Shield Push Clarification

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I'm sure this has been asked, and I found several threads that touched on my question, but no definitive answers.  So, apologies in advance....

If an opponent marked by me attacks a target besides me and I hit him with my Combat Challenge, then I can use my Shield Push to push him 1 square.  If I push the opponent out of range to complete the attack, does he lose the standard action?

I can see it interpreted 2 different ways.

First - I push him, he is no longer in range, he loses his Standard Action because he was unable to complete it.  He can use any other remaining actions, but may not attack because his Standard Action was used, and interupted, by me.

Second - I push him, he is no longer in range, but he keeps his stanard action since I interupted it before he could complete it.  In this case, assuming he has a move action left, he can move and perform his standard action and I have nothing to prevent this 2nd attempt.

thanks
I'm sure this has been asked, and I found several threads that touched on my question, but no definitive answers.  So, apologies in advance....

If an opponent marked by me attacks a target besides me and I hit him with my Combat Challenge, then I can use my Shield Push to push him 1 square.  If I push the opponent out of range to complete the attack, does he lose the standard action?

I can see it interpreted 2 different ways.

First - I push him, he is no longer in range, he loses his Standard Action because he was unable to complete it.  He can use any other remaining actions, but may not attack because his Standard Action was used, and interupted, by me.

Second - I push him, he is no longer in range, but he keeps his stanard action since I interupted it before he could complete it.  In this case, assuming he has a move action left, he can move and perform his standard action and I have nothing to prevent this 2nd attempt.

thanks


Interrupts An immediate interrupt jumps in when its trigger occurs, taking place before the trigger finishes. If an interrupt invalidates a triggering action the triggering action is lost.
Example: An enemy makes a melee attack against Keira the rogue, but Keira uses a a power that lets her shift away as an immediate interrupt. If the enemy can no longer reach her, its attack action is lost. Similarly, Albanon the wizard might use shield in response to being hit and turn that hit into a miss, or Keira might use the immediate interrupt heroic escape to evade an enemy's attack before it can deal damage.



Source: Rules Compendium, p. 195

EDIT: To put it straightforward, it's your First interpretation, because if you push the target away before he completes his action, and he cannot continue the attack because he is too far, his action is lost. 
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