Fortune Cards - worth investing in?

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With the release of the Neverwinter Fortune cards I was thinking about the Shadow over Nentir Vale fortune cards. As a DM I was thinking of getting some for my players. Do they bring much to the game? Are they fun?


With the release of the Neverwinter Fortune cards I was thinking about the Shadow over Nentir Vale fortune cards. As a DM I was thinking of getting some for my players. Do they bring much to the game? Are they fun?




No.

The only thing they bring to the game is making the turns even longer. 
I've found them rather interesting, but not quite enough to really indulge in their full use.  I've filtered out the ones that were too situational and award them as RP rewards, rather than using them as written.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
I've found them rather interesting, but not quite enough to really indulge in their full use.  I've filtered out the ones that were too situational and award them as RP rewards, rather than using them as written.


Oh very good idea... 

   Well, the good news is that they are not gamebreaking and you don't need to worry about your players having them.  Of course that is pretty much the bad news too.
   They are situational circumstances your PC generally can't take advantage of, and aren't that big a deal when they can.  So those that use them often forget to even check them.  And they can slow the game a little [which can mostly be prevented by having the player switch cards at the end of his turn instead of the start], but they are mostly just not a big deal.
    I am sure WOTC will endorse you passing out cards to the best player/bribe to the DM/player who has not got a card yet basis.  They will need to buy 2 or 3 packets to have a legal deck.  And having just the right card at just the right time can be great.  So if you think your players would like them, give it a try. 
They add a little bit of time to our combats, but the time they add has always been accompanied by fun. It is neat having unorthodox choices. We like them.
Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
Yeah, they are a fun investment.
I've watched my players play with them, and my opinion is that they rarely do anything signifigant enough to justify their existence.  Frequently, my players forget to draw them at all.  Really, thery are only there at all because one particular player seems to love them.

I own 4 packs that I received for DMing at a local convention.

I feel like I overpaid.

EDIT: I HAVE found a use for them, though.

I needed more bookmarks.
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Alot of players like them alot, alot don't.

They add almost no time to a turn, max a handful of seconds, they don't add power creep, they're very situational and they don't unbalance anything.

For what they add to a game, I think they're ludicrously overpriced. I bought a bunch thinking they'd add some fun but find them to be a dead space on the table 99% of the time. I just never use them and find them annoying to pay attention too.

That being said I know players at my table that have a lot of fun with them and enjoy having them, so it's perspective mostly, buy some consider it a donation to WotC and DnD. Make it a ommunity pile to pull from, if anyone likes them they can get some packs and add them to their own game, the rest can go without or stick to the community pile.
   Well, the good news is that they are not gamebreaking and you don't need to worry about your players having them.



No.

Most of them aren't broken. 

Proceed with caution.
I have used them on occasion as an alternate form of treasure. They work ok, but really nothing that I've found too useful. I like collecting them though...
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I have used them on occasion as an alternate form of treasure.

You use them as treasure? Are your players okay with that? 'Cause I don't find them to be something I would be willing to substitute in-game treasure for.

Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
I still use regular treasure, but use the cards as extra treasure.
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Generally, I have mostly heard neutral and negative reviews of the cards.  What I do not like is that they add a benefit to PCs with no real cost - meaning that PCs that have access to them find challenges easier than other PCs if they manage to get any beefit out of the cards at all.

I believe these cards are a test run for core mechanics in 5E, like some of the later books in 3E were a test run of character design concepts for 4E. As I personally find that a hand of cards gets in the way of role playing, I discourage people from buying them as I do not want to see a hand of cards incorporated into D&D's 5E design.    
D&D & Boardgames If I have everything I need to run great games for many years without repeating stuff, why do I need to buy anything right now?
I allow my players to use them at the cost of a feat. One of my players took me up on it. A couple levels later, he's thinking of retraining.

I personally do not enjoy them, and do not use them when they're available - my characters have enough interesting stuff they can do with their actual abilities and Page 42.
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We run RPGA games, so we have to support the use of Fortune cards.

I was initially very skeptical of the cards. I don't want D&D to become Magic.

However.

They are indeed very situational, but at least 2 PCs have been saved from death by quick use of Fortune Cards.

They are an inexpensive way to support our local game shop, and I am glad for that. Having a $4 item that players can buy when they want to support the shop financially is great. A set of dice is >$10, so this is a good, low-cost item. It's also a good stocking-stuffer I can recommend for the holidays.

The promo cards are very motivating to players. We have several left over from previous seasons of Encounters. I use them as incentives and giveaways. Our DMs also give a deck of fortune cards to the under-15 players.

We forget to draw them pretty often, but don't mind when that happens.

Some of them are filler. I have one card that I keep reading to try and figure out how, exactly, it's a benefit to anyone. Sadly, I have two copies of this card, and when I don't sort out my deck properly, I end up accidentally playing it.
I don't want D&D to become Magic.

Although I'm not an MtG player, I'd be ok with that: Magic is fast, streamlined, intuitive, gorgeously illustrated, fun and generally useful. However, fortune cards are not that. They are like... anti-Magic.