Future of D&Di??

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I'm jsut curious as to what WotC's plans for DDi tools and features are? The tools they have a fairly useful, and it works great as an encyclopedia.  But as far as I can see they've been really slacking as far as adding new features and tools. I get the feeling that things are really getting stagnant. I'm seeing tools being put out by 3rd party places for free, that are becoming more useful than the DDi subscription tools.
Stagnant ? I wouldn't say DDi Update stags. The last 6-7 Updates gave us a ton of Features for the Monster Builder, a new Equipment section overhaul, Themes, Custom Feats, Custom Items and Custom Portraits for the Character Builder etc...a lot of new Features rolled in in the last 6 months

I personally feel things are moving slow and would like to get Features Update faster even though i understand they have a small Team of Programmers probably but i wouldn't say they've been really slacking as far as adding new features.  They steadily produce updates IMHO.


Yan
Montréal, Canada
@Plaguescarred on twitter

they've been on a roll since early summer, day 0 updates on books and all the features Plaguescarred mentioned is hardly the definition of stagnant.

i've been happy with DDI for the whole year i've had it.
The new online monster builder is finally better than the old one. They are slowly adding new features and increasing value since the switch to online only. But slowly.... so slowly.
Certainly not stagnant and the current pace is positively meteoric compared to the malaise of 12 months ago.

WotC are behind the curve compared to some third party tools but they are catching up and I would say this year has been an overall success for all the reasons already given by others above.
I was unaware there was a future for the DDi.... but I expected actual usefullness instead of what is there.
Terms you should know...
Show
Kit Build - A class build that is self sustaining and has mechanical differences than the normal scale. Started in Essentials. Most are call their own terms, though the Base Class should be said in front of their own terms (Like Assassin/Executioner) Power Points - A mechanic that was wedged into the PHB3 classes (with the exception of the Monk) from the previous editions. This time, they are used to augment At Wills to be Encounters, thus eliminating the need to choose powers past 4th level. Mage Builds - Kit builds that are schools of magic for the Wizard. A call back to the previous editions powering up of the wizard. (Wizard/Necromancer, for example) Unlike the previous kit builds, Wizards simply lose their Scribe Rituals feature and most likely still can choose powers from any build, unlike the Kit Builds. Parcel System - A treasure distribution method that keeps adventurers poor while forcing/advising the DM to get wish lists from players. The version 2.0 rolls for treasure instead of making a list, and is incomplete because of the lack of clarity about magic item rarity.
ha ha
56902498 wrote:
They will Essentialize the Essentials classes, otherwise known as Essentials2. The new sub-sub-classes will be: * Magician. A subsubclass of Mage, the magician has two implements, wand and hat, one familiar (rabbit) and series of basic tricks. * Crook. A subsubclass of Thief, the Crook can only use a shiv, which allows him to use his only power... Shank. * Angry Vicar, a subsubclass of warpriest, the angry vicar has two attacks -- Shame and Lecture. * Hitter. A subsubclass of Slayer, the Hitter hits things. * Gatherer. A subsubclass of Hunter, it doesn't actually do anything, but pick up the stuff other players might leave behind. Future Essentials2 classes include the Security Guard (Sentinel2), the Hexknife (Hexblade2), the Webelos (Scout2), the Gallant (Cavalier2) and the Goofus (Knight2). These will all be detailed in the box set called Heroes of the Futile Marketing. (Though what they should really release tomorrow is the Essentialized version of the Witchalok!)
I was unaware there was a future for the DDi.... but I expected actual usefullness instead of what is there.



Are you actually using the tools at all ? They are extremely useful both the character builder and the monster builder. Both have come a long way over the past 12 months and both my group and I make use of them pretty much every game session along with the compendium.

For those of you with kids please check out the D&D Parents Group. http://community.wizards.com/dndparents
I was unaware there was a future for the DDi.... but I expected actual usefullness instead of what is there.



Are you actually using the tools at all ? They are extremely useful both the character builder and the monster builder. Both have come a long way over the past 12 months and both my group and I make use of them pretty much every game session along with the compendium.



You can't worry too much about ThaX.  He's upset about the loss of the offline tools and WotC's insistance on actually making a profit.
  TBH, I find both the character and the monster builder to be so slow and clunky (and sometimes incapable of doing the things you need them to do) that I'm usually better off doing it by hand, and I also get to use my own character sheet format that way (thereby avoiding the horrendous ones that come with the builder). Even if I build something in the builders I'll end up transcribing it to my own plaintext format afterward for the sake of clarity, completeness, and paper/ink efficiency.

  Sometimes they're better than the compendium for looking things up (it's often much easier to look up specific groups of items in the character builder than in the compendium, since the latter's filters often get confused or just don't work).

I ended autorenew on my DDI subscription today. While it's nice that it seems that Wizards is steadily improving on its software, the simple fact is that I just don't feel like I get a lot of value out of my subscription, particularly with regard to the tools. The best thing I can say about it is that it's saved my group from spending as much money on books, though my group is starting to tire of 4e so that's of waning value. The tools, however, just seem to duplicate what 3rd party applications already do better and they do so via an online-only propietary platform that isn't functional on the devices my friends and I are coming to rely on more and more (tablets and smartphones).

I realize these are old, common complaints, but there's a good reason for that. I don't hate D&DI but I do feel myself left with a little bit of buyer's remorse and a feeling of disappointment at its failure to reach anything near its full potential.
I've always thought about subscribing to DDI, but until now, I had no reason to do so.  I used Maptools as a tabletop, and all was fine until a few weeks ago, I could not get my maptools to work.  I tried fixing it, but it was taking a long time.  Instead, I subscribed to DDI and I'm looking forward to using the Tabletop with my friends in the next week or so.  

I love how everything is integrated.  It seems so easy to create maps, plug in monsters, even customize monsters and plug them into my games.  Having the PCs on character builder and being able to import them into the table top is also awesome.   I've only futzed around with it for 8 hours or so, but I've already been able to build 5 maps that will keep my campaign going for at least 8-10 sessions. 

If my players like the interface and the game experience, the subscription cost is well worth it.

If I compare it to 25-30 years ago when I actually played often as a teen and I had a Dragon Subscription and a Dungeon subscription, I'm getting a better value today than even 25 years ago.

 

A Brave Knight of WTF

 

Rhenny's Blog:  http://community.wizards.com/user/1497701/blog