HEX

4 posts / 0 new
Last post
If there are only four creature cards on the battlefield and my opponent plays [hex:] will it destroy the four creatures or dose there have to be six?
They cannot cast Hex if there are only 4 creatures on the battlefield. Hex requires 6 different target creatures. If there are 5 or fewer legal targets on the battlefield, then Hex cannot be cast.

Wizards.Com Boards Net Rep

DCI Level 2 Judge

Questions don't have to make sense, but answers do.

If there are only four creature cards on the battlefield and my opponent plays [hex:] will it destroy the four creatures or dose there have to be six?


If you can't select 6 targets, then you can't cast Hex
To address a possible point of confusion here, targeting is checked twice, and each check works differently.

First, you must have a full complement of legal targets to cast a spell, activate an ability, or have a triggered ability remain on the stack. If you don't have sufficient legal targets, you can't cast/activate that spell/ability in the first place (or in the case of triggered abilities, it will simply be removed from the stack as soon as it's created). This is why the above answers are correct.

Second, they are re-checked on resolution. At this point, it's fine if some but not all of the targets are still present and legal. The spell (or whatever) will simply do as much as it still can. If in response to Hex, one target gets sacrificed, another gains Protection from Black, and a third somehow stops being a creature, the remaining three legal targets are still destroyed.

The latter doesn't come up that often because most targeted things have only one target. If all the targets (all one of them, in the usual case) disappear or become illegal, the whole spell or ability is countered on resolution. That's what happens most of the time, so a lot of people don't know about the rule for the case where some but not all of the targets are still there. (And a lot of people who do hear about it, mistakenly think it also applies to the first targeting check, which it doesn't.)

Jeff Heikkinen DCI Rules Advisor since Dec 25, 2011
Sign In to post comments