Can you copyright your ideas posted in the forum for D&D?

62 posts / 0 new
Last post
Apparently Wrecan believes he can

community.wizards.com/wrecan/blog/2011/0...

Do you think this is viable?

Can you come up with a new magic item, new spell and then make it 'copyright' so that nobody else can use it except for the wizards of the sword coast?

Think its possible?
Ever wanted to design and build your own MMORPG? Join us at http://dragonadventures.org and participate !
Yes he can. And did you really need to make a thread for no other reason than to call him out?

That said, thank you. I've been generally unaware of that stuff and its been an awesome read. 
"In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move."-Douglas Adams
You can claim intellectual ownership of anything you create.
However...
WotC policy states that anything you put on their website becomes usable by them, and by putting it on their website you are granting them permission to use it however they wish. In effect, if they wanted to, they could take Wrecan's material (much of which is quite good, BTW), and slip it into the next supplement they release without any prior notice to Wrecan. I doubt highly that he would mind, but it is worth pointing out nevertheless.
So...do you own it? Sure. You can copyright it. But by sticking it on the website, you basically just gave it to WotC. If you cared too much about the rights of your creation, you would not put it on the site.
Yes he can. And did you really need to make a thread for no other reason than to call him out?

That said, thank you. I've been generally unaware of that stuff and its been an awesome read. 



I liked it too.

I thought the, no you cant use it, but only wizards can, was a little facetious and somewhat wizard sucking, but each to their own.

I think if he intended such the content to be unusable by anyone else, it would be prudent to include a copyright notice.


Ever wanted to design and build your own MMORPG? Join us at http://dragonadventures.org and participate !

I think it is fair.

The forumers retain their copyrights, but WotC gets to borrow for them.

I cant think of a better arrangement for the D&D community.

D&D gamers benefit from all the good ideas that crowdsourcing can produce, since WotC retains the right to include any of the ideas that show during a discussions (and even modify them) in future D&D products. At the same time, individuals with profitable ideas can still own the rights to create indy D&D expansions.

No, as you cannot copyright an idea at all. All that you can copyright is the particular series of words that you use to express that idea. And you own the copyright to those arrangements by default. So, for instance, I own the copyright for this post, and for every post I have made on this forum. Whether those copyrights are valuable is another matter entirely. But rest assured, if someone went out and released a book titled "joanne71's Greatest Threads" and it wasn't WotC, you could sue them.

Edit: Also, if you're going to cite the law, you should quote the law as it is now, not as it was 23 years ago. The US is a party to the Berne convention.
No, as you cannot copyright an idea at all. All that you can copyright is the particular series of words that you use to express that idea. And you own the copyright to those arrangements by default. So, for instance, I own the copyright for this post, and for every post I have made on this forum. Whether those copyrights are valuable is another matter entirely. But rest assured, if someone went out and released a book titled "joanne71's Greatest Threads" and it wasn't WotC, you could sue them.

Edit: Also, if you're going to cite the law, you should quote the law as it is now, not as it was 23 years ago. The US is a party to the Berne convention.



Yeah, but you can copyright terminology, if not systems.
Yeah, but you can copyright terminology, if not systems.


Nope, you cannot copyright terminology. Copyright extends to works only.

You are likely thinking of trademarks, which is what prevents you from making a third-party game involving beholders(TM) and illithids(TM), although it could have floating eye beasts and squid-faced brain eaters. And trademarks need to be vigorously defended or you lose them. Copyrights do not need to be defended at all for you to retain ownership.

Which is why you could legally create an analog of any game even without OGL
Note its still a buttocks load of work to do it. Basically a rewrite in mostly your own words. 
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

Can you copyright your ideas posted in the forum for DD?
Yes. You can copyright anything you write. Technically, it is copyrighted by the very act of writing it.

Apparently Wrecan believes he can.
He is correct.

Do you think this is viable?
Quite viable.

Can you come up with a new magic item, new spell and then make it 'copyright' so that nobody else can use it except for the wizards of the sword coast?
No. But you can post a new magic item, new spell and then make it 'copyright' so that nobody else can publish it as written except for the Wizards of the Coast.

Think its possible?
Quite so.
Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
copyright isnt as useful as some people think... its part of the reason there are patents and trademarks.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

Although it's important to note that game patents are nigh-useless, and trademarks require a high maintenance cost to defend.

And yes, he can copyright it, and yes, WotC has full rights to use his work posted on their site verbatim, as noted by the terms of use.  Again, copyright still applies only to specific wording published in whatever form, not the thoughts or ideas behind it.  The only way to really prevent the use of an idea in game design is to not share it and make sure no one else has it again ever... somehow.
Jackonomicon™ It's not always safe for work, but it's great for play. It's my blog, yo.
Although it's important to note that game patents are nigh-useless, and trademarks require a high maintenance cost to defend.



Yup which is indeed why making new games with functionally identical underlying combinations of methodology (mechanics) ... is entirely legal.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

It's sortof dirty pool, however, and most consumers really wouldn't buy into it without some exceedingly good reason.

On the other hand, creating a game based on certain principles already out there, but introducing "improvements" in some fashion is a slightly different animal, and market reactions may vary.  (See Pathfinder) 
Jackonomicon™ It's not always safe for work, but it's great for play. It's my blog, yo.
It's both a blessing and a curse. On the positive side, a game like Command and Conquer can't prevent a game like Starcraft from hitting the market.

On the negative side, it allowed Zynga to copy games almost literally from small gaming studios and then competing the small studios out of the market by throwing around millions in marketing to make sure nobody sees the original game and everyone plays theirs.
Epic Dungeon Master

Want to give your players a kingdom of their own? I made a 4e rule system to make it happen!

Your Kingdom awaits!
Update 5th Sep 2011: Added a sample kingdom, as well as sample of play.
Exactly.  

As an additional blessing, it does help bring diversity and quality to the marketplace for the consumer/end user.  In theory, any large company can be put under the table by some kid in a garage with a much higher quality product.  Social networks and other non-traditional forms of media distribution and information dissemination have actually made this easier to accomplish more recently, although incidents like Zynga still occur.
Jackonomicon™ It's not always safe for work, but it's great for play. It's my blog, yo.
It's sortof dirty pool, however, and most consumers really wouldn't buy into it without some exceedingly good reason.

On the other hand, creating a game based on certain principles already out there, but introducing "improvements" in some fashion is a slightly different animal, and market reactions may vary.  (See Pathfinder) 



Agreed I value creativity at a fundamental level making even a functional clone of a game I like - much less appealing

Hell all the D&D near clones out way back when with there house rules embeded were tacky not interesting... because of there similarity to D&D. RuneQuest inspite of similarities was vastlly different under the hood and didnt feel at all like an attempt to start with D&D and fix it - made it more appealing because of that creativity. Plus RQ took target with there design and actually aimed kind of like 4e does.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

I see this particular objection to the DMCs (and to posting one's homebrewed material on the forums in general) ocasionally, and it has always baffled me.  For one thing, even if I were an unscrupulous game designerr looking save myself some work trawling the forums hoping to get a bite of what I am looking for seems like the hard way for minimal return.  Theres a lot of forum to look through and finding what one would be looking for ('I need one more Ring for my article STAT!') seems like more work than just making something up.  

Secondly, there is just the plain fact that I have never seen it happen.  Never once seen anybody say "Hey, I posted my Magic Ring of Awesomeness a couple of months ago and here it is in this book!"  This tells me that this isn't something they engage in.  

Thus it seems far more logical that the offending passage is pretty much what some other posters claim it is, a means for WOTC to protect itself from claims of copyright infringement when they happen to publish something vaguely similar to someone elses idea.   
Would I buy it if a game showed up on the shelves with all the classes and  powers, feats and features all flavored as ancient celtic ones and with game world setting merged in including appropriate gods with the  attached divine and primal sources ... maybe but I can see making such a thing a lot of work even if modelled with 4e design guiding it.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

I have posted concepts and seen them mirrored in product... I actually like it and if my ideas influenced product thats rather good business as I am likely to buy.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

Thus it seems far more logical that the offending passage is pretty much what some other posters claim it is, a means for WOTC to protect itself from claims of copyright infringement when they happen to publish something vaguely similar to someone elses idea.   

It has happened in a few cases, although whether it was coincidence or the publisher poaching ideas is of course in dispute.  (duh!)

On the other hand, you're very correct.  It's entirely normal and standard and usually used basically as a defense mechanism for the host.  Use of such isn't at all relegated to WotC alone, and companies such as Paizo and Blizzard have similar conditions in their terms of use--it would be entirely lawful for Blizzard to log all the chat from say... a RP server and base their next epansion's stroyline on what they find.  

Now that i think of it, I'm both immensely curious and utterly terrified of what the result would be.

Jackonomicon™ It's not always safe for work, but it's great for play. It's my blog, yo.
copyright isnt as useful as some people think... its part of the reason there are patents and trademarks.



Depends on what it is. 

For example. I was approached by some friends to create a logo for their theater company. They wanted to pay me $1,000.oo to do so. I offered to do it for free, and they insisted they wanted to be a professional company, and pay people for their work. So I accepted, and we worked out terms via email.

I created the logo they approved and they started using it on promotional materials for shows and their website.

We had a falling out, and I asked for payment. They tried to weasel out of paying. I had filled for a copyright on the logo when I created it (For $20).

I went to a pro bono legal organization that helps artists, showed them the emails, showed them the copyright application, they wrote a letter. The Art Director who worked as a legal aid for an Intellectual Property lawyer showed it to her boss.

He looked at it all, and said, come to terms, and pay up, and don't break the terms, it's going to be much easier and cheaper on you, because if you screw with it, he can sue you for more then what you agreed.

I got my money.  
It's both a blessing and a curse. On the positive side, a game like Command and Conquer can't prevent a game like Starcraft from hitting the market.

On the negative side, it allowed Zynga to copy games almost literally from small gaming studios and then competing the small studios out of the market by throwing around millions in marketing to make sure nobody sees the original game and everyone plays theirs.


It's also pretty much how Hollywood opperates these days. Submit a script, get it rejected, and see the same premise make it to the big screen a few years later.
Personally, I make sure that any ideas I post on my blog here are something that I want to get stolen - if WotC develops elemental classes then I win. That said, you can probably get around this whole thing by having someone ELSE post your ideas; WotC doesn't gain any legal rights to Game of Thrones if some random person posts the text of it in their blog.
Fire Blog Control, Change, and Chaos: The Elemental Power Source Elemental Heroes Example Classes Xaosmith Exulter Chaos Bringer Director Elemental Heroes: Looking Back - Class and Story Elemental Heroes: Complete Class Beta - The Xaosmith (January 16, 2012) Elemental Heroes: Complete Class Beta - The Harbinger (May 16, 2012) Check out my Elemental Heroes blog series and help me develop four unique elemental classes.
copyright isnt as useful as some people think... its part of the reason there are patents and trademarks.



Depends on what it is. 

For example. I was approached by some friends to create a logo for their theater company. They wanted to pay me $1,000.oo to do so. I offered to do it for free, and they insisted they wanted to be a professional company, and pay people for their work. So I accepted, and we worked out terms via email.

I created the logo they approved and they started using it on promotional materials for shows and their website.

We had a falling out, and I asked for payment. They tried to weasel out of paying. I had filled for a copyright on the logo when I created it (For $20).

I went to a pro bono legal organization that helps artists, showed them the emails, showed them the copyright application, they wrote a letter. The Art Director who worked as a legal aid for an Intellectual Property lawyer showed it to her boss.

He looked at it all, and said, come to terms, and pay up, and don't break the terms, it's going to be much easier and cheaper on you, because if you screw with it, he can sue you for more then what you agreed.

I got my money.  


Oh I didnt say useless just not as useful as people think nor as broadly applicable.

  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

@OP

(0) there is a special forum for stuff like this

(1) this is the internet. I don't give a hoot about what the US constitution says.  You need to look at international copyright law.

What you're looking for is this:

(Forum Terms of use) The foregoing grants shall include the right to exploit any proprietary rights in such User Content, including but not limited to rights under copyright, trademark, service mark or patent laws under any relevant jurisdiction.


(copyright) copyright arises upon fixation and does not need to be registered ... Copyright owners can license or permanently transfer or assign their exclusive rights to others.


(Berne Convesion) The Berne Convention authorizes countries to allow "fair" uses of copyrighted works in other publications or broadcasts.


(Fair Use) Examples of fair use include commentary, criticism, news reporting, research, teaching, library archiving and scholarship.


To sum up


  • Wrecan has copyright (inherent as he's the auther) (he can sell his stuff, if he wants to)

  • Wizard of the Coast has copyright (as Wrecan sighned the terms of use) (they can sell his stuff, if they want to)

  • I don't have copyright, so I can't sell it. If I do, both WotC and/or Wrecan can sue me.



Inherently to homebrew stuff, people can use what they read here in their games (though technically, letter-to-the-law, it's possible that's illegal)



For example, when I started my guide to disreality (ref sig), I asked every person who's work I used, if I could use it.

No, as you cannot copyright an idea at all. All that you can copyright is the particular series of words that you use to express that idea.

the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works says otherwise.

For Example, you can't darken all the pixels of a photo with 1% (or something) to circumvent copyright, even though it's no longer the exact list of pixels (or words for that matter) you copyrighted.

Proving however, that someone stole your idea, ... that's a whole other story  (just like trafic law, it's not because there are no camera's that you can drive 120 if the speed limit is 50)

Personally, I make sure that any ideas I post on my blog here are something that I want to get stolen - if WotC develops elemental classes then I win.

+1.

... no, +1 is not enough. ...

+1 and a cookie
Qube's block builder: if you want to create blocks for powers, items and monsters for this forum, but don't know html
Signature in a box
For years, I've lived a double life. In the day, I do my job - I ride the bus, roll up my sleeves with the hoi-polloi. But at night, I live a life of exhilaration, of missed heartbeats and adrenalin. And, if the truth be known a life of dubious virtue. I won't deny it - I've been engaged in violence, even indulged in it. I've maimed and killed adversaries, and not merely in self-defence. I've exhibited disregard for life, limb and property, and savoured every moment. You may not think it, to look of me but I have commanded armies, and conquered worlds. And though in achieving these things I've set morality aside, I have no regrets. For though I've led a double life, at least I can say - I've lived.

3.jpg
D&D Home Page - What Monster Are You? - Stone Gaint

Scipio: And Chihuahuas have definitely improved in the "attacking ankles, yapping, and being generally annoying" environment. Me: OK, am I the only who sees an analogy between forum trolls & Chihuahuas?
Some of my work:
XDMC 19 (silver): A full fledged assassins guild (with stats, skill challenges, ...)link XDMC 14 (Bronze): a one shot campaign for beginning DMs/players. link XDMC 16: Paragon path: the Epitome: being better then all then any one else. link (note: this is balanced) XDMC 25: The Gelatinous Cube mount Guide To Disreality: a collection of houserules - Introduction & table of content
My ego in a box
who am I kidding? my ego would never fit in a box
the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works says otherwise.

For Example, you can't darken all the pixels of a photo with 1% (or something) to circumvent copyright, even though it's no longer the exact list of pixels (or words for that matter) you copyrighted.


Which doesn't argue against what I wrote. Try an example where you are not trying to repackage a work (which is what I said copyright applies to) and pass it off as your own.

Or are you seriously trying to tell me someone can copyright the idea of "a war in space between an evil empire and a group of monarchy-loving rebels" instead of just a movie called "Star Wars?"




copyright isnt as useful as some people think... its part of the reason there are patents and trademarks.



Depends on what it is. 

For example. I was approached by some friends to create a logo for their theater company. They wanted to pay me $1,000.oo to do so. I offered to do it for free, and they insisted they wanted to be a professional company, and pay people for their work. So I accepted, and we worked out terms via email.

I created the logo they approved and they started using it on promotional materials for shows and their website.

We had a falling out, and I asked for payment. They tried to weasel out of paying. I had filled for a copyright on the logo when I created it (For $20).

I went to a pro bono legal organization that helps artists, showed them the emails, showed them the copyright application, they wrote a letter. The Art Director who worked as a legal aid for an Intellectual Property lawyer showed it to her boss.

He looked at it all, and said, come to terms, and pay up, and don't break the terms, it's going to be much easier and cheaper on you, because if you screw with it, he can sue you for more then what you agreed.

I got my money.  


Oh I didnt say useless just not as useful as people think nor as broadly applicable.




I think the more accurate statement would be, People don't really understand the difference between copyright, trademark, registered and service-mark. 

When used correctly, they work like they are meant to. 
the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works says otherwise.

For Example, you can't darken all the pixels of a photo with 1% (or something) to circumvent copyright, even though it's no longer the exact list of pixels (or words for that matter) you copyrighted.


Which doesn't argue against what I wrote. Try an example where you are not trying to repackage a work (which is what I said copyright applies to) and pass it off as your own.

Or are you seriously trying to tell me someone can copyright the idea of "a war in space between an evil empire and a group of monarchy-loving rebels" instead of just a movie called "Star Wars?"



I don't think you understand. Or at least, that's the impression you give me.

George Lucas can copyright (And trademark) Star Wars, as the title of his work. He can NOT copyright the words Star or Wars. He can NOT copy right the idea of the story, like you describe it, "A war in space between an evil empire and group of monarchy-loving rebels."

You can make a villain in your story that wears all black, and is incased in life saving armor, because of things that happened in the past.

You can't use an image of Darth Vader to show people, nor can you lift text straight from the books to describe your black wearing life support armor villain. 

You can have knights that use a mysterious power, to move things, have visions, and to get in touch with their inner anger, but best not to call it the Force. 

Get the idea? You can use the exact same ideas, you just can't present them the same way George Lucas did. 

 
the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works says otherwise.

For Example, you can't darken all the pixels of a photo with 1% (or something) to circumvent copyright, even though it's no longer the exact list of pixels (or words for that matter) you copyrighted.


Which doesn't argue against what I wrote. Try an example where you are not trying to repackage a work (which is what I said copyright applies to) and pass it off as your own.

Or are you seriously trying to tell me someone can copyright the idea of "a war in space between an evil empire and a group of monarchy-loving rebels" instead of just a movie called "Star Wars?"



I don't think you understand. Or at least, that's the impression you give me.

George Lucas can copyright (And trademark) Star Wars, as the title of his work. He can NOT copyright the words Star or Wars. He can NOT copy right the idea of the story, like you describe it, "A war in space between an evil empire and group of monarchy-loving rebels."

You can make a villain in your story that wears all black, and is incased in life saving armor, because of things that happened in the past.

You can't use an image of Darth Vader to show people, nor can you lift text straight from the books to describe your black wearing life support armor villain. 

You can have knights that use a mysterious power, to move things, have visions, and to get in touch with their inner anger, but best not to call it the Force. 

Get the idea? You can use the exact same ideas, you just can't present them the same way George Lucas did.


Thank you for restating what I said. Why are you trying to argue against me?
the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works says otherwise.

For Example, you can't darken all the pixels of a photo with 1% (or something) to circumvent copyright, even though it's no longer the exact list of pixels (or words for that matter) you copyrighted.


Which doesn't argue against what I wrote. Try an example where you are not trying to repackage a work (which is what I said copyright applies to) and pass it off as your own.

Or are you seriously trying to tell me someone can copyright the idea of "a war in space between an evil empire and a group of monarchy-loving rebels" instead of just a movie called "Star Wars?"



I don't think you understand. Or at least, that's the impression you give me.

George Lucas can copyright (And trademark) Star Wars, as the title of his work. He can NOT copyright the words Star or Wars. He can NOT copy right the idea of the story, like you describe it, "A war in space between an evil empire and group of monarchy-loving rebels."

You can make a villain in your story that wears all black, and is incased in life saving armor, because of things that happened in the past.

You can't use an image of Darth Vader to show people, nor can you lift text straight from the books to describe your black wearing life support armor villain. 

You can have knights that use a mysterious power, to move things, have visions, and to get in touch with their inner anger, but best not to call it the Force. 

Get the idea? You can use the exact same ideas, you just can't present them the same way George Lucas did.


Thank you for restating what I said. Why are you trying to argue against me?



I think I made it clear why i said what I said in my first sentence, so do I have to explain that?
I think I made it clear why i said what I said in my first sentence, so do I have to explain that?


Yes, please explain why you felt it necessary to point out to the only person in this thread so far who has made the distinction between a work and an idea (and whose first post in this thread was to state that an idea cannot be copyrighted, only a work) that an idea cannot be copyrighted, only a work can, instead of, you know, directing your post at the person who actually thinks an idea can be copyrighted (by virtue, apparently, of a work and idea being synonymous). I'm very interested in the logic there.

I swear, some people just disagree reflexively.
I swear, some people just disagree reflexively.


That's ridiculous!  Wait... what are we talking about?
with all this talk about copyright and stuff anyone else reminded of the Mojang/Bethesda Scrolls lawsuit?

Play whatever the **** you want. Never Point a loaded party at a plot you are not willing to shoot. Arcane Rhetoric. My Blog.

with all this talk about copyright and stuff anyone else reminded of the Mojang/Bethesda Scrolls lawsuit?


Yup, that's the wonders of the incentive system for trademarks. When it comes to the TM, even the nicest, most laidback company will act like a d*ck, as the penalty for letting things slide is a loss of identity (see: Escalator).
I swear, some people just disagree reflexively.


That's ridiculous!  Wait... what are we talking about?



It's perfectly sane! (I think we're on cheese)

Of course, if you're concerned about the copyright, you probably shoudn't post your material in an open forum. Any forum.

Show
Of the two approaches to hobby games today, one is best defined as the realism-simulation school and the other as the game school. AD&D is assuredly an adherent of the latter school. It does not stress any realism (in the author's opinon an absurd effort at best considering the topic!). It does little to attempt to simulate anything either. (AD&D) is first and foremost a game for the fun and enjoyment of those who seek the use of imagination and creativity.... In all cases, however, the reader should understand that AD&D is designed to be an amusing and diverting pastime, something which an fill a few hours or consume endless days, as the participants desire, but in no case something to be taken too seriously. For fun, excitement and captivating fantasy, AD&D is unsurpassed.As a realistic simulation of things from the realm of make-believe or even as a reflection of midieval or ancient warfare or culture or society, it can be deemed only a dismal failure. Readers who seek the later must search elsewhere. - Gary Gygax. 1e DMG.

Of course, if you're concerned about the copyright, you probably shoudn't post your material in an open forum. Any forum.




And this would be the....(rolls dice behind screen)...correct answer!
Or are you seriously trying to tell me someone can copyright the idea of "a war in space between an evil empire and a group of monarchy-loving rebels" instead of just a movie called "Star Wars?"

probably not.

you said " No, as you cannot copyright an idea at all. All that you can copyright  is the particular series of words that you use to express that idea."



That's simply not how copyright on intelectual property works.
By writing the particular series of words to express the idea, you copyright the idea.

Or are you seriously trying to tell me someone can copyright the idea of "a war in space between an evil empire and a group of monarchy-loving rebels" instead of just a movie called "Star Wars?"

In theory? If Lucas was the one who came up with the idea of interstellar war*, then yes, if you made an interstellar war movie it would be copyright infrigment.

*: in reality of course it doesn't apply to interstellar war as it's entirely possible to come up with that idea of your own without stealing it from Lucas.
Qube's block builder: if you want to create blocks for powers, items and monsters for this forum, but don't know html
Signature in a box
For years, I've lived a double life. In the day, I do my job - I ride the bus, roll up my sleeves with the hoi-polloi. But at night, I live a life of exhilaration, of missed heartbeats and adrenalin. And, if the truth be known a life of dubious virtue. I won't deny it - I've been engaged in violence, even indulged in it. I've maimed and killed adversaries, and not merely in self-defence. I've exhibited disregard for life, limb and property, and savoured every moment. You may not think it, to look of me but I have commanded armies, and conquered worlds. And though in achieving these things I've set morality aside, I have no regrets. For though I've led a double life, at least I can say - I've lived.

3.jpg
D&D Home Page - What Monster Are You? - Stone Gaint

Scipio: And Chihuahuas have definitely improved in the "attacking ankles, yapping, and being generally annoying" environment. Me: OK, am I the only who sees an analogy between forum trolls & Chihuahuas?
Some of my work:
XDMC 19 (silver): A full fledged assassins guild (with stats, skill challenges, ...)link XDMC 14 (Bronze): a one shot campaign for beginning DMs/players. link XDMC 16: Paragon path: the Epitome: being better then all then any one else. link (note: this is balanced) XDMC 25: The Gelatinous Cube mount Guide To Disreality: a collection of houserules - Introduction & table of content
My ego in a box
who am I kidding? my ego would never fit in a box
Actually, you don't copyright that idea. You copyright that particular expression of the idea.

Ideas are patented.
Mudbunny SVCL for DDI Before you post, think of the Monkeysphere
That's simply not how copyright on intelectual property works.
By writing the particular series of words to express the idea, you copyright the idea.


I'm sorry, but you're dead wrong here. I could go out and write a story about a boy who finds out that he's a wizard, goes off to a magic school, and fights an evil sorcerer that killed his parents, say that I was inspired by Harry Potter, and J.K.Rowling couldn't do anything to me, even if J.K. produced a signed letter by me saying "I love the idea, I'm going to use that for my next book!" and there was a picture of me on the back cover, holding a Harry Potter book and giving a big thumbs up (OK, that last part may get me in trouble, but for completely separate reasons). It's only if I copy her work that I will run into trouble, as her work is protected (which should be obvious, as the laws only talk about "works"). The idea, however, is up for grabs. And this, by the way, is by design, not difficulty in tracking an idea's origin, as there are really only a handful of stories in existence, and all those being written and produced are just repetitions with the details tweaked.