Cost Effective minis?

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So i have been barrowing a set of minatures from a friend for months now but i really need to give them back, does anyone know the most cost effective wa yo get minis? i just need some generic monsters (any kind they just need to have a few variances to show they are not the same monster) and a small schlew of PC minis.


Any ideas? 
In order to become an official DM, you have to find one, challenge him to combat, kill him and take his books... -Mad_Jack GLimle:o7 Ffarqhuar:miss. b3
So i have been barrowing a set of minatures from a friend for months now but i really need to give them back, does anyone know the most cost effective wa yo get minis? i just need some generic monsters (any kind they just need to have a few variances to show they are not the same monster) and a small schlew of PC minis.


Any ideas? 

Legos. Army men. Playskool. Scrabble tiles. Chesspieces. Coins. Spools of thread. Playdo.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

I found a cheap set of peweter minis on ebay and bought them, it will do for now, but thank you, i intend to buy a bunh of random army men for minons.
In order to become an official DM, you have to find one, challenge him to combat, kill him and take his books... -Mad_Jack GLimle:o7 Ffarqhuar:miss. b3
Any ideas? 

Tokens.
Specifically: Monster Vault

Although I'm an avid miniature enthusiast, 4e is currently pushing tokens as the standard. fwiw: the times I've tokens, I was actually pretty happy. Using an appropriate token for the monsters is actually better (i.e. clearer and easier) than using an dissimilar miniature.

My recommendation is to use tokens for monsters and actual miniatures for PC's (which your players can probably supply). That way you always have miniatures on the table for almost no cost. Players don't seem to care if their enemies are tokens so long as their own character is a miniature, and it makes battles a bit clearer too.
Damn good idea, i run a pizza hut, i'll go super cheap and cutupsome cardboard and cut out pictures for toekens 
In order to become an official DM, you have to find one, challenge him to combat, kill him and take his books... -Mad_Jack GLimle:o7 Ffarqhuar:miss. b3
Damn good idea, i run a pizza hut, i'll go super cheap and cutupsome cardboard and cut out pictures for toekens 

Not sure what your time is worth, but Monster Vault can be had for $18 (say, with a Borders coupon), and it has hundreds of these already (well) made... pretty much every monster you'll ever use.

... plus you get a book of updated monster stats, some maps, and an adventure.

This isn't "cheap" by any means but www.reapermini.com  has a whole Pathfinder line which is of course very D&D compatible. Yes, you have to paint them, but it's actually a lot of fun. Got into Warhammer minis a few years ago wasn't that interested in the painting but turned out to be a blast. Do more painting than playing.

You can also find common/uncommon lots of D&D minis on ebay, of course.

And a big +1 to Monster Vault. Looking forward to the new one as well.  
Go to rptools.net. Download Tokentool. Create tokens of choice. Print tokens as needed. Enjoy!
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Thanks, the token maker will keep me from enslaving my wife to make them for me.
In order to become an official DM, you have to find one, challenge him to combat, kill him and take his books... -Mad_Jack GLimle:o7 Ffarqhuar:miss. b3
This isn't "cheap" by any means but www.reapermini.com  has a whole Pathfinder line which is of course very D&D compatible. Yes, you have to paint them, but it's actually a lot of fun. Got into Warhammer minis a few years ago wasn't that interested in the painting but turned out to be a blast. Do more painting than playing.
 



Ya I gotta agree, Reaper Minis are the best quality minis and you can paint in your times between game sessions.
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 Reaper also makes prepainted plastics... Rather than painting a dozen orcs/goblins/skeletons, you can buy three of them for almost the same price as one metal one. And most of them are available with several different weapons (you can get skeletons with bows, spears or swords, for example).



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I shop at Miniature Market.  miniaturemarket.com/d_d_minis

They have a few varieties for 10 cents, and some for a quarter.  Shipping is usually around 3 bucks, so I make sure I order about 10 bucks worth or so at a time. 

You can re-use the same minis over and over for monsters, I just try to get the size category right.
does anyone know the most cost effective wa yo get minis?  





I just bought 58 minis from Coolstuffinc.com.

It cost $254.

So, no. Not really.

Try starting with the Castle Ravenloft and Wrath of Ashardalon games. Each one has 42 minis and can be found for about $45 on some websites.
In addition, two sites I regularly buy minis from allow you to shop based on price. They are auggiesgamesonline.com and popularcollections.com.

I consider any figure less than $1.50 to be cheap, and both sites have a great selection of them.

Coins, poker chips, metal washers, tokens and playing pieces from board games, 1" - 1/5" lengths of wood dowel in various diameters, make your own from Sculpey modeling clay, I've made plenty of snakes out of various sized finishing nails (hammer the head flat, then file into a more snake-head shape and paint bright, dangerous colors), all sorts of critters can be found as packages of plastic minis from dollar stores from bugs to farm animals to dinosaurs, caps from bottles of water or sports drinks, dead batteries especially C or D cells, beads, rocks/pebbles.

Once you REALLY start looking you can find cheap "minis" everywhere.  

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Go to rptools.net. Download Tokentool. Create tokens of choice. Print tokens as needed. Enjoy!

Thanks! I've been using GIMP, but this is much faster!
Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
If you have a colour printer and don't mind paying a little bit, then products like these are good value:


fierydragon.com/dragonsbreath/?cat=12


I also bought a ton of D&D miniatures on eBay for a song, I wouldn't be surprised if you can find good deals online for them still.
I think that you'll discover that once you get started, your horde will grow quickly. I DM mostly, so I am always on the look out for new monsters, especially the "filler" ones (gobs, orcs, zombies, skele's, etc.). To create my armies, I keep a sharp eye out for sales around my local gaming haunts, as well as online markets already mentioned (eBay, C-list, etc.). It seems like these places are trying to dump their supply, so I've had the best luck getting a good deal OUTSIDE of the places like Mini Market, previously mentioned.

If you buy new, I recommend buying the goblins, orcs, et al, prepainted plastics from Reapers. The paint job is decent and buying 3-4 in a blister pack is cheaper than purchasing the single metal mini's in almost every case. You might come out even in some cases by purchasing a pack of 3-4 metal monsters, but you'll still have to paint them. And I wouldn't wish finding out the hard way how tedious it can get painting 20 kobolds on my worst enemy!

As far as PCs go, though, I like obsessing until I get the one that is exactly what I want, pay the price, and take 10 hours to paint it. Then hope s/he doesn't die! Or at least has a "brother" you can play later :-)

As a side note, I was previously anti minis, but I've really seen how they can bring a game to life.
I make my own out of paper.



Printed on photopaper and glued back to back, so image on back is a reverse of the front. While I usuall do my own art, there is a lot of art online you can grab that would work just fine.

Here's a rough idea of how put them together: paper minis

I use an exacto knife (sharp blade), metal ruler, and Elmer's gel glue stick (keeps paper from warping). To make folds, I will 'score' the paper by gently running the exacto knife over the fold lines, being careful not to cut all the way through. Makes a real clean exact fold, which is necessary if you want the front and back to line up. The better they line up, the more precise you can get with the trimming. 
I can see the potential of minis. They are the same as 3d terrain. They create immersion.
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I can see the potential of minis. They are the same as 3d terrain. They create immersion.



And tokens are hard to pick up and move. One advantage to tokens, though, is that you can have one side as "normal" and the other side "bloodied".
One advantage to tokens, though, is that you can have one side as "normal" and the other side "bloodied".

I use the Alea tools condition markers (magnets). Rather than spend a fortune on magnets (the magnet sheets are $10 for four 8-1/2 x 11 sheets that don't often work, and Alea charges a bit too much for their blanks) for each of my minis, I rubber cement steel washers to the bottom of each mini I own.

However, I really appreciate tokens for their storage advantages. Last week, I started doing this with the tokens as well. Makes them a lot easier to pick up as it doubles the thickness of each mini *before* using any condition marker magnets. The tokens are just as easy to pick up as checkers. Throw in a single condition, and it becomes as easy as a mini. Possibly even easier in a crowd.

Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
I can see the potential of minis. They are the same as 3d terrain. They create immersion.

Only sort of. They can also lock you in to an overly restrictive way of thinking about scene.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

I play Warhammer, and picked up this idea from a friend - you can buy lots of Goblins, Orcs, Kobolds, Skeletons, Elves and Humans from Games Workshop in boxes of 15-20. You can make as many as you ever expect to field at one time, and then keep them sorted in the plastic seed planters from any gardening section of Home Depot, Walmart, Target, etc. so it's easy to peruse them as well. Some assembly is required, and unless you like painting you may be fielding a lot of gray minis, but if you're also into Warhammer you will most likely have at least some of them already.

Otherwise I have to concur with the suggestion of tokens. Monster Vault, DM's Kit, Monsters of the Nentir Vale all come with wonderful tokens on good cardstock - and if you make the players responsible for their own minis (or they'll be stuck with a token) they can track down their own Reaper or whatever their preference may be.
I use the Alea tools condition markers (magnets). Rather than spend a fortune on magnets (the magnet sheets are $10 for four 8-1/2 x 11 sheets that don't often work, and Alea charges a bit too much for their blanks) for each of my minis, I rubber cement steel washers to the bottom of each mini I own.

Seeker, you can get magnet disks that have double sided tape on one side of the magnet.  These are sold VERY cheap at craft stores or Wal Mart.  I think it's like 36 disks or so for 2 bucks.  I highly recommend this if you use a magnetic dry erase board.

I also use card stock to print my custom tokens in conjunction with the magnet disks.  Card stock is relatively cheap these days, but you typically need a printer that has rear feed.

You can also get 1", 2", 3" hole punches at a craft store in the scrapbooking section.  They run about 10 bucks each, but they are well worth it since you can create perfect circles at that point.

Celebrate our differences.

One advantage to tokens, though, is that you can have one side as "normal" and the other side "bloodied".

I use the Alea tools condition markers (magnets). Rather than spend a fortune on magnets (the magnet sheets are $10 for four 8-1/2 x 11 sheets that don't often work, and Alea charges a bit too much for their blanks) for each of my minis, I rubber cement steel washers to the bottom of each mini I own.

However, I really appreciate tokens for their storage advantages. Last week, I started doing this with the tokens as well. Makes them a lot easier to pick up as it doubles the thickness of each mini *before* using any condition marker magnets. The tokens are just as easy to pick up as checkers. Throw in a single condition, and it becomes as easy as a mini. Possibly even easier in a crowd.



Why bother with rubber cement and washers?  Blu-tac and pennies work just as well.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
Besides some of the things already mentioned, I've been using minis from the Quest for the Dragonlords board game. It contains over a hundred minis of humans, elves orcs etc. in different colors, as well as some black dragon minis, some boat minis, a few dozen plastic tokens, a set of polyhedral dice (black with red letters) and a fabric bag to hold them. The whole thing in action looks like this.

The game itself is so-so. That means you'll probably not play it much and won't use the board and cards. However, it also means you can get it second-hand for about $30-$40 if you look around a bit, or even cheaper if you're lucky enough to find one that's missing some random pieces you don't need anyway.

I've built up a collection of GWs Lord of the Rings minis, especially the plastics.  They regularly turn up on ebay and provide good orcs, goblins, hobgoblins (Uruk hai) as well as humans for town guards, militia etc. 
they were available in the UK free with a magazine part work, so lots of people started to collect, and now seem to be selling them off.

Why bother with rubber cement and washers?  Blu-tac and pennies work just as well.

Pennies won't let the token stick to the Alea tool magnetic condition marker. And pennies are not in various sizes. Washers come in all the sizes I need.

Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
Pennies (in the UK at least) produced after 1992 (yes, I looked it up on wiki) are made of copper-plated steel, and are appropriately magnetic.  I suggested it because that's how we make out alea magnets stick to our minis much of the time...  2p coins fit nicely on Large minis, too, but we tend not to stack up the condition markers under those, they get a bit precarious.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
Pennies (in the UK at least) produced after 1992 (yes, I looked it up on wiki) are made of copper-plated steel, and are appropriately magnetic.

Ahh... well, I don't see a whole lot of UK pennies here in Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Must be that language barrier thing.

Good tip if I'm playing abroad, though!
Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
Pennies (in the UK at least) produced after 1992 (yes, I looked it up on wiki) are made of copper-plated steel, and are appropriately magnetic.  I suggested it because that's how we make out alea magnets stick to our minis much of the time

Well now, that's some interesting information.

2p coins fit nicely on Large minis, too

Aren't those almost the exact same size as medium sized bases? (2p=25.9mm=1.019")
At about 3¢ each US, those could be pretty handy.

1p coins fit inside medium bases of DDM figs, 2ps fit onto them more-or-less flush with the edges.  I think the former looks better.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
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