ehxes... the actual "hexes" aren't necessarily what the original poster is talking about (although plasic overlays would be nice to have)... a hex crawl is a sandbox gaming setting, basically like you were describing (whether actual hexes are used or not).

Yeah, the actual hexes aren't what's important here, though these are the adventures I design.  What I mean is a wide open sandbox type campaign setting.  Not a single adventure site for adventurers to plunder.  But a whole wide open setting with brief details on each area for DMs to work with.  It is a "campaign" more than TusZ realizes.  It builds tons of story.  The difference is the players aren't slaves to the story.  If they're doing a long adventure arc then decide to walk away from it, they can do that.  The campaign doesn't die.  The adventurers jsut decide what tey want to do.  There's plenty of story available, but it's NOT mandatory.
I love hexes. A lot of it is nostalgia, but every hex had a story. You know, "in hex Z120 there's a castle (which you can see, because there's a legend on the side), and in that castle is an undead knight..."  And you could go there, and you knew it would be cool.

One down side: They got me playing war games, so be careful what you wish for.
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