Player's Guide for Homebrew World: Under a False Sky (134 page PDF)

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I have written a book for my own homebrew campaign world, Under a False Sky.

Overview: This game world features a low-magic, low-wealth, generally human setting, taking place on a demiplane. Iron Heroes heavily influenced my development of this book. The guide focuses on episodic campaigns (rather than long adventures), with low-fantasy heroes struggling for existence against the slaadi and the mysterious Faceless, occasionally helped by the enigmatic Gith.

New Rules:
*Alternate encumbrance/armor penalties for a grittier campaign, where walking around like a metal tank has a price to pay.
*Low-wealth rules
*Hero Points: Meant to supplement a campaign with little or no magic items, this mechanic is like very powerful action points. They also function as a reward for excellent roleplay. A hero point allows a hero to accomplish an amazing success, a miraculous survival, or an incredible stunt
* Human character creation with a background and traits system, to make more variety for a human-only game.
* Feats, paragon paths, and epic destinies to support these new rules

New Classes:
* five new classes, fully-fleshed out for levels 1-30
* Skirmisher, a martial melee controller
* Alchemist, a ranged controller with a new power source (alchemical)
* Brute, a bare-fisted martial melee defender
* Psywarrior, a psiblade-wielding psionic melee/ranged striker
* Champion, an aura-using martial leader
* Each class has paragon paths, epic destinies, and feats
* Full support for multiclassing and hybrid classing

If you would like to download the book, you can find it here: www.mediafire.com/file/x51ih4a1zhout5i/U...

Thanks!
If anyone here downloads my book, even just for the five new classes, please feel free to write some comments.
Thanks!
We would download it, if it didn't require signing up at a different forum. Frown
We would download it, if it didn't require signing up at a different forum. Frown


+1

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/20.jpg)

Look at my Playable Illithid, my Monster Generating excel file , my Lifestealer in progresss (Heroic tier almost complete!) , our Improved Orc, our Improving Kenku and our Improving Duergar
Also, take a look at my friend's Improved Minotaur, Gadren's amazing Arcane Archer and of course the Avatar Project
More links! Qube's Block Builder, Classless D&D and the characters I've created using the classless system.
Same. Host it at any of the loads of free file hosting sites.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"

"Your advice is the worst"

Ah, right--forgot about that. I figured a lot of folks here might already be members of EN World. It is free to join, and you can register with any ole junk email.

Still. I will put the pdf on a "no signup" site.
Here is the pdf on mediafire: www.mediafire.com/file/x51ih4a1zhout5i/U...

Thanks for the idea to post it there, Krusk.   Smile
So, any takers now that the book is on mediafire?
Initial reactions:
Larger restrictions on heavier armor punishes some classes more than others (a paladin will be a lot more affected than a swordmage or warden, despite all of them being defenders).  Just a note, didn't know if you'd thought about and accepted that.
Skirmisher is interesting, though it seems weak at first glance.
Only looked at 1st level Alchemist stuff, but it seemed exceptionally weak as a controller.
Brute is a defender, but doesn't provide a mark debuff (all other defenders hand out -2 to hit if the adjacent or marked target attacks someone else).
Brute gets off pretty cheap by being able to go completely weaponless.
Psywarrior, while I like the idea behind the class, a psionic without even having new at wills to look forward to when they level up or anything just seems a bit bland.
Champion is interesting.  I think the full aoe heal of Heartening Call can be a bit overpowered, and the minor action saving throw grant with adders is pretty darn powerful as well, though balanced with having no at will attacks, it might be alright.  As a side note, I noticed the Champion flavor text box mentioned halflings and half elves as being Champions, which doesn't make a whole lot of sense in a world where you're only allowing humans.
Thanks for the comments, Vorne.

This game world doesn't have paladins or swordmages, so that's no problem. In a low-fantasy setting, heroes simply don't regularly walk around in full armor with large shields.

Skirmisher is not a high-damage dealer, but they do get mobility even better than rogues, and many, many powers to force movement, daze, and knockdown.

The psywarrior is my "essentials take" on a psionic class. Rather than swapping powers out every level or so, for a nominal bonus, I simply put the augmentations into the base at-wills. The psywarrior is customized via the at-will stances more than anything else.

The Brute gets the Tough Customer class feature instead of marking. I wanted to make a non-marking defender on purpose. They do, however, have some powers that mark targets. As far as going weaponless: it is a similar mechanic to the monk, except that instead of the "slotless" ki focus, they use the arms slot for an implement.

As far as mentioning races, deities, and so forth--good eye. I wrote the classes originally as a stand alone, then brought them into my book. In other words, I wanted the classes to be usable in any game setting. I will make a note of that in an introduction to the classes.

Good feedback
Just wanted to throw it out there that I do plan to read this, sometime between tonight and tommorow evening. PM me if I forget and you are going to die without my awesome feedback.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"

"Your advice is the worst"

This actually sounds just like the kind of campaign setting I could enjoy. I'm looking forward to reading it!Smile

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/18.jpg)

Cool, thanks.

I tend to only mention problems or things I don't like. Overall I think it was good, and actually saved it for the possibility of running a game there one day.


Overview- This interests me. I would like to play it. Queston. If there is limited space, expanses of nothingness seem strange. Wouldn't you have a dense crowding together? I'd almost rather see one giant city, square. The edges of the city literally have "The grey" a wall that goes seemingly infinately high and deep. It slowly closes in, maybe as much as a cenitmeter each year. The closer to the center the more expensive things get.

People under the False Sky- HE brought them here 200 years ago with a specific goal. He just never told them? Seems like elves could have potentially been there and simply asked "Hey whats with bringing these new guys here?" Generations later. Like 3? This whole section is sort of weird, and mish-mashed. Religion is largely an afterthought, but they were totally brought here by a specific guy they know exists for a specific purpose. They just don't listen to him. Also this happened to my grandparents parents.

All the sladii and gith stuff make it seem high magic, or at least high psionic. You keep saying it isn't though. Dragons, aberations and undead don't help. Can't people say "oh that isn't magic its psionics"?

It comes off like you are DMing a high magic setting, but really wishing it were low.

Your gith come off like tolkiens elves. This is not a good thing.

Hero points are cool.

Traits were very cool. I like that idea a lot for what is essentially an all human game.


Typo.
Martial Classes. .... Because of this material from the Martial Power and Martial Power 2 supplements are/will be. (not is) extremely useful....




"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"

"Your advice is the worst"

After glancing through everything, I noticed a couple of things.

- Hero points are a pretty cool idea.
- Traits are a pretty cool idea.
- Ending markedness as an at-will is overpowered (Canny trait).
- Love the idea of recharging powers on a PC.
- Like the idea of a defender that doesn't mark.
- Champion doesn't seem fun to play. Basic attacks, 1 encounter attack power that has the power of an at-will, no utility powers, no choice in what new powers are gained. I suppose you replaced the choice of powers with powers that upgrade a lot, but the choice aspect is lost. Basically a lack of fun and interesting powers. Only interesting thing was moving allies as a move action. You could instead of automatically upgrading existing powers have the players choose how they want to upgrade their existing powers. Would be an interesting feature that no other class has.
Get your Microsoft Word Monster Statistics Block Template here! My Campaign
Yeah, I must also comment on the fact that it doesn't seem like you fitted the setting together appropriately regarding the fact that it had only been 6 generations (if you calculate a generation as about 30 years) since the First arrived in the Land. In other words, the earliest humans in the land goes only as far back as to be a current human's great grandparent's great grandparents. I understand that you represented this by the fact that the Land is still sparsely populated, but in any case, parts of the descriptions you give of the world almost presents it as rather ancient. Still, it's nice to have a setting with a "fresh start".

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/18.jpg)

Also, I'm really looking forward to the DM's guide. Perhaps it may answer why the Twilight Wastes contain undead, among other things.

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Haven't had a chance to read through it yet, but base don comments here, and your own comment, you want this to be low-magic/fantasy. That's all well and good but I think you may have some misconceptions as to what that means. If you think that in a low-fantasy settign people don't use heavy armors, or possibly wear them when on duty, you'd be way wrong. If you want a really good example of low-magic check out A Song of Fire & Ice, specifically Game of Thrones (watch the TV series if you have a chance to in fact), it does low-fantasy very very well.  

Overview- This interests me. I would like to play it. Queston. If there is limited space, expanses of nothingness seem strange. Wouldn't you have a dense crowding together? I'd almost rather see one giant city, square. The edges of the city literally have "The grey" a wall that goes seemingly infinately high and deep. It slowly closes in, maybe as much as a cenitmeter each year. The closer to the center the more expensive things get.

People under the False Sky- HE brought them here 200 years ago with a specific goal. He just never told them? Seems like elves could have potentially been there and simply asked "Hey whats with bringing these new guys here?" Generations later. Like 3? This whole section is sort of weird, and mish-mashed. Religion is largely an afterthought, but they were totally brought here by a specific guy they know exists for a specific purpose. They just don't listen to him. Also this happened to my grandparents parents.

All the sladii and gith stuff make it seem high magic, or at least high psionic. You keep saying it isn't though. Dragons, aberations and undead don't help. Can't people say "oh that isn't magic its psionics"?

It comes off like you are DMing a high magic setting, but really wishing it were low.

Your gith come off like tolkiens elves. This is not a good thing.




Thanks for the comments.

1. The Founder wanted to create a small world, not just a city. Also, the "just a city" idea has been done in Sigil and Union. The expanses of empty space weren't always thus--there are ruins from the First civilization, too.

2. There are no elves--the world was created from the Maelstrom. Everything there was brought, created, or came with the slaadi later on. It is weird that folks have little memory or knowledge of something 200 years ago. It should be weird--what the heck happened? That is central to the backstory of the Land. The religion question is strange, too--they are aware of a creator, but he doesn't act like a god. Why?

3. This setting is like Fahrd and Gray Mouser: magic and monsters exist, everyone knows about them, but they are usually bad. Psionics are rare, but tolerated. In a given campaign, there will likely be zero or one psionic character. The players might meet a couple low-powered psionic NPCs. Likewise, no magic item shops. It is "low fantasy", not "no magic". Though there are monsters, the more unusual and magical ones don't make an appearance until paragon level, typically.

4. The gith have a very different agenda than Tolkien elves.

There is also a DM Campaign Guide, which I am still writing. This DM book contains the full backstory, example adventures, a simple map/atlas, and lots of adventure hooks.

After glancing through everything, I noticed a couple of things.

- Hero points are a pretty cool idea.
- Traits are a pretty cool idea.
- Ending markedness as an at-will is overpowered (Canny trait).
- Love the idea of recharging powers on a PC.
- Like the idea of a defender that doesn't mark.
- Champion doesn't seem fun to play. Basic attacks, 1 encounter attack power that has the power of an at-will, no utility powers, no choice in what new powers are gained. I suppose you replaced the choice of powers with powers that upgrade a lot, but the choice aspect is lost. Basically a lack of fun and interesting powers. Only interesting thing was moving allies as a move action. You could instead of automatically upgrading existing powers have the players choose how they want to upgrade their existing powers. Would be an interesting feature that no other class has.



Thanks for the feedback!

The remove-a-mark power is quite good--I could downgrade it to an encounter power. On the other hand, it is an immediate reaction, so it uses up the PC's immediate action, and doesn't help if you get marked again before your turn. I will have to think about that one.

The Champion is specifically designed for the player who does not want a array of powers to choose from. Otherwise, the player would make a warlord. There are definitely players out there that want less choices, not more.


Yeah, I must also comment on the fact that it doesn't seem like you fitted the setting together appropriately regarding the fact that it had only been 6 generations (if you calculate a generation as about 30 years) since the First arrived in the Land. In other words, the earliest humans in the land goes only as far back as to be a current human's great grandparent's great grandparents. I understand that you represented this by the fact that the Land is still sparsely populated, but in any case, parts of the descriptions you give of the world almost presents it as rather ancient. Still, it's nice to have a setting with a "fresh start".



Thanks!

I could easily revise this part of the setting to be 10 or 20 generations--based on the comments, I think I will do just that. Smile


Haven't had a chance to read through it yet, but base don comments here, and your own comment, you want this to be low-magic/fantasy. That's all well and good but I think you may have some misconceptions as to what that means. If you think that in a low-fantasy settign people don't use heavy armors, or possibly wear them when on duty, you'd be way wrong. If you want a really good example of low-magic check out A Song of Fire & Ice, specifically Game of Thrones (watch the TV series if you have a chance to in fact), it does low-fantasy very very well.  



I am basing this setting off of Fafhrd and Gray Mouser, Conan, Elric of Melnibone, and the Iron Heroes game. In those settings, magic exists, monsters exist, and heavy armor is rare and often inconvenient (except in planned battles). I am familar with A Song of Fire and Ice.

I suggest you read the Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser stories by Fritz Lieber. More than anything else, those stories represent what I am going for.
I'm not trying to make a world with only subtle magic, or where magic is only used by the bad guys, but where magic is unusual and often dangerous, and mistrusted by common folk. In a typical campaign, there are likely to be no magic or psionic characters at all, and PCs likely won't have any magic items until mid-paragon level (and only low-powered ones with drawbacks at that). That says low fantasy to me.


For a good description of low fantasy, with oodles of examples, try TV Tropes: tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/LowF...



1. The Founder wanted to create a small world, not just a city. Also, the "just a city" idea has been done in Sigil and Union. The expanses of empty space weren't always thus--there are ruins from the First civilization, too.

2. There are no elves--the world was created from the Maelstrom. Everything there was brought, created, or came with the slaadi later on. It is weird that folks have little memory or knowledge of something 200 years ago. It should be weird--what the heck happened? That is central to the backstory of the Land. The religion question is strange, too--they are aware of a creator, but he doesn't act like a god. Why?

3. This setting is like Fahrd and Gray Mouser: magic and monsters exist, everyone knows about them, but they are usually bad. Psionics are rare, but tolerated. In a given campaign, there will likely be zero or one psionic character. The players might meet a couple low-powered psionic NPCs. Likewise, no magic item shops. It is "low fantasy", not "no magic". Though there are monsters, the more unusual and magical ones don't make an appearance until paragon level, typically.


4. The gith have a very different agenda than Tolkien elves.



1- That was just me brain storming off your idea into one of my own. Then throwing it out to see if anyone else thought it might be cool. (The difference with sigil/union being a finite space, that is ever shrinking. Gives the setting a neat twist, where everyone knows the end date of the calendar)


2- You get what I mean though right? Its fantasy world. It is very possible that sentient things were around to watch him drop these guys off. Also, how does one act like a god? I would expect at minimum people to send him prayers, and sacrifices. If he ignores them completely that is fine, and could play into the religion. The idea that a sentient all powerful thing exists, interacted with them, and told them "I put you here for a reason" but no one cares about him seems weird.


3- I get low fantasy. My point was, you keep talking about all these epic scale threats, giant dragons, psionic monsters, elementals, ect, but then talking about how no one does magic and it is very low fantasy, or "Realistic". You keep saying "This is low fantasy" but the text presented is not.


4- Their agenda isn't what I was talking about. Tolkien's elves are criticised for being basically perfect in every way and better than all other races because {Author Fiat}. Basically a Mary Sue.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"

"Your advice is the worst"

1. Sounds good, actually. I don't expect many folks to take my campaign world and use it as is.

2. I get your meaning. Still, in this world, there was nothing before the Founder created it. Humans were the first sentients there. Then came the slaadi, the gith, and The Faceless, and so on. As far as caring about the Founder, some worship him, all acknowledge him, yet he seemingly does not interact with the people. It is one of the mysteries of the Land.

3. Hmm. Maybe you focused a lot on a couple sentences in the opening. Most of the game centers around the PCs day-to-day lives (see p. 7). Also, here is an excerpt from the DM book I am writing:

"

               A campaign Under a False Sky is mixture of low and heroic fantasy. The stories of Conan, Elric, and Fafhrd and Gray Mouser are the basis for this type of campaign. The characters are heroic, to be sure, but lack most of the overt magical power common in Dungeons and Dragons. The following tropes are in play:


               Unlikely Heroes. Player characters become heroes as a consequence of motivations other than the desire to be do-gooders. Most characters partake of the adventuring life to gather wealth, to explore the world, or to ease their boredom. The most common alignment will be unaligned, with some good, and a few evil.


               Gray Morality. With no forces of good, the main conflicts in the Land are among the forces of destruction (slaadi), corruption (Faceless), and balance (gith). Human society is the battleground, but human city-states also fight among themselves. Characters are usually on the periphery of these conflicts (until paragon or epic level), and might work for different sides depending on their motivation. PCs are unlikely to become devoted members of a slaadi cult or Faceless spies, but they could become entangled with nefarious organizations. In all likelihood, the characters will generally work for the common good, especially if there is something in it for them.


               Episodic Stories. Try hard to create short adventures with 2-5 combat or skill challenge encounters. This campaign should feel like a series of connected short stories, rather than the chapters of a novel. Each tier of play could feature a longer adventure that takes place over two or three sessions. Persistent NPCs and the occasional recurring villain provide some background continuity. Encourage the players to develop their PCs—characterization should be a driving force in the campaign.


               Personal Scope. Heroic tier adventures should be about survival, taking jobs, or dealing with the vagaries of life in the Land. Heroic characters most likely find adventure in cities, towns, or on the road. Paragon characters also spend most of their time in these locations, possibly using them as bases to explore the wilderness, the Sea, or even ruins of the First. Paragon characters (especially those with certain backgrounds) also might be involved in politics, military clashes, or the criminal underworld. Epic characters have likely attracted the attention of the slaadi, the Faceless, and the gith. Likewise, they possess the skill and power to explore the deepest ruins, the Twilight Wastes, and possibly the Founder’s Isle.


               Humor and Horror. Heroic tier adventures are more likely to have a comic tone than a serious one. That’s good, and it will help offset the more serious adventures to come. As characters advance in level and uncover the disturbing secrets of the Land, stories can become dark or horrifying. Unless you want to make a campaign featuring this tone, allow the mood to lighten up between adventures, or even run some “day in the life” adventures at higher levels.


               Mundane Settings. As noted above, most adventures occur within cities, towns, and roads. The next most common locations are forests, rivers, and the foothills. The mountains, the ruins of the First, and the Sea feature dangerous creatures, but are still fairly normal surroundings. Adventures in the Twilight Wastes, islands far at sea, or even in the Maelstrom, are typically reserved for epic tier play.


               Suspicious Sorcery. Most folk (not just commoners) are suspicious all forms of magic, including psionic power. Those known to practice arcane magic are prosecuted as law-breakers, and are assumed to be in league with the slaadi or the Faceless. Characters that have non-human aspects to their appearance (slaad-cursed, those tainted by the Faceless, or Planar Castaways) must disguise themselves or risk being arrested or attacked. The PCs should have a healthy dose of arcane skepticism, too. When they find a new magic item, they should be more worried about what it will do to them, rather than how they will use it."


 


4. The Gith are by no means the Mary Sue. They are few in number and generally occupied with keeping the Land together.
What gave you the impression that they are better than the humans? Or that they are perfect in every way?
Is it because players are not allowed to use them?


 


 

My reasons.



  • most don't use psionics. Except the Gith who do all the time.

  • They live in their own pretty cool citadels, while everyone else is dirt farmers.

  • The gith battle the sladii while the humans can just run and hide from them.

  • have any and all magic items. "Items that use psionic power are known, but are still exceedingly rare, and usually are sought after by the both the gith and the Faceless"

  • ***edited in*** I didn't notice players can't play them. That does not help the case.


They are magic, live far from everyone else in awesome castles while everyone else lives in the dirt, are the only ones who can battle the evil, and have all the magic items. *** also players can't be them.


Also, I'm not normally this guy at all but in rereading it...

"The physical appearance of the people of the Land varies widely, since the First were drawn from a mix of human stock. The ruling family of Serras is noteworthy for having fair skin, dark hair, and green or hazel eyes. Among the populace, moderate skin tones and hair colors are more common than very dark or light ones. "

Comes off pretty racist. The ruling powers are known for being super white.The commoners are moderate in skin tone, and dark tones are rare. When creating a new fantasy setting it is your chance to flip cultural norms, expectations, and stereotypes on end. Why not have a ruling family that is very dark, and the the bulk of the populace moderate to pale. It just seems un-neccessicary to include skin tone at all, and so the inclusion of "Also white dudes are in charge" comes off really weird.

I want to make it clear I am not saying "You are racist for doing this" but rather "This, probably unintentionally, comes off a little strange".

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"

"Your advice is the worst"



2. I get your meaning. Still, in this world, there was nothing before the Founder created it. Humans were the first sentients there. Then came the slaadi, the gith, and The Faceless, and so on. As far as caring about the Founder, some worship him, all acknowledge him, yet he seemingly does not interact with the people. It is one of the mysteries of the Land.



Thats very much a religion.



"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"

"Your advice is the worst"



  • most don't use psionics. Except the Gith who do all the time.

  • They live in their own pretty cool citadels, while everyone else is dirt farmers.

  • The gith battle the sladii while the humans can just run and hide from them.

  • have any and all magic items. "Items that use psionic power are known, but are still exceedingly rare, and usually are sought after by the both the gith and the Faceless"

  • ***edited in*** I didn't notice players can't play them. That does not help the case.


They are magic, live far from everyone else in awesome castles while everyone else lives in the dirt, are the only ones who can battle the evil, and have all the magic items. *** also players can't be them.




The gith are not DM PCs, and you are reading a lot into my description. Maybe someone else could, too. You reveal a lot about your own preferences in your commentary, assuming that the gith play a major role in every campaign, and that everyone would want to play one.

Gith
* Use psionics, but PCs can, too. A character can even be a multiclassed psionics user (a wild talent), as noted in the book.
* Live monastic existence in the wilderness and near ruins--not in "cool citadels"; I don't think I wrote anything like what you said. PCs, on the other hand, can choose to be from rich families living in the lap of luxury. Most common folk live in cities, not as dirt farmers.
* The gith battle the slaadi, yes. PCs do, too, at higher levels. Common folk usually interact with the slaadi by becoming involved in a cult (willingly or unwillingly).
* They don't have "any and all magic items". I'm not sure why you thought this: they "seek them out", because magic items are usually cursed, and psionic items might prove useful in their struggles. PCs seek out special items, too.
* They serve at the pleasure of the Founder, so they are not free to seek their own destinies. This makes them bad choices for PCs. Also, they are in on part of the mystery of the Land. Think of players playing a Darklord (even a minor one) in a Ravenloft campaign. It is possible, but it changes the nature of the game greatly.The Gith are part of the setting. They are not individually characters, in general.

They are not the only ones that "battle the evil". In a sense, they are a force that merely holds chaos at bay--perhaps they cause stagnation. Think of the conflicts in the Elric stories. The PCs, on the other hand, might actually be the ones to carry the fight--or not, depending on the campaign.


Also, I'm not normally this guy at all but in rereading it...

"The physical appearance of the people of the Land varies widely, since the First were drawn from a mix of human stock. The ruling family of Serras is noteworthy for having fair skin, dark hair, and green or hazel eyes. Among the populace, moderate skin tones and hair colors are more common than very dark or light ones. "

Comes off pretty racist. The ruling powers are known for being super white.The commoners are moderate in skin tone, and dark tones are rare. When creating a new fantasy setting it is your chance to flip cultural norms, expectations, and stereotypes on end. Why not have a ruling family that is very dark, and the the bulk of the populace moderate to pale. It just seems un-neccessicary to include skin tone at all, and so the inclusion of "Also white dudes are in charge" comes off really weird.

I want to make it clear I am not saying "You are racist for doing this" but rather "This, probably unintentionally, comes off a little strange".




I can see the concern here. The Ulvars family is notoriously cruel, so this might cast white people in a bad light. I simply picked a distinctive appearance for the ruling family, and I liked the idea of fair, dark, and green. But "super white"? Again, I think you were reading into what I wrote and took away a much different meaning. The bulk of the population has moderate skin tones because a mix of different people, over generations, without race/skin prejudices, would eventually have a population of moderate skin tones.

As far as flipping cultural norms? I wasn't thinking along those lines. Let's see--how about this? Homosexuality is treated as just another character trait of no special importance.


I can see the concern here. The Ulvars family is notoriously cruel, so this might cast white people in a bad light. I simply picked a distinctive appearance for the ruling family, and I liked the idea of fair, dark, and green. But "super white"? Again, I think you were reading into what I wrote and took away a much different meaning. The bulk of the population has moderate skin tones because a mix of different people, over generations, without race/skin prejudices, would eventually have a population of moderate skin tones.

As far as flipping cultural norms? I wasn't thinking along those lines. Let's see--how about this? Homosexuality is treated as just another character trait of no special importance.



Looks like we are gonna disagree on the gith.


Skin tone- they are known for their fair skin. Everyone else is moderate. They are super (Extremely) white in comparison to others. I didn't see anywhere that they were jerks, but I may have missed it.


Homosexuality- Just like skin tone, there is no need to include this blurb at all. But if you do, I guess this would be an ok way to do so.


My main point on flipping norms was that it seemed weird that you bothered to include the skin tone bit at all, and so that you included it and it was "Enforcing the stereotype of the real world" seemed like a weird thing.


 



"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"

"Your advice is the worst"

Like I said, I can see how this description might be off-putting to some. I think I will keep the dark hair and green eyes, and lose the skin tone.

I made the homosexuality example was that flipping cultural norms just because it is a novel setting sometimes can come off strange or forced.

In any case, I appreciate your commentary.

As for the Gith, there is much more information about their role in the DM book I am writing. Simply put, they are really part of the setting, not main characters. If players really wanted Gith PCs, it could be done, but the campaign would be very different. A better idea would be to use a different campaign world.

In any case, the book can be used for the Hero Point mechanic, different encumberance/wealth rules, and new classes/feats. Some might find the background and trait system useful in other monoracial games, too.
I have to agree with DMattachine here. Changing societal norms for its own sake in a new setting is rather silly and comes of as forced. In a roleplaying game, you could even argue that it is detrimental, as it may destroy immersion for some.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/18.jpg)

I've actually read it twice. I skipped the classes section the second time.I never said challenge norms for the sake of challenging norms. Just that it comes off weird to be like... "Also in this setting whit-ie is in charge."


If you are going to bring that sort of thing up, you ought to use it as your chance to flip things around. Again IF you include it at all. I personally wouldn't and usually don't.


Its clear you only skimmed my posts without examining them extensively.


As for arguing that its detrimental, well you can argue whatever you want.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"

"Your advice is the worst"


I've actually read it twice. I skipped the classes section the second time.I never said challenge norms for the sake of challenging norms. Just that it comes off weird to be like... "Also in this setting whit-ie is in charge."


If you are going to bring that sort of thing up, you ought to use it as your chance to flip things around. Again IF you include it at all. I personally wouldn't and usually don't.




I never said challenge norms for the sake of challenging norms.



you ought to use it as your chance to flip things around.




Do you see the problem?

And honestly, your whining about the fact that he passingly mentioned that a SINGLE royal family, who as he mentioned weren't very admirable to begin with, are pale-skinned comes of as awfully childish to me.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/18.jpg)

By the way, I removed the skin color, but kept the distinctive eyes and hair. I could see someone thinking I was "anti-white".

As for the Gith, you missed the point. They are an element to the campaign. I could just as easily have made them a mysterious race with few details, but chose the Gith to give a connection to existing D&D canon.
It's possible that anyone upload again the pdf???? I want download it, but I can't fine nowhere

thanks