Rhystic Study

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Somewhat of a wierd question, I think, but:
  Is the owner responsible for announcing if the opponent payed the mana cost?
Some in my playgroup just see if they tapped down an extra land or not then  draw a card if they did not, even though it's a triggered ability. When the opponent see's them going for a card, even a split second after the spell was cast, they then pay the extra mana to stop the draw.
In a tournament, if both players miss the ability, they will both be given a penalty (the player who controls Rhystic Study gets "Missed Trigger", while the other player gets "Failure to maintain game state"). If the problem is caught within one turn cycle, the ability is put on the stack. If it is passed one turn cycle, nothing is done with the ability (no mana can be paid, and no card can be drawn).

Staying silent is indistinguishable from overlooking the ability and would fall under this. Deliberately staying silent may fall under "Cheating - Fraud", which results in disqualifcation from the tournament.

Infraction Procedure Guide, Missed trigger
If the trigger requires a choice that does not have a default action, requires a choice made by another player, or requires no choice, but will have an effect on the visual representation of the game, and the error is caught within the scope of a turn cycle (see below for definition), place the forgotten ability on the stack. The player may not make choices involving objects that were not in the zone or zones referenced by the trigger when the ability triggered. If the error is discovered partway through an action (such as choosing blockers), back up to the beginning of that action. If the error is discovered after a turn cycle, continue the game without resolving the forgotten trigger. A turn cycle is defined as the time from the beginning of a player's step or phase to the end of that player's next same step or phase. If a turn cycle would end in a skipped step or phase (but not turn), the turn cycle expires when the step or phase is skipped. No attempt should be made to rewind the game state to the point of the missed trigger.

So there is no rule other then discussing it with your playgroup, concerning casual/multiplayer games I assume?

I missed that 2nd paragraph. I'll let my playgroup know about it. Thanks. ^^  

So there is no rule other then discussing it with your playgroup, concerning casual/multiplayer games I assume?

The comprehensive rulebook doesn't really address player communication. In tournaments, this is covered by the Magic Tournament rules and the Infraction Procedure guide. For casual play, you'll need to discuss it with your play group as to how they want to handle it. Some groups mimic the tournament rules, some come up with their own guidelines.
I'm sure that mentioning deliberately staying silent and drawing, is cheating will help solve this issue. I greatly appreciate this. ^^
It's quite easy:
"I see you just played a spell.  Are you going to pay 1, or do I get to draw a card?"
In a tournament, if both players miss the ability, they will both be given a penalty (the player who controls Rhystic Study gets "Missed Trigger", while the other player gets "Failure to maintain game state"). If the problem is caught within one turn cycle, the ability is put on the stack. If it is passed one turn cycle, nothing is done with the ability (no mana can be paid, and no card can be drawn).

Staying silent is indistinguishable from overlooking the ability and would fall under this. Deliberately staying silent may fall under "Cheating - Fraud", which results in disqualifcation from the tournament.

Infraction Procedure Guide, Missed trigger
If the trigger requires a choice that does not have a default action, requires a choice made by another player, or requires no choice, but will have an effect on the visual representation of the game, and the error is caught within the scope of a turn cycle (see below for definition), place the forgotten ability on the stack. The player may not make choices involving objects that were not in the zone or zones referenced by the trigger when the ability triggered. If the error is discovered partway through an action (such as choosing blockers), back up to the beginning of that action. If the error is discovered after a turn cycle, continue the game without resolving the forgotten trigger. A turn cycle is defined as the time from the beginning of a player's step or phase to the end of that player's next same step or phase. If a turn cycle would end in a skipped step or phase (but not turn), the turn cycle expires when the step or phase is skipped. No attempt should be made to rewind the game state to the point of the missed trigger.



I don't think anyone would get a penalty for this.  Rhystic Study has a may ability, and if the game continues with no one saying anything I would think that it would be assumed that they just opted not to draw the card or pay the mana. 

DCI Level 2 Judge

Rockford, Illinois

I don't think anyone would get a penalty for this.  Rhystic Study has a may ability, and if the game continues with no one saying anything I would think that it would be assumed that they just opted not to draw the card or pay the mana. 

That is the proscribed remedy for a trigger that is optional and specifies no consequence for failing to do so.
If the trigger instruction is optional (“may”, or “up to X” where zero is a valid choice) and specifies no consequence for not doing it, assume that the player has chosen not to perform the instruction and issue no penalty.

It also applies if the trigger requires no choices and doesn't affect the visual representation of the game.
If the trigger requires no choices to be made and has no effect on the visual representation of the game, assume the ability resolved at the appropriate time and issue no penalty. The visual representation consists of elements the players are able to see happening or on the battlefield, such as zone changes and adding counters to permanents, as well as life totals.


But rhystic study doesn't fit either of those. It instead falls under the section i quoted: triggered abilities that require a choice made by another player.
Ah, thank you.  I knew I was missing something.

DCI Level 2 Judge

Rockford, Illinois

It's quite easy:
"I see you just played a spell.  Are you going to pay 1, or do I get to draw a card?"





Not quite. Timing may seriously affect the net result of this card.
 
Check Rhystic Study's Official Rulings:
«You don't have to decide whether or not you are drawing until after the player decides whether or not to pay.»
 
Thus the actual resolution of Rhystic Study goes like this:
"I see you just played a spell. Are you going to pay 1, or do I get the option to draw a card?" 

See, you may draw a card. And you'll announce your decision after opponent announced whether or not they'll pay.
This might make much difference, strategically: they may spend mana in order to keep you from drawing, even if you had no intention to do so (for whatever reason).

Same goes with Rhystic Circle's resolution: opponents must decide first if they'll pay (in turn order); then you pick a source.
 
Rhystic Cave works the other way around: you announce the colour first; then opponents announce if they'll pay (in turn order).



(Other «Rhystic» resolutions are straightforward)   

If I steal a hundred dollar from a loot of one thousand, people might notice;

If I steal a hundred dollar from a loot of one million, I might get away with it;

If I wish to steal even more and still go unnoticed, I need to make the loot bigger.

 

Now you know why taxes always go up.

 

Looting: ''the plundering of public assets by corrupt or greedy authorities'' (Wikipedia)