Things you want from the 5th edition era besides good rules and splatbooks

I liked 3.5 and 4th edition both, and I'm excited for 5th edition. Most of my problems with what Wizards has done with D&D actually have nothing to do with rules. So here's my short list of things I want changed with the move to 5th edition that have nothing to do with rules.

Now, I haven't been on the forums a whole lot in the past year, so I'm a bit out of it in terms of news and Wizards' latest efforts to support 4th. I genuinely welcome any corrections anyone has for me. 

1. A license for 3rd party products that avoids the excesses of the OGL and the GSL

This has got to be possible. There has got to be some license out there that prevents the production of an entire alternate fantasy RPG competing with D&D and the posting of the whole rules-set online, but is very generous and liberal and doesn't scare away many worthwhile 3rd party companies with its restrictions. If in doubt, Wizards, err on the side of being generous and reasonable and courting support for the new edition.

2. A real, generous fansite policy, right from the start

I cringe every time I remember the "fan site kit [license]" debacle, and as far as I know the problem was never really revisited or fixed (please, correct me if I'm wrong). Wizards: you need a real, generous fansite policy right from the start. Not a license that fansites can accept so that they can use a few copyrighted images, but a clear, simple, liberal policy outlining exactly what fansites can and cannot have on them. And as I've said several times, it should be generous: you should explicitly allow the inclusion of a small amount of your own content if it helps make for a better fansite.

3. Better customer relations

I used to play a little Diablo clone called Torchlight. Before the game was released, I hung out on the forums. The developers of that game were amazing. They posted in the forums constantly. You asked a question and there was, like, an 80% chance an actual developer would answer it that day. I watched with astonishment one time when a person with an eye problem posted on a Sunday afternoon, asking that a feature of the game be disable-able because it made it unplayable for him. A few hours later a developer posted, saying that he just went into the office and added the ability to disable the feature to the developer console. On a Sunday afternoon.

And you know what? That game sold terrifically well for a company of that size, and up until the release of the game the forums were a paradise.  I don't remember a single troll, or indeed, a single argument. Things went downhill just a bit after release, but it's still quite nice over there, with the developers constantly taking the time to communicate with their fans.

Now, I know a tabletop RPG developer couldn't exactly do what that developer did with that eye problem person. And I know that these forums with probably never be as pleasant as those were. But I genuinely believe that Wizards would be a thousand times better off in terms of customer satusfaction if they constantly posted on the forums. Their modus operandi right now seems to be silence: they virtually never post, they don't answer questions, and the few times you do hear from an actual developer it's often over on ENWorld instead of their own forum!

So come on, Wizards: you've tried the silent treatment approach to running a forum, and it's earned you a lot of ire. Try the opposite. Post regularly. Answer people's questions when they address you. Let the trolls troll. The legitimate customers will see your interest and your politeness and appreciate your new openness to their concerns.

4. Reasonable continued support for 4th edition

I suspect this is already in the pipeline, since Wizards is adopting an "every edition of D&D was great" attitude now. But Wizards: you gotta avoid hanging out to dry people who want to continue playing 4th edition. Keep selling 4th edition PDFs, and keep providing 4th edition online tools, perhaps for a $2/month subscription (since, no doubt, the magazines are moving on). Don't require people who want to stick with 4th edition to pay for 5th edition material in their subscription to maintain use of their 4th edition tools. That would make baby kittens very sad.

5. Better adventures

Wizards, most people just don't like your adventures all too much. The writing and design are just not as well-regarded as those of your direct competition in Paizo. You need to change something, drastically, about how you produce them. As in, the people who are making them now, need to not be making them any more. Hire some new, really good writers. At least do something. Whatever other companies do that allows them to make adventures that everyone consistently regards as high-quality, stop doing what you're doing now and start doing that.
I for one would rather not have to buy multiple books just becasue the class I want is in it.

ditch the more unpopular classes from the playerhandbooks and put them in a supplement book.


therefor they would still be there for 5e. just not in the playershandbook.


this was one of my gripes about 4e.



           
a mask everyone has at least two of, one they wear in public and another they wear in private.....
1.) Great modules. 32 page winners in soft cover are fine with me. Good location and a good challenge to overcome.

2.) Core book(s) only need to play. Minis and DDI are optional. If the game was cut down to Core Rulebook and Monster Manual so much the better.

3.) I'd like Dark Sun to come back. I never got to play 4E Dark Sun and 2E was a challenge to run.

4.) A big new D&D Next campaign setting. One that includes the many features of D&D Next and has decent support (one or two books a year).

5.) New books on cool things--steampunk fantasy, underwater adventures, Gothic horror, planar adventures, Underdark, wilderness exploration, sword/sorcery option etc.
4.) A big new D&D Next campaign setting. One that includes the many features of D&D Next and has decent support (one or two books a year).

5.) New books on cool things--steampunk fantasy, underwater adventures, Gothic horror, planar adventures, Underdark, wilderness exploration, sword/sorcery option etc.



I definitely like those two points. We need some more differentiation than "FR, FR, Eberron, FR, FR, FR, Dark Sun. Oh, and FR." It's what I felt was most lacking in 4E.

Also, as I'm a staunch defender of OGL, we definitely need an equivalent, and based on some quotes from old Legends & Lore, I believe we may get one. 
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I wouldn't mind some cohesion between 3.5 Campaign Settings and their continuation in 4e. So in 5th I would like to see that if I pick up a book from either 3rd, 3.5, 4e all the information is the same and not changed to fit the new system.
Keep on the Shadowfell Essentials Group 2 - Azigen, Dwarven Warpriest Rise of the Runelords - Pathfinder 4e - Himdur, Dwarven Cleric

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A core roleplay system.
like the D20 system had a strong core and all kind of games have been built on that core not only DnD.

Around this core you could chose difrent options to customise the rule set for the kind of game you are going to play.
So people who like "realistic" simulation play could do so within the system.
but you could also chose not to use many of the detail rules to have a game that moves at a faster pace.

and if you don't want to create a campaign setting yourselve like this pick up a campaign setting and it would have the basic pre set choices for that campain included.

Purely electronic version (application) that updates itself via plugin (basically, if the rules are going to be built as plugins, then I want them to really be plugins) and lets me generate PDF or other e-book formats as needed.

I want to have the copy of everything I have purchased stored locally, and permanently, without DRM or subscription cruft. If I delete my stuff accidentally or suffer a hard drive crash or whatever, that's my problem, but if I buy into their game, they don't get to restrict my access to it later for any reason.
Good modules. I don't care all that much about buying splatbooks, what I want is stuff that I can use. Also, I use the word module, rather than adventure, because I don't want a prepackaged adventure. Instead I want something like the Keep on the Borderlands or Isle of Dread. No plot, just stuff I can use.
Adventures.
Dungeon & Dragon Magazine back in print.
A system that appeals to fans of multiple editions.   
Yes I'd love to see print magazines.
More robust digital support (both in terms of ebooks/digital publishing, and tools to support play).

Dungeon & Dragon Magazine back in print.



i think the chance of that is very low exept if you have a very profesional printer at home.

I know i'm probably in the minority here but i'd like to see a return to good solid story ideas rather than tactical movement systems and lots of expensive artwork.
Hex.  Hex > Squares.
Hex.  Hex > Squares.



I've no experience with hex so I'm gonna ask whats the difference
Keep on the Shadowfell Essentials Group 2 - Azigen, Dwarven Warpriest Rise of the Runelords - Pathfinder 4e - Himdur, Dwarven Cleric

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WotC selling the brand to someone who actually knows what they are doing.

Stop the H4TE

Basically the main diff is with hex vs squares you have facing and cover less distance if you have to turn or move around things.
Different Art: I genuinely dislike Fourth Edition art. Not only does it seem like it tries to hard to be "current" and "modern", but it isn't even all that good. Characters are often horribly disproportionate, and the colours are too bright and glaring.

Well-Designed Adventures: Since Third Edition, adventures have been rather uninspired. Other companies - like Goodman Games and Paizo - have managed to make ones that are significantly better. This needs to be changed if I am to buy D&D adventures again. Consider ditching your seemingly defective adventure design staff, and hiring some little known fantasy authors, as well as some writers from Goodman.

The Realms or Greyhawk as the Default Setting: I never found the Nentir vale particularly engaging. It has always seemed like every other genaric fantasy setting, only with less fluff, and stupider character races.
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Purely electronic version (application) that updates itself via plugin (basically, if the rules are going to be built as plugins, then I want them to really be plugins) and lets me generate PDF or other e-book formats as needed.

I want to have the copy of everything I have purchased stored locally, and permanently, without DRM or subscription cruft. If I delete my stuff accidentally or suffer a hard drive crash or whatever, that's my problem, but if I buy into their game, they don't get to restrict my access to it later for any reason.



This.  I want it electronic.  All of it.  The only physical books I have bought for myself in the past 3 or 4 yeats are pretty much D&D books and I read a lot.
Hex.  Hex > Squares.



I've no experience with hex so I'm gonna ask whats the difference


Hex models ranges and areas better, while being a royal pain for straight lines and right angles as you're guarenteed either wonky widths, partial hexes, or both.

Since a lot of D&D combat is played in the dungeon, an indoors environment prone to cramped spaces with rooms and hallways liable to exist at right angles if built by humans, I personally prefer squares to hexes for D&D, having tried both.  When possible, I'll use hexes for open fields and squares for dungeons, but it takes an advanced group to handle that, so it's been a while since I've flipped my battle mat over to the "hex" side

Ideally for me, 5e would use real distance measures (Foot or meter) and allow the system to be (relativley) hex/square blind.


I'd like the opening books to be written with an attitude that encourages roleplaying, not just combat -- that is, some page space in descriptions and examples should be dedicated to seeing characters, PC and NPC alike, as characters rather than just a collection of stats.  if 5e comes packaged with a module, I'd like that module to pay attention to the people that play a part in it as well as to the nitty-gritty of the dungeon crawl.

I'd like unplugged D&D to remain an option.  I understand the people clamoring for digital support and frankly I don't see digital support and offline capable as mutually exclusive concepts, but when I hear 4e players talk about their online tools and how the game might be impossible to play or nearly so without them, it sends chills down my spine.  Let's not go there.

I'd like to see 5e take the "Reality Simulation" or "Versimilitude first" attitude to design, with the understanding that some things will be abstracted by most groups  (I for one have only ever tracked ammo when players were separated from their usual gear, and had to rely for a short time on what they could scavange.  And I've never tracked food, though I could see a similar situation in which I might.  In 10 years or so of DMing and playing 3rd edition, I've seen ONE failed massive damage save and maybe two more trivially passed ones).  Perhaps some of the more corner case rules should be relegated to sidebars or "Back of the DMG" tables for the rare case when you actually want/need it.  However, I will note I said attitude, and the core of the "Versimilitude first" attitude is sitting down and askign yourself: "Does this make sense?" and THEN ask "Is it balanced?"  rather than asking "Is it balanced?" and then saying "Eh, we can make it make sense."

I'd like to see 5th edition return to "minis optional" gaming.  This sort of goes back to what I said about being hex/square neutral: the two sort of go together.  Now, I am often an ardent user of miniatures for D&D.  I've found they tend to enrich the tactical experience, especially for big and complicated battles.  However, I've also run many a pick-up session where minis just weren't an option.  The ability to do that is worth a lot.

I'd like quality in my rulebooks and suppliments.  While 3.5 was running, this was my biggest beef with it: Compare, if you can, Frostburn to Cityscape.  A similar effect can be earned by comparing Libris Mortis (Or heaven forbid the Draconomicon) to Fiendish Codex 2.  The later book is generally shorter and may even suffer from larger point font.  Heck, compare the 3.5 DMG to the 3.0 DMG and you'll see the cycle of loss continuing.  From what I understand, this was done to keep book prices where they were in the face of inflation.  I don't know about a lot of you, but personally I'd rather Cityscape had the same level of amazing content as Frostburn and cost a bit more than what I got.  Of course, it's really the Content that I'm after.  My favorite D&D book is probably my 3.0 Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting, which uses a lot of black and white art but has so much glorious detail...  I'd love it or Frostburn nearly as much even if their production values were more in line with my old TSR materials, they were softcover, or hell, if they were purple-inked mimeographs of typewriter output  (of course, if production values went that low price might become an issue, but assumign I bot it I would still enjoy it...  Substance.  As a consumer of D&D I value SUBSTANCE)

I'd like to see at least a marginally faster combat system.  Perhaps remove damage rolls (Dagger 3, longsword 5, greatsword 7 sounds just as nice as 1d4, 1d8, and 2d6)?  Whatever they do, the time it takes to resolve an average combat is something that's been a minor sticking point in every edition of D&D I've played to date.  I'd like a fight between 4 starting PCs and 6 generic kobolds to take about 4-5 mins, and a fight between 4 endgame pcs and the Great Wyrm Red Dragon to take... 15-20 mins tops, not 3 hours.  In both cases assuming that players and dm aren't unfamiliar with the system or their characters/monsters of course -- any fight time can be multiplied by TEN if everybody has to look all their options up before deciding on one each round.  I've played tri-stat dx systems, which ostentiably have a MUCH more streamlined combat system than D&D ever has or IMO even should, but it took just as long as D&D combat at first because of constant book references.  So, not holding "looking stuff up" time against it, I'd like 5e's combats to play out a little real-time faster than the equivalent combat in 3e or 4e.

I'd like nine alignments formed by the intersection of two axes (though I don't want them to have the kind of in game impact they did in 3rd) and the Great Wheel.  (I don't mind 4e's cosmology, but I'd like it to be the alternate as I've always found the Wheel and the lore and feel of Planescape that came out of it to be extremley compelling)

In small quibbles, I'd like tiefling PCs.  I'd like warlocks and truespeech if not in the core rules (probably not in the core rules for truespeech) then in a decently early suppliment.  I'd like the banished planar races to return, and campaign settings to not feel compelled to include everything.

"Enjoy your screams, Sarpadia - they will soon be muffled beneath snow and ice."

 

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THE COALITION WAR GAME -Phyrexian Chief Praetor
Round 1: (4-1-2, 1 kill)
Round 2: (16-8-2, 4 kills)
Round 3: (18-9-2, 1 kill)
Round 4: (22-10-0, 2 kills)
Round 5: (56-16-3, 9 kills)
Round 6: (8-7-1)

Last Edited by Ralph on blank, 1920

Tevish_Szat, I like a lot of your ideas, with the exception of damage being static. I would be disappointed by a longsword that does 6 damage - feels too video gamey for me. They've had optional rules for static damage in the past, but man, you lose a lot of D&D's flavor with that.
Interesting you should say that.  I admit, static damage is probably not the best way to speed up combat, but I wonder what would be...  Is slow combat just essential to D&D, or can it be improved without losing the flavor?

"Enjoy your screams, Sarpadia - they will soon be muffled beneath snow and ice."

 

Follow me to No Goblins Allowed

A M:tG/D&D message board with a good community and usable software

 


THE COALITION WAR GAME -Phyrexian Chief Praetor
Round 1: (4-1-2, 1 kill)
Round 2: (16-8-2, 4 kills)
Round 3: (18-9-2, 1 kill)
Round 4: (22-10-0, 2 kills)
Round 5: (56-16-3, 9 kills)
Round 6: (8-7-1)

Last Edited by Ralph on blank, 1920

1. PDFs or some form of downloadable dataset. There are tons of amateur programmers out there and this would allow programs like Masterplan that blow DDI out of the water to be able to tap into the information and really do some great things with it. I'd even be ok if you could only download that stuff as a DDI subscriber and all DDI subscriptions had to be in 1 year increments to avoid the syndrome of subscribing for 1 month to get EVERYTHING, or if you had to pay a fee for every file you downloaded. This would also allow tools to better tie in with 3pp products and homebrew material, since any person or company could make their own data files that interacted with various digital tools.

2. Bring back the OGL. Before you point out the problems of 3e, bringing back the OGL doesn't necessarily mean a return to 3pps that copied and pasted the entire SRD into their own PHBs. That happened because WotC made nearly the entire core series open content. This time they would not have to. The OGL would encourage 3pps to jump in, but by keeping most of the rules text closed content you won't see a hundred different spin-off games that all had their own PHB with minimal changes from the original.

3. Modular rules. It's not enough for me that the rules are good. I already have a good set of rules with 4e. What I want are rules modules that I can mix and match to get the right feel for my campaign (much like 2e had) without destroying game balance.

4. Slower pace of releases. I don't want another edition that burns itself out by releasing books faster than most people can afford to or care to buy them.

5. More variety of artwork. By this I really mean better artwork since I don't like most of the 4e art, but that is a very subjective notion that doesn't really help WotC. However, I think 2e had a greater variety in art and I liked that. I didn't like some stuff and I really loved other stuff.
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New books on cool things--steampunk fantasy, underwater adventures, Gothic horror, planar adventures, Underdark, wilderness exploration, sword/sorcery option etc.



An undersea supplement, ala Stormwrack, would definitely pique my interest in 5e, as I have ben running undersea adventures since '98. 


An undersea supplement, ala Stormwrack, would definitely pique my interest in 5e, as I have ben running undersea adventures since '98. 



Yeah, I'm really interested in this, would very much like to hear more about it (world, races, classes etc), you wouldn't happen to live in the greater London (UK) area would you?
Alas, I am in the States, on the east coast, so you're 5 hours ahead of me. My online undersea chat-based game would thus run on Mondays from 2am-5am, for you.  ;) I do tend to lurk in the IRC channel I ue for gaming, though. I'll send you a message with a link. 
Alas, I am in the States, on the east coast, so you're 5 hours ahead of me. My online undersea chat-based game would thus run on Mondays from 2am-5am, for you.  ;) I do tend to lurk in the IRC channel I ue for gaming, though. I'll send you a message with a link. 



Groovy.

Ever since reading the 1st Ed Hippocampus (sp?) and Triton (amongst others, Morkoth etc) I've been intrigued with an aquatic adventure/campaign. 

Interested to know why you dig the Aquatic action so much (me, even though born and now live in England, an island [yes, duh], I have lived in California and Maui, a bit of a Waterman)?
I would really like it if some kind of middle ground between the OGL and the GSL was made so that we could get good 3rd party support without it having to end up like the Pathfinder rebellion. Better fleshed adventures would be nice, too.

But what I really wish, what I would really want to have in D&D2013 is, apparently, a proved impossibility.

I want grayer morality.

I don't have anything against people who want to play goody two shoes heroes fighting against absolutely unlikable villains that do what they do for the evulz, but that's simply not my style. I would like to see more adventures in which the heroes are faced with difficult moral choices, where being good is not necessarily equal to being nice, where the villains do the things they do not out of selfishness or for the sake of being a bad guy, but because they believe it is the right thing to do. I would be very happy if the line between hero and villain was not so easy to distinguish, if PCs and NPCs alike could engage in a sort of political heroism or villainy for the sake of defending that in which they believe, not just defending subjective concepts like 'good', 'justice', 'chaos' or 'darkness'.

I really like D&D, but I find it lacking in the aspect of writing because it focuses too much on black and white morality, and I think it would win a lot if there was the option to make the protagonists face complicated moral questions.
I for one would rather not have to buy multiple books just becasue the class I want is in it.

ditch the more unpopular classes from the playerhandbooks and put them in a supplement book.


therefor they would still be there for 5e. just not in the playershandbook.


this was one of my gripes about 4e.



           



I don't mind buying multiple books if they're cheap. 


If you have to split the product into a series of easily-affordable modules, it gives me an excuse to swing by my FLGS frequently and hang out in a comfortable environment (well, one I find comfortable.)


Some guys are gonna be able to buy everything right up front, but they'd probably be able to afford that even if every book was really expensive.


I always prefer economic models where more people can afford more little stuff.          

Ever since reading the 1st Ed Hippocampus (sp?) and Triton (amongst others, Morkoth etc) I've been intrigued with an aquatic adventure/campaign.



I hate to keep hijacking this thread, but "You must be friends with this user to send a private message.". 

In the meantime, I started aquatic-themed threads over in the RPG Gamer Classifieds and the Previous Editions forums.

To stay on topic, one supplement I would like to see for D&D Next is the World Builder's Guide, as I mentioned Over Here .
I really like alot of the ideas presented so far, but for my own 2 bits, I'd like to suggest one simple "Pillar" for the new design.


Make it a role playing game first, and a miniature wargame second.


I really like 4E, but it plays like a minitaure battle game first.  Players look to their powers and count squares first, and roleplaying became something that meant "creative use of powers and min/maxing".  It was all tactical.  Even skill challenges tried to "legislate" roleplaying into a fixed system of rolls and rules.  Roleplaying in 4E seemed to have turned into what you do for a few moments between tactical challenges.


3.X was cool too, but it took way too long to DM & design adventures.  If I wanted a human thief as an enemy, I had to design the entire thing in order to get the numbers.  This was something 4E did well IMO when they made NPCs monsters rather than characters.
    
2E was the opposite of 4E IMO.  I loved 2E the most and grew up playing it.  The modules actually had story, not just intro text prior to yet another combat tactical encounter.  However, the combat in 2E was very abstract, and again 4E handled this very nicely with the Action types.

Actually finish the flipping Adventure Tools this time!  While content for the Character Builder came fast and furious for both 3.X and 4E, Adventure Tools chugged along almost as an after thought.  The golden rule here, keep it open and possible to homerule it and the PC Builders.  Hopefully Wizards remembers that without a DM, the players are sitting around twiddling their thumbs.

In summary:

1) I want to play D&D, not a miniature battles game.  Complicate combat as much as you want with realistic movement rules etc, but sell that as a supporting product.  The Core Rules Combat should be simple and clean. 

2) Bring back the story and the role playing.

3) Don't forget the DM in this edition!   
    
4) Release the rulebook as the rulebook and then walk away.  No more PHB3's that inevitably power creep the entire system.  Core Rules remain core rules, and anything after that is a modular plugin that is entirely optional.
 
YMMV of course.
I would like to see a return of the 2e Era campaign settings which have not been updated from 3.x to 4e (Al-Qadim, Ravenloft, Planescape, Birthright).
some people like the idea of getting the OGL back, though i liked many 3rd party publications some where a complete mess. or had feats in them that where totaly over powerd.
so how can wizards keep control and would there be a place for other companies or even amatreurs to create adventures and campaign settings.


well in one of the other treads sombody made a suggestion i realy liked.

based on the apple store system:
anybody can make adventures campaign setting and the like for 4th edition in PDF format and a suggested price to go with it.
these are then reviewed and aproved by wizards. ( total freedom to disaprove any product for any reason)
When aproved by wizards their put on the wizards store, where they are sold as digital download.
at a price of what the creator suggested +10%
the 10% would go to wizards the rest to the person who created the content.

and yes this would include you being able to get your homebrew campaign onto the wizards store.
and maybe make enough to cover your DDI subscription cost.


( note that i mention adventures and campaign settings, 3rd party or amateur publishers could not introduce or change rules,feats,classes or races and things like that, they could say certain classes or races published by wizards are not availeble in their campaign setting)
I haven't read all of the suggestions, but most of what I have read seem pretty good. 

I'd like to see Dungeon and Dragon mags back in print.  I don't see it happening as I suspect it isn't cost effective.  I am not a fan of digital magazines.  I am a fan of magazine websites that support the content in a printed magazine.

Modules that bring back some of the long out of print settings.  (and Dark Sun... not bothered about FR or Ebberon :p )

No extra DMGs and PHBs.  The core rules should be complete in the basic core books.  Anything else should be supplemental.

I like options... but please try to limit the bloat.  Easier said than done.  Especially when you need to keep producing books to keep your profits up.

No more power creep.  Too unrealistic?  probably.

OGL did a lot of harm as well as good to the gaming market.  I'm very much of two minds about whether a new equivelant should exist or not.  The idea of allowing 3rd party adventures to be sold digitally through wizards (essentially published by wizards) would be something completely different... and I don't see any drawbacks to it.  Drawbacks may exist, but I don't see them at the moment.

 Modules that are nice and crunchy but with a decent amount of fluff.  I like my crunch to be backed up by the fluff and vice versa.  (In fact this goes for the whole game.)
I have seen in various threads a few people request bringing back Dungeon and Dragon magazines in print.  Most are realistic that this probably is not cost effective, however I do have a suggestion about this.  I will probably be proved heinously wrong, but if you do not ask you do not get.

Have the magazines available in print on demand from the website.  You can request paper copies of the magazines, which you are obviously charged for and do not forget shipping charges.  Then a few days/weeks later your shiny good quality product is in your hands.  And at least WoTC do not have to worry about content sitting on shelves unsold and not earning a penny.

I am fully aware you can print the pdf version, but having an on demand high quality printed copy of your magazine of choice maybe nice.

/back to trawling threads.
I think the best way that they could appease all crowds would be to come up with and present side by side options on certain rules, and put a greater emphasis on house rules.

-For example show the grid system as a simple and structured method, then show how that would translate to a Warhammer style inch measurement system for those that still want minis but not grids, then state that minis need not be used at all, or in all situations.

-Show average damages and let people know that this could be used for a static damage system instead of the current dynamic system.

-etc.
What's his shin AC?
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