What crime did my character commit?

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Hi there, Im currently in the devising stage of my characters background- a rapier wielding rogue/party face who've I decided to go all out on the cliches with, turning him into a rakish, byronic antihero.
 This of course means half my backstory is already written- he's a disgraced ex noble languishing in exile after commiting some heinous crime.
 Unfortunately Im having trouble coming with something good enough for said crime, and so I was hoping that someone here had a good idea? Ill take anything but it would scan better if it had resulted less from actual malice and more from the characters reckless and impulsive nature getting the better of him (i.e. high CHA but low INT & WIS).

 Cheers for any help you can give.
Time for some thrilling heroics....
Perhaps instead of an 'actual' crime, he simply embarassed or humiliated another noble?  Said noble then took it upon himself to ruin and discredit you ... perhaps destroying the documents that proved you were of noble birth, and created a lie that you were just a pretender?
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
The classic crime for this scenario would be the accidental death of another disappated fop in a duel. A hideously illegal duel, of course, and over a woman of questionable virtues. ;)

edit: for more justice
So many PCs, so little time...
I reckon why settle for one heinous crime - go for two.

Suicicde followed by necromancy.  Change your race to revenant.
Perhaps the crime never actually happened (or your character did not actually commit it), but rumours of his guilt were spread by a jealous ex-lover?

"My flying carpet is full of elves."

And whether he did or didn't make a cuckold of Lord Pormqual--a gentleman never tells!--in order to avoid further damage to Lady Pormqual's reputation, he has taken the path of self-exile, rapier in hand...
Pormqual


Another Steven Erikson fan?

"My flying carpet is full of elves."

He dis some terrible social gaffe. Dependimg how restrictive society can be it could be anything from using the wrong spoonto a disparaging remark about the king or queen to questionable prolictivities (sex, larcentuous behaviour, pederastry).
That which does not kill me, makes me stranger.
Maybe he tried to counterfeit or debase the local currency -- but wasn't very good at it.

In real life, the ancient philosopher Diogenes was exiled from his home city for being involved in his father's counterfeiting scheme.
Pormqual


Another Steven Erikson fan?



Ain't I just?
1. He wanted to insult the town/city's head of the guard by sleeping with the guy's daughter only to find out he slept with his wife instead Tongue out

2. Entered in a duel (not to the death) with the king and won

3. Got drunk with friends and on a dare, sold bricks to protesters only to wake up from his drunken stupor the next morning to find he sold bricks to protests who were for some reason gathered outside his own house

4. Without even being drunk he pulled a '****' and pantsed the king

5. He wanted to have some innocent fun and dressed up as a doppelgangers true form and ran around the city which started a minor inquisition (though to keep it all innocent fun, it can be that no one got seriously injured or killed)

6. Wanted to help his friend to finally 'become a man' and hired some outside help to procure what's necessary, only to have unwittingly financed the import of an illegal goblin prostitution ring
7. He loudly and publicly dressed down someone unimportant for a minor social infraction, only to later learn this person was of considerably higher station than himself.

8. He took credit for a crime he didn't commit to save the reputation of the real perpetrator (a relative, perhaps).

9. He carried a package for a friend during is travels, only to learn he was delivering a forbidden substance. 

10. After a drunken night of "bang the pot on every front door", he later learned that you're not supposed to play the game with a chamber pot, much less a full one, nor should you include the local magistrate's front door, and certainly not if that's where you also pass out for the night. 

It wasn't his crime it was his father's.  His father was accused of high treason by other lords and he was imprisoned then executed, his mother was imprisoned for conspiracy and the rest of the House was banished and the holdings split between a few rivals.


Want to add a personal quest?  His father was framed.  He needs to prove it, get revenge on the rival lords, free his mother and restore his holdings.


Tjd


 

It wasn't his crime it was his father's.  His father was accused of high treason by other lords and he was imprisoned then executed, his mother was imprisoned for conspiracy and the rest of the House was banished and the holdings split between a few rivals.


Want to add a personal quest?  His father was framed.  He needs to prove it, get revenge on the rival lords, free his mother and restore his holdings.


Tjd


 


1) Helping a racial minority, or standing up for a low class woman who was being harassed by a prince.

2) Perhaps he insulted a noble who is actually a dragon in disguise. The dragon 'suggested' he leave town for awhile.

3) He participated in a minority religious festival.  This was seen as blasphemous by the church, and while the church isn't all powerful it was still suggested he leave.

4) He slept with three different noble's daughters (or sons) at the same time.

Is the rogue a fugitive, or has his disgrace satisfied the lord of the realm?  Is his crime something he's proud of, or a source of shame?  Could it be that he's taking credit for one crime that enhances his reputation to cover up a more serious crime?  Is he still on the run?  If so, then from what?

Maybe he was staring down the barrel of a long, boring life of responsibility, duty and property, and couldn't bear it.  He had a sober, responsible younger brother, so he went out and did the most scandalous thing he could think of so that he'd be disinherited.  His brother was to be married off to ally their house with a neighboring family, and while he was committed to the union and besotted with the woman, our rogue knew her to be a thoroughly wicked, scheming, faithless succubus (figuratively; not taxonomically).  So kill two birds with one stone, right?  

Our rogue seduced his brother's bride on the eve of the wedding, and the two of them were discovered in the chapel on the morning of the ceremony, in a tangle of bare limbs atop the altar before which she was to be married!  His brother is spared a lifetime of bondage to the beast, he earns a reputation as a world class scoundrel and his father is forced to disinherit him to salvage his relationship with her outraged family. 

His brother, ingorant of the fate he's been spared, will never forgive him.  Lands and titles are poor trade for his public humiliation and the love of his young life being brought to ruin by his own older brother.  The lady whose virtue our rogue used to buy his freedom also wants his head, but since the affair she can't marry into a house with broad enough reach to get her claws on him.  Even as a disgraced spinster she's not to be trifled with, so our hero would do well to sleep with one eye open.

"When Friday comes, we'll all call rats fish." D&D Outsider

Is the rogue a fugitive, or has his disgrace satisfied the lord of the realm?  Is his crime something he's proud of, or a source of shame?  Could it be that he's taking credit for one crime that enhances his reputation to cover up a more serious crime?  Is he still on the run?  If so, then from what?

Maybe he was staring down the barrel of a long, boring life of responsibility, duty and property, and couldn't bear it.  He had a sober, responsible younger brother, so he went out and did the most scandalous thing he could think of so that he'd be disinherited.  His brother was to be married off to ally their house with a neighboring family, and while he was committed to the union and besotted with the woman, our rogue knew her to be a thoroughly wicked, scheming, faithless succubus (figuratively; not taxonomically).  So kill two birds with one stone, right?  

Our rogue seduced his brother's bride on the eve of the wedding, and the two of them were discovered in the chapel on the morning of the ceremony, in a tangle of bare limbs atop the altar before which she was to be married!  His brother is spared a lifetime of bondage to the beast, he earns a reputation as a world class scoundrel and his father is forced to disinherit him to salvage his relationship with her outraged family. 

His brother, ingorant of the fate he's been spared, will never forgive him.  Lands and titles are poor trade for his public humiliation and the love of his young life being brought to ruin by his own older brother.  The lady whose virtue our rogue used to buy his freedom also wants his head, but since the affair she can't marry into a house with broad enough reach to get her claws on him.  Even as a disgraced spinster she's not to be trifled with, so our hero would do well to sleep with one eye open.


Kaganfindel, that is awesome.

Snip



  This reads like something from Game of Thrones and was exactly what I was looking for, thank you.

  There is however a question of why a scheming harpy like the bride would fall victim to the rogues seduction, she'd probably see it coming a mile off- how about if she was just trying to get him under her thumb? She's heard the tales about him and his misdemeanours; coming to the conclusion that frequent sex would be all that was needed to control him.
  Unfortunately she underestimated him- he plays upto his reputation as a scroundrel to make life easier- he'd left a message with his father, brother and members of the brides family to come to the chapel early.

  Loving this background, the details practically write themselves once you've got one this solid.
Time for some thrilling heroics....
There is however a question of why a scheming harpy like the bride would fall victim to the rogues seduction, she'd probably see it coming a mile off- how about if she was just trying to get him under her thumb? She's heard the tales about him and his misdemeanours; coming to the conclusion that frequent sex would be all that was needed to control him.



She'd also have some pretty serious blackmailing leverage over our rogue.  As she figures things, he's the one with everything to lose.  She's a social climber who lusts after power, and he's the heir to her husband's family holdings.  If she had information that could ruin his relationship with his brother and have him disinherited, she'd own him. 

It would never in a thousand years dawn on such a creature that anyone would want to be beggared.  His worst nightmare is her fondest dream.  If she puts up any resistance at all, it's going to be to avoid scaring him off.  She wants this.  She might even have been planning to make a play for him!

All our rogue really has to do is make sure she oversleeps.  A little something in the wine ought to do.

If you really, really want to darken the story up, have him get the dosage wrong. 
"When Friday comes, we'll all call rats fish." D&D Outsider
Even better: every time he tells the story use one of the scenarios above, but always change it up.
 

Colette: "Horst has done time."
Linguini: "What for?"
Colette: "No one know for sure. He changes the story every time you ask him."

Horst: "I defrauded a major corporation."
Horst: "I robbed the second-largest bank in France using only a ball-point pen."
Horst: "I created a hole in the ozone layer over Avignon."
Horst: "I killed a man... with this thumb."


"When Friday comes, we'll all call rats fish." D&D Outsider
 

Colette: "Horst has done time."
Linguini: "What for?"
Colette: "No one know for sure. He changes the story every time you ask him."

Horst: "I defrauded a major corporation."
Horst: "I robbed the second-largest bank in France using only a ball-point pen."
Horst: "I created a hole in the ozone layer over Avignon."
Horst: "I killed a man... with this thumb."





He was with the rebles
witch ones?
The ones that lost  
The sea looks at the stabillity of the mountian and sighs. The mountian watches the freedom of the sea and cries.
Or maybe this:

While a member of Robin Hood's band of merry men, Our Hero managed to rob the only honest noble within two week's ride.  This act torqued the noble off and he quit sending under-the-table assistance to the poor oppressed villagers of Nottingham.  Having visibly made his friends' plight worse, Our Hero decided to take public credit for many robberies (including the one he actually did) and left the area.

But the plot line with the disguised succubus is pretty good - and funny - too.

Best complements I have yet received

Making it up as I go along:

{BRJN} If I was writing the Tome of Lore, I would let Auppenser sleep. But I also would have him dream. In his dreaming he re-activates the innate powers of (some) mortal minds. Or his dreaming changes the nature of reality - currently very malleable thanks to Spellplague &c. Or whatever really cool flavor text and pseudo-science explanation people react positively to.

{Lord_Karsus} You know, I like that better than the explanations for the Spellplague.

 

{BRJN} If Bhaal approves of The Joker, does he approve of Jack Nicholson's portrayal or Heath Ledger's protrayal more?

{Stigger} That question is utterly classic, and completely on target.

 

Prepped ahead of time:

I started the 4e thread "1001 Failed Interrogation Results" (now lost in that great electronic goodnight, alas)

{ADHadh} These are all good and make sense! I just can't come up with something that's not covered here and is not completely ridiculous.

 

(News bulletin: Updated thread to be posted after I review the 5e DMG)

 

My 5e characters

Active:

none yet - gotta find a group !

Character Ready-to-go:

Erevyn Meliamne, Wood elf Monk1, inspired by "Radar O'Reilley" from M*A*S*H

Concepts I'm kicking around:

Barbarian w/Tough feat, to be nearly indestructible

"Truenamer" cleric - all spells are Verbal

"Buggy" Wizard - insect flavor on everything.  His DMPC / BBEG version is going to become a beetle version of a Worm That Walks.  (See the 4e Lamia.)  Because lichdom is so cliche.

Stole the pet tiger of someone major in his drunken stupidity.
Get your Microsoft Word Monster Statistics Block Template here! My Campaign
Kaganfindel's backstory creates some excellent opportunity for future intrigue and villainy. This Harpy character wants revenge and has all of the motivation necessary to become a major thorn in our rogue hero's life. She could be from a powerful family and have vast resources at her disposal. Scorned lovers make wonderful villains. This all works for the rogue's brother as well. You should discuss with your DM about whether or not he'd like to work it into the plot.
As to why they scheming woman would sleep with the rogue - he could be the older brother; the rogues family could have initially intended to marry the rogue to the woman but the womans family refused due to his flipant nature.

The schemer would see the rogues change of heart as adventagious.
The rogue would have a backstory on how he knows the woman is a power hungry schemer (if she was willing to marry the rogue and then his little brother)
And the rogue is a good person because he's doing a solid for his little brother (showing he's not abject to all responsability)
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