My group rolled up an Evil Party. How should I handle this?

34 posts / 0 new
Last post
Hey guys. First off, I just wanna say that I'm pretty new to DMing, and DND in general. But I finally got a group together and agreed to be DM.

Anyway, I just was wondering if you guys would have some general advice for running an Evil Campaign. For a little detail, here's what they all made.

LN Human Monk
True Neutral Human Druid
CE Elf Ranger
LE Elf Sorcerer

For Backstories so far...

The Monk is a City Monk raised in a temple and setting off on a quest of self enlightenment.

The Sorcerer Watched his family get tortured and murdered when he was a child and now is on a quest unleash vengeance on the entire plane.

The Druid Was abaondoned in the wild as a child of 3 and raised by wolves. He spent most of his life in the wild. When he was 15 he was captured by a group of dwarven slavers, and after 6 months as a slave, managed to gain the trust of a pack of wolves and slaughter the entire camp of slavers and returned to the wild. Because of his abandomnent as a child he never regained his trust of society and the slave ordeal only added to his prejudice.

The Ranger hasnt given me his backstory yet.

Anyway, I'm bringing them all tofether witht he "A Dark and Stormy Night" Campaign (They rolled lvl 1 Characters)

So basically, I was just hoping you guys might have some pointers for dealing with an evil group, because I really wasnt expecting them to make an evil group and I'm not sure what to expect.


57049138 wrote:
Thanks for all the feedback so far guys. I feel like I should mention a few things about when we did Character creation. We all got together last night and everyone discussed the characters they were making before they started rolling up their characters. So all the players are on the same page and I Ok'd it because they all really seemed excited about the idea. The Sorcerer is really into the idea of being this Evil Mastermind type of villain, and the Ranger really wants to be just a chaotic force of destruction. The Druid is just gonna be Along for the Ride (True Neutral, what else would his motivation be?) And the Monk is just gonna see the party as a good oppurtunity to see the world and improve himself.

Actually, my only real concern is how a LN monk would interact with  LE and CE characters like this. I'm not really sure where the line is drawn between LN and LE

So they really wanted evil for the role-play element of it. And I want to let them have that, I'm just not sure about the best way to go about giving a group like this an interesting campaign.

That's a tough one. Evil PCs are hard to handle even for experienced DMs and players. However, you only get experience by doing things.

My advice? Go with it, let the players try it out, but review things as they go along, and be prepared to hit the re-set button for the sake of an enjoyable game. The most likely way a game like this will collapse is that the PCs will go on a crime rampage, GTA style, and use up sessions battling NPCs and town guards. This can occur due to some minor thing like an argument with the innkeep over prices :-)

The simplest solution is to look at the backstories and for any adventure make sure the rewards of doing the adventure relate to the character histories. Quest rewards of money need to be better than what the PCs could get by mugging rich merchants (I suggest a dearth of rich merchants and shopkeepers in the area), and quest rewards such as the Sorcerer following up a tenuous clue as to the location of his parent's murderers might be just the thing to keep this team focused on the adventure you want to prepare.
My honest advise is don't play with those characters. You and the players need to collaborate on what you all want from the campaign. It sounds like you're a bit under experienced, and the motives of evil PCs could easily overwhelm even a seasoned DM who's not prepared for it.

If you're absolutely comfortable with it, then just roll with it. Give them a world that's not nice, where they're neither the good guys nor the bad guys. This way they can be a little heroic without being "good" and can be evil without risking severe plot derailment.

"Not only are you wrong, but I even created an Excel spreadsheet to show you how wrong you are." --James Wyatt, May 2006

Dilige, et quod vis fac

First, past editions's forum section is not here, sorry to sounds like an ass.

Second, as Cohen said. Force them to remake PCs, or give them what they want impliedly; a dark world, who WILL suck on them.
OR show them HOW the world treat realisticaly the consequences of evil. It will suck. 
Ubbergeek is wrong, this section of the forums is edition-neutral.  Your question is fine here.

As Cohen95 says, you and your players need to talk about the kind of game you're playing ('you' meaning 'all of you') before a single pencil, book, or laptop is lifted to start making characters.  If you don't want to run an evil game, then you aren't going to be having any fun, and if the DM ain't having fun, ain't nobody having fun.

A player should never be able to drop a surprise character on you.  You should always be part of the creation process, giving input and suggestions where you can, and saying 'no, that won't fly' if you absolutely must.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
My honest advise is don't play with those characters.

Mine too. I will not run an evil campaign. I will not DM for evil PCs. I don't have any interest or fun doing it. (But I also have the luxury of not having to tailor my games to my players. I cast a net for players after I have a campaign in mind. Players self-select for the game I have described.)

Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
Unless you really really really trust them with playing an Evil character, the best way to handle is to say "no" and make them play a non-evil party.
Epic Dungeon Master

Want to give your players a kingdom of their own? I made a 4e rule system to make it happen!

Your Kingdom awaits!
Update 5th Sep 2011: Added a sample kingdom, as well as sample of play.
What does "being evil" mean to your players?

If they crossed "CE" and "LE" off their character sheets and never wrote anything else in, would they suddenly become heroic do-gooders?

If you said "I'm not using alignment in this game," and added that you'd adjudicate the effects of any alignment-based attributes of spells or the like on the fly, would they be disappointed?

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals  |  Full-Contact Futbol   |   Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs  |  Re-Imagining Phandelver  |  Three Pillars of Immersion

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

Running an evil party is something I suggest you try at least once in your DM career. Your players may be talking about it for years to come.

1) This will be a major pain in your ass.

2) Evil PCs are not above doing evil things to other PCs.

3) The best thing you can do for yourself is to come up with a reason for them to work together. Being bound to service to something ten times as evil and powerful as them (like a deity/demon) is an easy one.


4) If they decide that being evil means regularly commiting **** and murder in town, well that should catch up with them pretty quickly, right?

Thanks for all the feedback so far guys. I feel like I should mention a few things about when we did Character creation. We all got together last night and everyone discussed the characters they were making before they started rolling up their characters. So all the players are on the same page and I Ok'd it because they all really seemed excited about the idea. The Sorcerer is really into the idea of being this Evil Mastermind type of villain, and the Ranger really wants to be just a chaotic force of destruction. The Druid is just gonna be Along for the Ride (True Neutral, what else would his motivation be?) And the Monk is just gonna see the party as a good oppurtunity to see the world and improve himself.

Actually, my only real concern is how a LN monk would interact with  LE and CE characters like this. I'm not really sure where the line is drawn between LN and LE

So they really wanted evil for the role-play element of it. And I want to let them have that, I'm just not sure about the best way to go about giving a group like this an interesting campaign.
You're going to run into a couple of problems by doing this.

- NPCs are going to be... killed. Or worse. So you shouldn't use any NPCs that you plan on staying alive until you know your party better.
- You're going to have to find a way to get your party do to stuff, since they're probably not going to save villagers from kobold raiders just because it's their job as heroes. You can either put someone stronger than them in command of them (it'll be pretty cool once they get strong enough to beat the someone stronger in command) or you can have them start at square 0 and have a pre-session where they think of a plan to destroy/dominate the world. You're going to need the pre-session because it's really hard to do sandbox, and, imo, it reduces the quality of the game (especially the combat encounters).
 
Get your Microsoft Word Monster Statistics Block Template here! My Campaign
What is it with players and evil characters? 

You can always (as mentioned above) go for the uber-evil dark world feeling.  Make a place so dismal that the only people who bring hope the normal folks are those just a little less evil than who is already in charge.  Throw them in the underdark or make a surface world that mirrors some of the politics of the underdark.

Jungles or primal settings have always been a decent counter to evil players for me.  I like to play jungle cultures with an indifference to alignment.  
Common place tribal customs may seem evil and vile to the outside world, but for them its just the way of life. 

I won't run evil campaigns anymore either.  They almost always dissolve into inner-group conflicts and RP frequently evaporates from the table.  It takes experienced and mature players to run evil characters.    
My group rolled up an Evil Party. How should I handle this?


Let them do it, but give them just enough rope to hang themselves with. When you have characters playing evil (and by "evil" I mean "insane" because that's how a lot of players will play evil) characters, they're going to need to learn that there are consequences for their actions.

If they go on a killing rampage (this has never happened to me in an evil campaign but judging from other posts it sounds like the norm), have a band of Paladins many levels higher than them hunt them down. Escalate the situation. Add tension. Add drama. If they don't like it, maybe they'll also realize that playing a homicidal maniac isn't the best idea. 

...

On a slightly unrelated note, don't let other people discourage you from allowing evil characters into a campaign. I've been in two "evil" (more or less) campaigns, and as long as the players are mature enough to know what evil actual means (again, not "insane"), then it should be a fun experience! 
The Sorcerer is really into the idea of being this Evil Mastermind type of villain,
Interesting but how does he plan to become the mastermind villain?? Dr Evil, Dr No, Goldfinger etc didn't just walk out and say 'I am now an evil mastermind, lord of all and fear me', instead he worked on peoples perception of him, developed peoples respect, gained money to becoe the master of a powerful organisation and BECAME a master villain. The sorcerer needs to do the same by subterfuge, garnering a strong repuation by performing acts for powerful people(probably evil people).
The ranger has the same problem as the sorcerer. He can sit on the tailcoat of the Sorcerer as a brutal henchman, performing brutal, mercenary acts as the situation requires but unless he wants to alienate himself from the general populace he must choose well when he can be brutal and when his actions would bring him into a position as an outlaw.

The Druid is just gonna be Along for the Ride (True Neutral, what else would his motivation be?) And the Monk is just gonna see the party as a good oppurtunity to see the world and improve himself.

As a true neutral, the monk could stand by and aid the group in their acts in order to learn what it is to be destructive, cruel and evil. The druid fits very little in the short term but long term he could be planning to use the increased position and power to commit a viscious revenge when it suites him. Short term he could be acting as a faithful (generally) servant to the Sorcerer.

Its worth noting that an evil organisation knows when to 'be evil' and when diplomacy requires 'acts of good' or acts of respect when done for evil masters. The Zentarim for example in FR garner a lot of respect among the less good aligned countries like Sembia(who are greedy and a bit mercenary) or among hundreds of human towns and cities where they operate, even performing good acts to gain favour.
Evil does not mean moronic, in fact they can be the most interesting characters ever but they must be tinged with sanity. I played in a Drow campaign which required the PC's to work together under a single house or face the wrath of the Matron mother (when in the Drow City) and work together when in the underdark wilds where there are other more dangerous horrors which require a group of well  cohesive drow for the characters to survive. We never trusted each other and were constantly trying to garner respect during the campaign but rarely tried to kill each other for fear of our own demise.

So I'd say the party must get these rather complex factors into their heads if the campaign will last and not expect the campaign to be an open check to act like viscious idiots in every tavern and encounter. The PC's must understand the groundrules...act like idiots and become enemy number 1, probably risk capture and execution and that you as DM will not hold back on this fact.
Explain this to the PC like "right fella's, you want to be a morally ambigious group. If that's the case you need to realise that acts of brutal violence will not make a good campaign if that is all you plan to do. You will need to gain strong (possibly evil) allies, or be clever and gain 'good' allies by lieing to them and helping them by 'acting' good and doing good acts. You will have to be careful to follow towns laws except where you know you can risk breaking them or you will become outlaws and may be captured and even executed.
To survive as a group you will need to work together overall or again the campaign will fall apart. If you want to do things without the other players knowing them you'll need to let me know by message(notes etc) but again remember that the other party members may be the only other people in the world you can trust.
If the party acts like monsters the world will treat you as such and the DM(me) will not molly coddle the group by ignoring public and visible acts of brutality and violence.
Is this understood because I want to enjoy the campaign, the plots, the cunning, adventure and intrigue. " 


As an experienced DM I'd not enter into an evil campaign lightly and I urge you to consider that fact.

Hope this helps.

Sounds like fun, certainly I've had evil characters before in a campaign but never the whole party.

I'd read some of the forgotten realm books and look at Artemis Entreri and Jarlaxle Baenre for some inspiration.  Just because they are evil does not necessarily mean they are going to go around raping and pillaging.

And just because someone is Neutral does not mean they cannot be friends with someone evil or good of course.  

I think above all you need to narrow down their personalities and intergroup history and friendships.  Try to avoid internal conflict and focus on external adventure challenges.  Of course its not going to be your usual heroic adventures with damsels in distress or altruic lets save the world.  Adventures will need to appeal to their self motivations for power and greed.

Overall its appealing as a creative fun campaign.

It could never work in 4e of course because well 4e you can only have heroes that are goody two shoes.
I think above all you need to narrow down their personalities and intergroup history and friendships.  Try to avoid internal conflict and focus on external adventure challenges.  Of course its not going to be your usual heroic adventures with damsels in distress or altruic lets save the world.  Adventures will need to appeal to their self motivations for power and greed.

Overall its appealing as a creative fun campaign.

It could never work in 4e of course because well 4e you can only have heroes that are goody two shoes.

Our campaign was based on the Drizzt Do Urden story in Menzoberranzen. We were in house Baenre and the group was a constant flow of backstabbing and power building in the campaign, it was in 2nd Edition and lasted for 10 levels with only 1 PC ever getting killed by another party member (I killed one guy because he was working very actively against me and had tried to kill me twice, stealthily, but had failed...so I got him at the end of a fight with Illithids in the underdark).

The characters had to build allies or they'd never survive but likewise you never trust the allies totally. Good NPC's were great because you could use disguise, play the 'good guy' and go and rescue the damsel, gain his\her trust then at the right time knock him out, **** the damsel (then finish her too) and leave with a story of drow attack and vow to hunt them down and bring back an enemy houses soldiers and get paid lots for the trouble.
Lots of roleplay and interaction, being able to lie is vital to the characters survival.

Interesting NPC's are very important for the game, very much like Vampire the Masquarade, another game I was the Storyteller for which involved very similar power struggles and group activity.

Would love to try a 4E Evil campaign. 
sounds like my kind of campaign - fun stuff.
A few years back we ran an evil campaign, a thieve's guild.  It was a huge success, lasted for a year, and is probably the reason I fell in love with DnD.  So I know it works, but there are a few specific reasons why it worked.  Here are some of the lessons I learned in that game.

First of all, evil campaigns lend themselves a lot more to the sandbox approach.  Think about it, evil characters are always 'doing' things.  Evil characters have plots, they connive, they manipulate.  The evil people are the ones who put the ball in play.  The heroes, at least in the beginning, are always reacting to the villains.  The heroes investigate the murder.  The villain perpetrate it.  So to make this work, you have to give players more freedom to make moves and manipulate the situations to their advantage.  You have to let them make the first move.  Talk to them about what they want to do, then let them do it, and adjust the world around them.  Let them get far along in their schemes before a hero or member of law enforcement comes along to check them.

Secondly, and this really ties into the first one, it helps if there is plenty of opportunity for the players to act independently.  In our thieve's guild game, we were always going off into other rooms with the DM, acting alone or in smaller groups, making moves in secret, plotting behind each others' backs.  It's where the real fun was.  One day, one of the players went off to the other room with the DM, and when he came back his character was dead, because another player had payed an assassin to kill him.  I know most people would say this is no fun, but it was six months into the game, so we could have a good laugh about it because the player didn't mind rolling a new character anyway.
Sleeping with interns on Colonial 1
Any party CAN work if the players are mature and follow the prime rule - after agreeing on the precise details of the prime rule for that party.

The prime rule is DON'T EFF WITH THE PARTY.

That usually involves things like not sabotaging the party's group efforts, not stealing important gear from other party members, not continuing to do the specific things that really aggravate specific party members, etc.

I've played several evil characters successfully... sometimes with the DM not knowing it... but I've never been in a predominantly evil party.


"The world does not work the way you have been taught it does. We are not real as such; we exist within The Story. Unfortunately for you, you have inherited a condition from your mother known as Primary Protagonist Syndrome, which means The Story is interested in you. It will find you, and if you are not ready for the narrative strands it will throw at you..." - from Footloose
No reason for the campaign to change too much.  

My suggestion is simple - give the PCs the option to capture the town, or several towns.  Then make the towns an important part of their gold supply (up to 1k/week or even higher).  

Now they have a perfectly evil motive for 'doing good.'  

"Lackey, why was this week's tribute only 1,200 GP?  Last week was 2,000!"  
"Sire, your excellence, I'm sorry but the villages of Thurwood and Zanbar had their tribute parties ambushed!  Local bugbears have taken an interest in the tribute wagons!"

Have their management increase or decrease their income (racism against elves gets an elven jemcutter to move, costing 100G off tribute).

With tribute becoming a large part of their 'gold per level' they'll do all sorts of things to make their towns more attractive and thus get more money.

Eventually you can have a nearby baron try to take over their land, having them oust the evil baron and try to reform his despotically ruled lands into productive money makers.


Basically, if you treat a group of evil PCs like modern corporations, you can have amazing success.

Also, watch the druid like a hawk.  True Neutral means powergaming, and powergaming druids are BAD NEWS.  In point of fact you're going to have a significant power disparity on your hands.  Druids are Tier 1, Sorcerers are Tier 2, Ranger is tier 4, Monk is tier 5.  This difference WILL BE NOTICED.
The best way to run evil characters, is to remind them that while you are evil doesn't mean you have to openly announce it. Lawful Evil characters are some of the most powerful and recurring villains in most univerces due to the fact that they either have postions of immense power, or that they are expert in consealing their own pressence of evil and their motives aside from in long term gains.  Thirdly, while they are evil, there are always friends and other resources that they will want to keep. Either out of geninue friendship, respect or love, or because they are too useful to keep apart and that they are willing to torrirate eachothers presences. Either due to a healthy paycheck, ones postional power and so fourth.


Once those lessons have been taught, the scope for evil has only been enriched by a level of maturity to plan schemes, not just murder. The only evil alignment that would have issue with this are chaotic evil whom are the sort of guys who you would point towards a target and expect not only him to be dead, but his family to be mostly dead, aside from the sister that he would corrupt with his own legercy.


A good evil party, or several evil characters could quite easily interact with other members of the group or run their own campiagn. Just prepare yourself for a lot of trial and error alogn the way and expect their motivations to be less serving and more self centred. Though crafty evil will often blurr that perception to NPC's that see them.  
The best way to run evil characters, is to remind them that while you are evil doesn't mean you have to openly announce it. Lawful Evil characters are some of the most powerful and recurring villains in most univerces due to the fact that they either have postions of immense power 



In the USA, most of them work in the financial sector.
 
And someone comes along to flame you for a classist liberal in 3... 2... 1...
Sleeping with interns on Colonial 1
I had a boss who might have been lawful evil.
Didn't read closely, but looks like you've received some good advice thus far (except for "don't do it"). One thing I would do, is remind them that normal laws of civilization still apply. The law is enforced. Murderers & thieves will be hunted down. Playing a quality evil campaign will require scheming and subtlety on the part of the PCs, not blatant open acts of pure evilness. If they run around raping and pillaging, they will be caught and killed. Force them to play it smart and it should be a blast.
"Don't do it" isn't neccesarily a bad idea, you know. This kind of thing can easily fall into the category of "if you have to ask, no".
Epic Dungeon Master

Want to give your players a kingdom of their own? I made a 4e rule system to make it happen!

Your Kingdom awaits!
Update 5th Sep 2011: Added a sample kingdom, as well as sample of play.
It's also important to remember that killing everyone at the bar doesn't serve a purpose or further a goal.  Even if you're going for a terror campaign, if there isn't a reason or motivation that is served by your act of terrorism, then you're clearly just not taking the game seriously.
Sleeping with interns on Colonial 1
So they really wanted evil for the role-play element of it. And I want to let them have that, I'm just not sure about the best way to go about giving a group like this an interesting campaign.



You do this the exact same way as you would if they were playing good characters.

Nothing prevents evil characters from realizing that _____ is a threat, going to its cave, kicking its ass & taking its stuff.
And then hunting down the next beastie....

Nothing prevents evil characters from running afoul/drawing the notice of rival factions - good or bad - while in town.  Or making friends/allies.
This would happen if they were the good guys, right?

Nothing prevents evil characters from saving the world a time or two - afterall, just like the good guys, they live here too....  The world ending?  That might throw a crimp in the parties own plans.
Just happens that the goodguys aren't on the scene atm.

Nothing prevents evil characters from simply stumbling into adventures.

I'm not against running an evil game. But I'm a little surprised that a new DM is trying to do it the first time around. Unless your players are experienced, it's likely to be a tough job. I've seen mature people get very frustrated and upset when Chaotic Neutral characters become very self serving or do things that are out of the norm for good PC's. You could loss a few people from the table if things get heated. The boundary between real and role-play can get a little mixed for players. The advice you have been given is sound. Good Luck.
Honestly, I dont understand all the hate for it, although i will admit creating adventures for evil PCs is more of a difficult task without a good amount of experience beforehand. Harder? No. I think having anything feel meaningful is more or less the same difficulty.

My advice would be to let them know as long as they have characters with motives is fine. A character who is outright a psychopath with no sense of subtlety, intellect or need beyond a body count would find themselves cast out even by the more sane party members. Ones that only can think about killing  wout purpose meet a chopping block or a dark cell for eternity for a good reason. Even the Gods of slaughter don't care about acts of minor body count.

Give them purpose, and play into it. Let evil destroy evil as well as good or percieved good. The Druid may have a hatred for all dwarves, but let him have a real chance for revenge at the organization as a whole, even offering a more ironic twist if you can manage it. (generally dwarves often face their own bits of racism in their world. Teaming up with a group of orcs who want them out of business entirely due to competing "trade routes" of demi-human trafficking, that sort of thing.

The Ranger could be a problem, but I'd recommend guiding it by using NPCs that can show him "the big picture of things" and encouraging him to pick his battles with approrpriate rewards. (yes it's conditioning but hey, it works well often)

let me pitch a full idea outright that could be taken for piece by piece if it helps.

They come across a very 'neutral' dwarven society (or similar or other race outright)that tolerates slavery due to indifference and convenience. a general classism-caste society, nice districts walled off and gated from the slums (aside from secret pathways) where the most well off welcome the PCs because they think they can get more of whatever their chubby fat bodies could want and their minds crave. While on some task of consecquence or lack thereof, they're approached by another organization that's been tryng to get in on the inside. the way to exploit this is some dark secret perhaps

-A war in a far of land that's their source of slaves is a farce and is nothing more than two nations swapping their poor off in collars once far away enough for anyone to do anything to stop it or know better.
-Outright every position of power is bought in secrecy due to pacts with devils who use powerful mental control magic to enable it
-Even in death the bodies of the poor and those worked to the bone don't rest - a necromancer buys his bodies on the cheap from the pauper cemetaries and often many cause havoc in the worse off districts due to lack of guards and care

 - just to name a few possibilities. The group trying to change this is not more or less better, but wanting to expose evil to allow their own opening, A thieves guild, a group of warlocks and their demonic masters jealous of their hated enemies success, etc.

Utilize their goals and desires, fashion a well thought out scenario around it in easily shapable pieces and you'll be on the ticket to a good campaign train no matter what the alignment.
Hey guys. First off, I just wanna say that I'm pretty new to DMing, and DND in general. But I finally got a group together and agreed to be DM.

Anyway, I just was wondering if you guys would have some general advice for running an Evil Campaign. For a little detail, here's what they all made.

LN Human Monk
True Neutral Human Druid
CE Elf Ranger
LE Elf Sorcerer

For Backstories so far...

The Monk is a City Monk raised in a temple and setting off on a quest of self enlightenment.

The Sorcerer Watched his family get tortured and murdered when he was a child and now is on a quest unleash vengeance on the entire plane.

The Druid Was abaondoned in the wild as a child of 3 and raised by wolves. He spent most of his life in the wild. When he was 15 he was captured by a group of dwarven slavers, and after 6 months as a slave, managed to gain the trust of a pack of wolves and slaughter the entire camp of slavers and returned to the wild. Because of his abandomnent as a child he never regained his trust of society and the slave ordeal only added to his prejudice.

The Ranger hasnt given me his backstory yet.

Anyway, I'm bringing them all tofether witht he "A Dark and Stormy Night" Campaign (They rolled lvl 1 Characters)

So basically, I was just hoping you guys might have some pointers for dealing with an evil group, because I really wasnt expecting them to make an evil group and I'm not sure what to expect.


Thanks for all the feedback so far guys. I feel like I should mention a few things about when we did Character creation. We all got together last night and everyone discussed the characters they were making before they started rolling up their characters. So all the players are on the same page and I Ok'd it because they all really seemed excited about the idea. The Sorcerer is really into the idea of being this Evil Mastermind type of villain, and the Ranger really wants to be just a chaotic force of destruction. The Druid is just gonna be Along for the Ride (True Neutral, what else would his motivation be?) And the Monk is just gonna see the party as a good oppurtunity to see the world and improve himself.

Actually, my only real concern is how a LN monk would interact with  LE and CE characters like this. I'm not really sure where the line is drawn between LN and LE

So they really wanted evil for the role-play element of it. And I want to let them have that, I'm just not sure about the best way to go about giving a group like this an interesting campaign.


I once had a party similar to this. What I did was made it so that the PCs would be forced to move around constatnly to avoid being caught by a good npc that was always a few levels stronger. This NPC was an evil-doer hunter and he kept tracking the PCs until he found them and fought them. After the fight, depending on who won, they would either learn their lesson and convert over to the good side and stat questing and helping people or they would become to self-righteous and would go about causing havoc. If the latter occured, I would give them what I called a cult quest to prevent them from mugging NPCs and ending up battling guards. The cult quest would be evil oriented and would end with a party of good characters trying to defeat them. as with the NPC evil-hunter, depending on who won the PCs would either convert or become even eviler. Once they reach a certain point of renoun, I always make them convert over or die. (In other words a bounty would be placed upon their heads and they would be attacked by like twenty bounty hunters.)
I think the most important thing is to have a discussion beforehand so that everyone is on the same page.  Making certain everyone is aware of how much pvp is going to be in play, what is fair game and what is not..  The biggest downfall to evil, or just simply greedy campaigns is an overly opportunistic player who subvert others enjoyment of the game because they had different ideas of how cooperative of a game they were playing.

There is certainly a place for games with plenty of pvp, but its very tough to repair a game after things break down because things weren't hashed out beforehand.
To be honest I'd run with it.

The players being level 1 evil characters are going to be the henchmen/women of some higher up evil character.

So give them a level 5 "boss" who will beat the characters to a pulp if they set out of line.

Now, the boss wants the players to collect some debts - a farmer, a merchant, a minor noble's son and a cleric. The players have to collect the money or there will be trouble.

This will involve quite a bit of roleplaying and could involve some combat - especially as the noble and the merchant are likely to have some kind of bodyguard.

If the players don't collect enough money, then one of the players loses half a finger... 

The beauty of the game is that if the players find this game to their taste, then you can carry on with it.
If they don't, they can change alignment and do a quest of atonement.





I played in a 2 or 3 year campaign when I was a teen (long ago) and we were evil.  As long as the PCs feel that their is value in keeping the group together then they will probably stay together.  We were able to keep it going for a while, but eventually, and this could happen sooner than later if the DM is not careful, one or more PC may decide that there is no benefit to traveling with one or more of his companions, or distrust may cause one or more to preemptively strike out at another PC.  When that happens the group will deteriorate.   As long as everyone knows this in advance, you can have many interesting and challenging sessions.

If you are too worried that they may lash out at each other, you could have a powerful evil patron (some demon or other power) bind them with some ritual until a predetermined time.  That way you can force them to work together until a major goal is achieved (which may end up increasing the friction and enmity between party members since they can't act on their wicked impulses), but when they've achieved the goal, you can release them from the pact, and see what happens.   Hey it could be a cool sociological experiment.

Just make sure you stress to everyone...play for fun even if you are evil.

Good luck. 

A Brave Knight of WTF

 

Rhenny's Blog:  http://community.wizards.com/user/1497701/blog