Dead DM

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I have not played in almost 6 months. I left my last group in anger after many sessions were ditched by 2-3 players at a time who decided to do other things, leaving me and those who had decided to come (that day) to show up alone.

The players who got me into D&D have all retired.

I have not been able to find anyone else anywhere near competent enough to play, or interested enough to learn.

Online games don't hold weight.

Do I give in? Do I relinquish the title of DM, and put my books on the shelves, and forget about D&D?
Oy, I live in a country where I will never find DnDers (stupid cultural ignorance about the subject), but I'll never forget about DnD. Screw those punks, get searching and find yourself a real group!

If you can't find one now, then shelve those books for now with plans to pull them up for a future group, but don't give up DnD, it's not a game, it's an extension of your mind Cool
Oy, I live in a country where I will never find DnDers (stupid cultural ignorance about the subject), but I'll never forget about DnD. Screw those punks, get searching and find yourself a real group!

If you can't find one now, then shelve those books for now with plans to pull them up for a future group, but don't give up DnD, it's not a game, it's an extension of your mind

Ok, things didn't go well...but of course there are more players out there. Put some adverts on the forum for new players and find some new guys. It's unfortunate and can knock your confidence but it's not worth stopping all gaming because of this one unfortunate turn of events.
Do I give in? Do I relinquish the title of DM, and put my books on the shelves, and forget about D&D?

Nope.

You put an ad on Craigslist, Meetup, or whatever your local equivalent might be and start over with a fresh new set of players. Those who respond to a want ad tend to be a bit more invested in the dedication than those you directly invite form your own network. After all, they respond to the ad usually because they are looking for it.

Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
What Seeker said.  It should be even easier since I get from your post that you are wiling to DM, possibly even that you prefer it.  I have found that a DM looking for players usually has a FAR easier time than a player looking for a DM.
You can play onlinet, too!  Either here on the WOTC boards (search for the group "Real Adventures", to name one) or on other boards such as www.rpol.net

Cheers  
Do I give in? Do I relinquish the title of DM, and put my books on the shelves, and forget about D&D?

Nope.

You put an ad on Craigslist, Meetup, or whatever your local equivalent might be and start over with a fresh new set of players. Those who respond to a want ad tend to be a bit more invested in the dedication than those you directly invite form your own network. After all, they respond to the ad usually because they are looking for it.





From experience, these groups are often iffy. I played in a group set up this way. We had a girl in her 20's, two teenage guys, and a 40 year old GM who hadn't been outside in years. It was a marvelous disaster.
From experience, these groups are often iffy. I played in a group set up this way. We had a girl in her 20's, two teenage guys, and a 40 year old GM who hadn't been outside in years. It was a marvelous disaster.

The difference was that you were a player looking for a group. When the DM is looking for players, it is very much a DM-driven endeavor. Each time I have done this (three times), I have had two to three times the number of players than I needed respond, so I got to "interview" players to select a group.
Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
The difference was that you were a player looking for a group. When the DM is looking for players, it is very much a DM-driven endeavor. Each time I have done this (three times), I have had two to three times the number of players than I needed respond, so I got to "interview" players to select a group.



You never felt bad for telling "no" to players?

Rommel, I feel your pain.

Be very specific in what you'd like in players for your game when you post.  Age, experience, system, setting, etc.  Have everyone, including yourself on a "try-out" basis until you wittle down to a group you can work with.  No group is perfect, but you can mold it to something reasonable for all.

And make a very clear rule about giving adequate (you define) notice if you can't make a game.  Irritating when people are so rude.


Never give up!  Never surrender!

...or something like that. 
Another idea is to go to your local comic/gaming store, and talk to the people running the store. If you've got a store in your area that supports RPG gaming, they might know of some people looking for a group, OR, show up for one of the Wednesday night D&D Encounters events. You'll get to meet some people interested in D&D, and possibly you could get some of them to come to a regular gaming group.
The difference was that you were a player looking for a group. When the DM is looking for players, it is very much a DM-driven endeavor. Each time I have done this (three times), I have had two to three times the number of players than I needed respond, so I got to "interview" players to select a group.

You never felt bad for telling "no" to players?

I can't speak for Seeker, but the one time I've put together a group, I didn't feel bad about not having everyone who messaged me play. It helped that I only needed to fill one slot, and I made passing on the news easier by saying that I'd keep them in mind if any new spots opened up.



You never felt bad for telling "no" to players?




It's as much a favor for them as it is for you.  As a general rule, people who would ruin a group will end up not enjoying themselves anyway.
The difference between madness and genius is determined only by degrees of success.
You never felt bad for telling "no" to players?

Nope. No more than I've felt bad saying no to job applicants.

When I put all that work into a new campaign, I want players that will have fun with it and that will enable me to have fun. But the interview is a two way street. Some of the players tell me no as well. I don't allow PvP. I don't allow psionics (monk is not really psionic). I don't allow evil PCs. Some players are not okay with these restrictions. They moved on. I respect that.

Because I conduct all of the interviews in a single week, and get back to everyone on the same day, I never have to tell anyone that I did not think it would be a match. I am able to say the game is full. And sometimes I really do have to pick between players that I would be perfectly happy having, but don't have room for. I ask them if they would like a call-back if a player has to drop out, and then keep those that do on a reserve list. I've had to use it in all three games, because life gets in the way of D&D sometimes.
Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
Another idea is to go to your local comic/gaming store, and talk to the people running the store. If you've got a store in your area that supports RPG gaming, they might know of some people looking for a group, OR, show up for one of the Wednesday night D&D Encounters events. You'll get to meet some people interested in D&D, and possibly you could get some of them to come to a regular gaming group.



Gotta give even more props to this post.

I DM Encounters every Wednesday and if you can find a store with an active program, show up and play.  Then offer your services as an experienced DM (most DMs doing encounters would love to have someone like you show up and help).  Then run some games at the store.  What this does, is it allows you to get to know a group of players, and, once you do you can "cherry pick" inviting the ones that are compatible to the game you want to run on another night.

Just make sure you support the store in the process - very important!

Rommel,

You don't have to feel bad about turning players down - just tell them that you're looking for players who are in the same age range and level of experience.  It's not really a lie, and the players won't feel insulted.

Cheers