Mordenkainen's Mystic Emporium: "The book now includes some new material"

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From today's rule of 3: "The book now includes some new material"

The implication of this: it didn't actually have new material in it before.  Another book of O4e errata we would have to pay for, no wonder is was scrapped along with the Class Compendium.  Looking forward to finding out what the ratio of new to reprited content is now that they've taken all this extra time on it.
Huh, no it doesn't imply that. It reads as if they added to the book after it was pulled. Thus the material is "new" to that book.
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wow, way to go out of your way for a negative assumption.

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Huh, no it doesn't imply that. It reads as if they added to the book after it was pulled. Thus the material is "new" to that book.



That's the way I took it as well. More importantly from my point of view is that this book will only be available from game stores.

I sadly gave up on my game store a few years back when the supply from WotC became irregular at best, making the trip no longer worthwhile so I'm very disappointed this book will not be on Amazon. As something I had pre-ordered before it was pulled, the fact that it is not available via "giant outlets" means I likely won't buy it.

Are WotC trying to drive customers away? This makes absolutely no sense to me. Can anyone explain this decision?
Neat, I'll have to pay some 30% more to get this book since FLGSs have rip-off prices compared to net stores.
I took it to mean it has material that is New to the book, but it may also mean there is something beyond the standards of More items. There may be a new type of item like when they added tattoos or boons. We may find something more along the lines of Threats to the Nentir Vale with more story on each item...

Either way it does not mean, old items updated, thats just silly.
In the Nentir Vale, all injured creatures are required to wear a name tag!
Are WotC trying to drive customers away? This makes absolutely no sense to me. Can anyone explain this decision?



Simple: based on their previous products, they have an idea of how many copies this book will sell, and it isn't enough to justify printing the same number of books as they've been producing, and so with a more limited release, they've got to keep those product where they'll sell the best.
I don't really know much about this book. How is this different from AV1 and AV2? Also, Why did they pull those books?
Neat, I'll have to pay some 30% more to get this book since FLGSs have rip-off prices compared to net stores.

"Rip-off" = List prices + possible tax? So the list price of D&D products should be about ~75% of what they are now to have value? (An honest question, though I find the implication amazing.)
Simple: based on their previous products, they have an idea of how many copies this book will sell, and it isn't enough to justify printing the same number of books as they've been producing, and so with a more limited release, they've got to keep those product where they'll sell the best.

The places with "rip-off" prices (you know... list prices) are where they will sell the best?

Yeah, it went down like this in Renton:
Frown: We printed 50k but only sold 20k to big chains and 20k to FLGSs!
Money mouth: Let's only print 20k and send them all to FLGSs! That is where they will sell the best, and our players can feel ripped off!
Cool: That will certainly maximize our profits! 
 
A slightly more rational explanation is that WotC is heavily trying to make inroads into and bolster stores where people really play, or at least where one may encounter humans who do play. This will get new folks to actually start playing the game and will grow the core audience (who can then get milked for DDI accounts). Beyond "organized play", WotC tried to sweeten the pot with Fortune Cards, and haven't given up on that yet as seen by the releases coming up and the ToC. But Fortune Cards are too focused, rather polarizing, and not for everyone (and, IMHO, badly executed). It's hard to space out about cool Fortune Card decks. What will work better? An exclusive book of crunchy but mainly inessential options for everyone! That will net not only real humans who show up to interact with other humans, but will also be a bone thrown to grognard mutants (such as yours truly) who utilize DDI accounts! So both new folks (who apparently feel ripped off by paying list price) and continuing mutants (who DDI it) feel included. And if new folks want, they can pay a nominal fee every month/quarter/year and have that equipment right on their efficiently Silverlighted character sheet! Ta-Da! They are now milked mutants (like me) who can complain on these boards like everyone else. Mission Accomplished.
D&DNext: HTFU Edition
Simple: based on their previous products, they have an idea of how many copies this book will sell, and it isn't enough to justify printing the same number of books as they've been producing, and so with a more limited release, they've got to keep those product where they'll sell the best.


I wonder if it's even WotC's choice, or if Amazon/Walmart/etc. are just not interested in stocking a product at such low numbers. Big retailers generally need to stock a certain quantity of any given product to actually make it worth even listing it (because that costs money).

So, this "hey, we're doing the FLGSs a favour" thing may just be the (less shareholder-upsetting) cover for "the big retailers don't think we're worth their time anymore".

(And yes, I'm aware this is just rather cynical speculation. I'm not saying I have any real reason to think this is what's happening. I'd be very happy if someone could come up with a good reason why this is unlikely to be the case.)
"There's an old saying that all it takes for evil to triumph is that good people do nothing. I've always had a problem with that. If you do nothing to oppose evil, then how are you 'good'? To turn aside and allow evil to flourish is to collaborate with it. You ask for mercy. You claim you have done nothing. That 'nothing' is why you deserve no mercy." - Lorian Karthfaerr, drow paladin of Avandra Robin Laws says I'm a Storyteller:
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You're more inclined toward the role playing side of the equation and less interested in numbers or experience points. You're quick to compromise if you can help move the story forward, and get bored when the game slows down for a long planning session. You want to play out a story that moves like it's orchestrated by a skilled novelist or film director. Storyteller 92% Tactician 83% Method Actor 75% Butt-Kicker 67% Power Gamer 67% Specialist 58% Casual Gamer 8%
I wonder if it's even WotC's choice, or if Amazon/Walmart/etc. are just not interested in stocking a product at such low numbers. Big retailers generally need to stock a certain quantity of any given product to actually make it worth even listing it (because that costs money).

If this was true, what would Amazon.com sell? The point of their business model is that they have a giant variety of stuff that they just need to warehouse. Yes, that costs money. But their inventory/distribution system can keep track of a million+ products, and there is no evidence that Amazon strips out titles that fall under a certain number, or that stay at a certain number for a given period of time. 

If your scenario was the case, Amazon would have zero weird and obscure titles. Amazon does have such things. Oh, look! There is only 1 copy left of Bestseller's rank #977,886, the 2005 edition of "Prisons and Jail: A Deterrent to Crime?" Also, Amazon still has copies of the PHBR: Tieflings book (bestseller # 284,744) and they have just 12... but there are "more on the way". Amazon just has a _few copies_ of niche titles, but they have 'em. I think it is reasonable to assume that MME would sell more than the sample nonfiction title I provided, and probably more than PHBR: Tieflings.

"Well, maybe that crime book is a high-margin product so they can keep fewer of 'em!" Discounting/margins have little to do with it, as Amazon determines that themselves based on expected volumes, etc. like any other business, and _they_ determine the final cost. "Well, maybe it's a really dense product so that cubic footage makes more money than the cubic footage for a stack of MME because they have to do that for their warehousing!" C'mon. There is no evidence that Amazon is choosy about products based on their density and dimensions due to warehouse space limitations.

If WotC DID have overprinting problems in the past and this was a normal release, they would just print less and allot Amazon an amount of the product to better match expected sales. Instead WotC are giving Amazon NONE of the MME book. This implies that WotC is not forced to do so, but has instead made a deliberate choice. Why would they make that choice? See my other post above.
D&DNext: HTFU Edition
Seems odd that Amazon would make the decision given they are listing every other D&D release including the projected elemental book for next year.

If it was a commercial/financial decision by WotC then fair enough, I just wanted to make the point here that a customer who has bought every single 4E release (ie. me) is making the convenience/financial decision not to buy this book. It makes no sense to me to keep this away from big retailers but hey, I'm not an accountant and I don't work in WotC.

Hope it makes sense to them when they're counting up the lost sales from people who can't/don't shop at game stores.
Maybe the lower print run is from the Item Rarity perspective of "this is a book for DMs" rather than "this is a book for players" rather than the how the Adventurer's Vault books were more positioned for players.
“If the computer or the game designer is having more fun than the player, you have made a terrible mistake.” -Sid Meier
the fact that it is not available via "giant outlets" means I likely won't buy it.

Are WotC trying to drive customers away? This makes absolutely no sense to me. Can anyone explain this decision?

It's likely that FLGS's are essential to obtaining/retaining RPG customers (similar to what the comic book industry discovered... and RPG's are much more social than comic books). Put the FLGS's out of business, and the RPG industry could theoretically crash. Invest in them, and it's possible that the customer base grows. I'm interested to see how the strategy plays out.
the fact that it is not available via "giant outlets" means I likely won't buy it.

Are WotC trying to drive customers away? This makes absolutely no sense to me. Can anyone explain this decision?

It's likely that FLGS's are essential to obtaining/retaining RPG customers (similar to what the comic book industry discovered... and RPG's are much more social than comic books). Put the FLGS's out of business, and the RPG industry could theoretically crash. Invest in them, and it's possible that the customer base grows. I'm interested to see how the strategy plays out.



i think this is an excellent theory! i understand the implication, without knowing the reference; what happened with the comic book industry ?
Bane of Gnomes. "An angel of snuggles is a bad match for evil gods." -Mike Mearls (Worlds&Monsters, p.72)
If this was true, what would Amazon.com sell? ... This implies that WotC is not forced to do so, but has instead made a deliberate choice. Why would they make that choice? See my other post above.


You're probably right. I'm just trying to make sense of something that doesn't seem to make any sense.

It's likely that FLGS's are essential to obtaining/retaining RPG customers


If that were true, there'd be no D&D players in any country that didn't have FLGSs. That's obviously not the case.

FLGSs probably are important, though, at least in the US. But if WotC are going to support (almost exclusively American) FLGSs at the expense of their international customers (and American customers who don't have a FLGS that's actually both F and L) then I suspect they're going to do themselves more harm than good in the long-run.

In any case, artificially restricting the release of a new product doesn't look like the behaviour of a company that's confident about its product. Something is wrong, and I just don't believe the official explanation.
"There's an old saying that all it takes for evil to triumph is that good people do nothing. I've always had a problem with that. If you do nothing to oppose evil, then how are you 'good'? To turn aside and allow evil to flourish is to collaborate with it. You ask for mercy. You claim you have done nothing. That 'nothing' is why you deserve no mercy." - Lorian Karthfaerr, drow paladin of Avandra Robin Laws says I'm a Storyteller:
Show
You're more inclined toward the role playing side of the equation and less interested in numbers or experience points. You're quick to compromise if you can help move the story forward, and get bored when the game slows down for a long planning session. You want to play out a story that moves like it's orchestrated by a skilled novelist or film director. Storyteller 92% Tactician 83% Method Actor 75% Butt-Kicker 67% Power Gamer 67% Specialist 58% Casual Gamer 8%
what happened with the comic book industry ?

There was a recent article about it in one of my magazines (I thought it was Popular Science, but I'm having trouble finding it). Basically, the comic book industry wants to go online, but cannot because it would cause some stores to go out of business, decreasing the customer base just enough to cause a domino effect which would collapse the industry. Being a niche industry with small profit margins, the whole thing is evidently a house of cards (sorry to switch metaphors). And this is just comic books... a product without much of a social aspect.

If that were true, there'd be no D&D players in any country that didn't have FLGSs. That's obviously not the case.

House. Of. Cards.
... with dominoes.

if WotC are going to support (almost exclusively American) FLGSs at the expense of their international customers (and American customers who don't have a FLGS that's actually both F and L) then I suspect they're going to do themselves more harm than good in the long-run.

I'm sure there will still be plenty of on-line stores selling the book. This same thing was done for the exclusive Orcus figurine. Did you have trouble obtaining that overseas?
the fact that it is not available via "giant outlets" means I likely won't buy it.

Are WotC trying to drive customers away? This makes absolutely no sense to me. Can anyone explain this decision?

It's likely that FLGS's are essential to obtaining/retaining RPG customers (similar to what the comic book industry discovered... and RPG's are much more social than comic books). Put the FLGS's out of business, and the RPG industry could theoretically crash. Invest in them, and it's possible that the customer base grows. I'm interested to see how the strategy plays out.



I agree with the theory and with the ideal of supporting FLGS's but I fail to see how removing potential online sales from the equation can help the D&D brand.

As I've mentioned, my case is particular to me in that supplies of D&D products grew sporadic at my FLGS and alongside this, my work location changed, making the store much less convenient to pop into on the off chance that new stock had arrived. I have, however, continued to buy almost every D&D product since then through online retailers. If I can't get a product through these sources then I am not going to make speculative trips to my FLGS (which is no longer really L) and instead will not purchase the product. This means that WotC loses a sale and from what I have seen on this thread and in comments attached to the Rule of Three article, I am not alone in this.

I am still hopeful that a UK online retailer will carry the book but Amazon is usually my first stop and they are only showing the old, pre-cancellation listing which says the book is unavailable. This, therefore, makes no sense to me as a business decision. You cannot encourage people to buy a book by making it available in fewer places, particularly if you are an international brand, which D&D clearly is. 
I fail to see how removing potential online sales from the equation can help the D&D brand.

It likely a step done solely to keep local stores in business. Again though: the comic book industry realized that they're brand actually would suffer without the local stores.
This means that WotC loses a sale

Yup... and they're ok with this if it keeps the local stores in business. Indeed WotC is already losing out on huge amounts of sales by refusing to sell all those cool modules they're producing (that are selling for $50+ on ebay)... but they are giving them out free to the local stores simply to ensure customers come in.
House. Of. Cards.
... with dominoes.


'Domino theories' don't have a good track record, for what it's worth.

D&D seems to survive quite well in countries with no gaming stores to speak of. Games Workshop (my former employers, incidentally) had pretty much killed off independent gaming stores here well over a decade ago, but plenty of people here still play D&D and other RPGs.

I'm sure there will still be plenty of on-line stores selling the book. This same thing was done for the exclusive Orcus figurine. Did you have trouble obtaining that overseas?


I've never seen the Orcus fig over here. But that doesn't mean much, honestly, since I've never had any interest in WotC-produced miniatures.
"There's an old saying that all it takes for evil to triumph is that good people do nothing. I've always had a problem with that. If you do nothing to oppose evil, then how are you 'good'? To turn aside and allow evil to flourish is to collaborate with it. You ask for mercy. You claim you have done nothing. That 'nothing' is why you deserve no mercy." - Lorian Karthfaerr, drow paladin of Avandra Robin Laws says I'm a Storyteller:
Show
You're more inclined toward the role playing side of the equation and less interested in numbers or experience points. You're quick to compromise if you can help move the story forward, and get bored when the game slows down for a long planning session. You want to play out a story that moves like it's orchestrated by a skilled novelist or film director. Storyteller 92% Tactician 83% Method Actor 75% Butt-Kicker 67% Power Gamer 67% Specialist 58% Casual Gamer 8%
Games Workshop (my former employers, incidentally)


Man, I am so sorry for you.  I'm glad you made it out of there.  Some of their practices are downright illegal.  My favorite was requiring store employees to paint display models for the store on their own time, or they'd be fired.  And their training process?  Far too 'cult initiation' for my taste.

Great models.  Their prices and game rules can be a bit naff, but you can't fault them on model quality, or customer service for that matter.

But I would never want to work for them.
Necromancy: Friendship is Magic
maybe they figure few players really want to buy this product (i know i would rather throw my money into a river), so those few that do will go to a game store
Are WotC trying to drive customers away? This makes absolutely no sense to me. Can anyone explain this decision?



Simple: based on their previous products, they have an idea of how many copies this book will sell, and it isn't enough to justify printing the same number of books as they've been producing, and so with a more limited release, they've got to keep those product where they'll sell the best.



I talked to my close friend who works in the publishing industry- she has specifically dealt with Amazon. The reasons why Wizards is doing this can be one of many- none I endorse or dispute.

-they run the risk of pissing off Amazon by not selling through them (I've seen this happen). This could be an experiment that Wizards is doing to see how far they can push the major distributors (or keep from being pushed themselves by them). Never, ever underestimate the swag of major distributors.

-they might not want to pay for storage space for the book. Storage space is a big factor in costs when it comes to printed books.

-perhaps Wizards didn't like the price that Amazon, and other distributors, demanded for the book. So they opted to sell it on their terms to the FLGS.

My opinion- this is a freaking win-win for the little guys! FLGS have a hard time competing with Amazon and what not. This gives them a chance to sell a book in more volume than ever before. This, in itself, is awesome.

Amazon, and Wal-Mart, are cancers for the small businesses. Shame on those for supporting them!
 Amazon, and Wal-Mart, are cancers for the small businesses. Shame on those for supporting them!



As you've quoted me in this and then called shame on those who support Amazon, I feel obliged to respond.

As I think I've made perfectly clear, I am in no way anti-FLGS, anti small business, or, god forbid, supporting something that you have bizarrely labelled as a cancer!

Firstly, let's get some perspective, we are talking about consumer choice in a free market economy and not a horrific, often fatal disease so let's not escalate this into emmotive language unnecessarily. Having watched several people I know die of cancer including both my parents, this is not, in any way, the same thing.

Secondly, as I think I've made clear, my choice was made several years ago partly due to a move of office and partly due a lack of D&D stock. I have spent literally thousands of pounds in the FLGS I refer to but it is no longer worthwhile.

A speculative journey to the FLGS would require a one hour round trip from my office during my lunch break (discounting any time spent in the store) and roughly an hour and a half each way from home. In addition, as the store is in the centre of a city, it would require me to shell out around about 30% the cost of an average D&D book in parking costs and it could still be a wasted trip. If an FLGS was available in a place that was more convenient to me, I would gladly support it despite the higher prices that I would invariably pay.

At present, I order from Amazon (although support is a little strong) provided they stock what I am requiring and can deliver it promptly. I also support other UK online retailers including Gameslore (who are very good) and IGUK (also good). My goal here is not to pay the cheapest price I can, it is to purchase what I wish to with minimal hassle. While it may sound harsh to say this, small businesses are not charities nor, I suspect, do most of them want to be treated as such. I would support them over online retailers if it were not likely that the cost to my time and the additional related costs to make the purchase (parking, petrol etc.) were not disproportionnate. At present they are so I will continue my current purchasing habits and and will not buy this book unless it is available in the online retailers I currently use.
 Amazon, and Wal-Mart, are cancers for the small businesses. Shame on those for supporting them!



As you've quoted me in this and then called shame on those who support Amazon, I feel obliged to respond.

As I think I've made perfectly clear, I am in no way anti-FLGS, anti small business, or, god forbid, supporting something that you have bizarrely labelled as a cancer!

Firstly, let's get some perspective, we are talking about consumer choice in a free market economy and not a horrific, often fatal disease so let's not escalate this into emmotive language unnecessarily. Having watched several people I know die of cancer including both my parents, this is not, in any way, the same thing.

Secondly, as I think I've made clear, my choice was made several years ago partly due to a move of office and partly due a lack of D&D stock. I have spent literally thousands of pounds in the FLGS I refer to but it is no longer worthwhile.

A speculative journey to the FLGS would require a one hour round trip from my office during my lunch break (discounting any time spent in the store) and roughly an hour and a half each way from home. In addition, as the store is in the centre of a city, it would require me to shell out around about 30% the cost of an average D&D book in parking costs and it could still be a wasted trip. If an FLGS was available in a place that was more convenient to me, I would gladly support it despite the higher prices that I would invariably pay.

At present, I order from Amazon (although support is a little strong) provided they stock what I am requiring and can deliver it promptly. I also support other UK online retailers including Gameslore (who are very good) and IGUK (also good). My goal here is not to pay the cheapest price I can, it is to purchase what I wish to with minimal hassle. While it may sound harsh to say this, small businesses are not charities nor, I suspect, do most of them want to be treated as such. I would support them over online retailers if it were not likely that the cost to my time and the additional related costs to make the purchase (parking, petrol etc.) were not disproportionnate. At present they are so I will continue my current purchasing habits and and will not buy this book unless it is available in the online retailers I currently use.



Free market, eh? How about free speech. Amazon and Wal-Mart are cancers on FLGS. I grew up in the wastelands of Western USA, back in the 80's I had to drive 2.5 hours to the nearest city with a hobby store (well, my parents did). After college the nearest store was even further, 3-4 hours away. I still did it. So, no sympathy for not having a FLGS "conveniently located near you".
 Well, that is your fault you view the term cancer as offensive. I think it is a very appropriate term for how they are taking over all the other stores and turning them into Wal-marts and what not. Sorta like how a cancer cell turns another cells into a cancer cell. So I will damn well use the word cancer whenever I want.





Good for you for driving all that way to your FLGS. I did the same (well my parents did as yours did) in the 80s since there was no online ordering and no alternative. I was also a child and had no particular responsibilities so I relied on my parents to take me there when it was convenient to them (as you may also have done).  Now, the market is different as are my circumstances. I work 50-60 hours a week and have a six week old daughter and I cannot justify spending the money and time involved on speculative trips to the game store I used to use. That is my right as a consumer and it does not give you any right to call shame on me any more than I can call shame on you for your purchasing decisions.

Buy what you like where you like.
 Well, that is your fault you view the term cancer as offensive. I think it is a very appropriate term for how they are taking over all the other stores and turning them into Wal-marts and what not. Sorta like how a cancer cell turns another cells into a cancer cell. So I will damn well use the word cancer whenever I want.



I don't view the term cancer as offensive, I view it as inappropriate and emotive in the circumstances you describe. I also consider it offensive that you have labelled me as someone who supports such a thing. I do not. As I have already said, I have a great deal of experience of what cancer actually is and this is not it.

Good for you for driving all that way to your FLGS. I did the same (well my parents did as yours did) in the 80s since there was no online ordering and no alternative. I was also a child and had no particular responsibilities so I relied on my parents to take me there when it was convenient to them (as you may also have done).  Now, the market is different, I work 50-60 hours a week and have a six week old daughter and I cannot justify spending the money and time involved on speculative trips to the game store I used to use. That is my right as a consumer and it does not give you any right to call shame on me any more than I can call shame on you for your purchasing decisions.

Buy what you like where you like just don't label me for my decisions or claim I support something which I do not.



Alright, alright. I'll back off. Sorry for offending you about the term cancer.
 Alright, alright. I'll back off. Sorry for offending you about the term cancer.



Thanks. Appreciate the apology.

Not arguing with the general philosophy and would support my FLGS if I could but I literally do not have the time. I also applaud WotC to a certain extent for the decision if that is the idea behind it but just wanted to flag up in this thread that I would not be buying the book that way. 
 Alright, alright. I'll back off. Sorry for offending you about the term cancer.



Thanks. Appreciate the apology.

Not arguing with the general philosophy and would support my FLGS if I could but I literally do not have the time. I also applaud WotC to a certain extent for the decision if that is the idea behind it but just wanted to flag up in this thread that I would not be buying the book that way. 



Yeah, I was being an ass-hat. I can see where you are coming from with not being able to order online. It's an odd move by wizards.
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I suppose we should just be thankful that it's an actual book and not a card set.

Want to see the best of 4e included in 5e?  Join the Old Guard of 4e.

5e really needs something like Wrecan's SARN-FU to support "Theatre of the Mind."

"You want The Tooth?  You can't handle The Tooth!"  - Dahlver-Nar.

"If magic is unrestrained in the campaign, D&D quickly degenerates into a weird wizard show where players get bored quickly"  - E. Gary Gygax

 

 

Oops, looks like this request tried to create an infinite loop. We do not allow such things here. We are a professional website!

You do realize that by the time you came along they had already settled their disagreement like adults?


Not to mention, Medriev's post got edited, but the original text is all still there in the quote box in Hunterian7's next post.

(Am I the only one who sees absolutely nothing objectionable in what was apparently deleted? )
"There's an old saying that all it takes for evil to triumph is that good people do nothing. I've always had a problem with that. If you do nothing to oppose evil, then how are you 'good'? To turn aside and allow evil to flourish is to collaborate with it. You ask for mercy. You claim you have done nothing. That 'nothing' is why you deserve no mercy." - Lorian Karthfaerr, drow paladin of Avandra Robin Laws says I'm a Storyteller:
Show
You're more inclined toward the role playing side of the equation and less interested in numbers or experience points. You're quick to compromise if you can help move the story forward, and get bored when the game slows down for a long planning session. You want to play out a story that moves like it's orchestrated by a skilled novelist or film director. Storyteller 92% Tactician 83% Method Actor 75% Butt-Kicker 67% Power Gamer 67% Specialist 58% Casual Gamer 8%
Anyway, back at the topic, I'm not going to rage about MME too much until I know for certain whether I'll be able to get it online from somewhere like IGUK or Orc's Nest. If it's really just the truly big guys like Amazon that won't be able to sell it, I'm not too bothered.
"There's an old saying that all it takes for evil to triumph is that good people do nothing. I've always had a problem with that. If you do nothing to oppose evil, then how are you 'good'? To turn aside and allow evil to flourish is to collaborate with it. You ask for mercy. You claim you have done nothing. That 'nothing' is why you deserve no mercy." - Lorian Karthfaerr, drow paladin of Avandra Robin Laws says I'm a Storyteller:
Show
You're more inclined toward the role playing side of the equation and less interested in numbers or experience points. You're quick to compromise if you can help move the story forward, and get bored when the game slows down for a long planning session. You want to play out a story that moves like it's orchestrated by a skilled novelist or film director. Storyteller 92% Tactician 83% Method Actor 75% Butt-Kicker 67% Power Gamer 67% Specialist 58% Casual Gamer 8%
Wizards of the Coast, you may not realize this, but all the Borders Book shops are closing in the Cleveland area. This will only leave you a select few shops where you could sell your products. If you don't sell your products through Amazon, then there won't be anyone who'll sell your products anymore.


Just some food for thought..... 
Are they hurting so bad for cash that they need to sell at FLGS only? Are sales that poor? I'm worried about D&D. Those who don't act quick will probably be shopping at eBay with inflated prices.
Having complained, I should add that if this is an exception rather than a new way forward, then I'm cool with it. Gencon should reveal much about the direction things a really headed. I'd really like to have my optimism back. I can't wait to see what is announced.
as someone who works in a FLGS and for another big box retailer. The FLGS' can not compete with Amazon selling their books at the price they do. Also with in store game events like Encounters and Lair Assault this is a way for WotC to throw a bone to the FLGS.

In my opinion and my bosses opinion as well, the Core Books should be available at Amazon the rest should be in a FLGS only. Until they can come up with some incentive for buying in store only I think this is a great idea only making this book available to customers.
In my opinion and my bosses opinion as well, the Core Books should be available at Amazon the rest should be in a FLGS only.


So, virtually nobody outside the USA should be able to play D&D with anything other than the basic core books? Screw that. Sideways.
"There's an old saying that all it takes for evil to triumph is that good people do nothing. I've always had a problem with that. If you do nothing to oppose evil, then how are you 'good'? To turn aside and allow evil to flourish is to collaborate with it. You ask for mercy. You claim you have done nothing. That 'nothing' is why you deserve no mercy." - Lorian Karthfaerr, drow paladin of Avandra Robin Laws says I'm a Storyteller:
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You're more inclined toward the role playing side of the equation and less interested in numbers or experience points. You're quick to compromise if you can help move the story forward, and get bored when the game slows down for a long planning session. You want to play out a story that moves like it's orchestrated by a skilled novelist or film director. Storyteller 92% Tactician 83% Method Actor 75% Butt-Kicker 67% Power Gamer 67% Specialist 58% Casual Gamer 8%
yeah that has to be one of the worst ideas ive ever heard
people love to get nuts over everything, even if its imagined

just wait for the book and grade it based on its contents. i swear its like some of you guys WANT D&D to fail
people love to get nuts over everything, even if its imagined

just wait for the book and grade it based on its contents. i swear its like some of you guys WANT D&D to fail


A good portion of the "fans" here actually do want the current iteration of D&D to fail.


I am looking forward to this book.  
CORE MORE, NOT CORE BORE!