Can you make a move action at-will into a shift?

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If I have an at-will power that works as a move action, can I take that move action as a shift?

For instance, the Acrobat's Trick of the Thief. Can I use that to shift and therefore get a +2 damage bonus? 

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No.  Shift is it's own move action; you can't change normal movement granted by a power into a shift (unless the power itself gives you that option, of course).
Unless you are adjacent to an enemy you could simply just move 1 square.
You can however take a move action and move 0 squares. If you are already in position you can activate your move power and stay where you are. You can even make a stealth check if you have superior cover or Total Concealment even though you never left your square.
You can however take a move action and move 0 squares. If you are already in position you can activate your move power and stay where you are. You can even make a stealth check if you have superior cover or Total Concealment even though you never left your square.


That's why I lurk around here.  I would never have thought of a 0 square move action.  Kudos.
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From the Glossary:

Examples of a move action: walking, shifting

Definition of move : whenever a creature, an object, or an effect leaves a square to enter another, it is moving. Shifting, etc

So a shift is fine Smile



It really depends on the power and it's wording.

For Example if the power says: move your speed.
That is what you do. You cannot shift (or run for example)...and there are powers that say "shift". The power is not granting you a move action, it is telling you to move.

For Example if the power says: Take a move action. Then you could shift, because shift (or run) are move actions.

So for your questions with Acrobat's Trick. It says "Move up to your speed -2". So you could not use it to shift. (or negate the minus 2 by running instead).
It really depends on the power and it's wording.

For Example if the power says: move your speed.
That is what you do. You cannot shift (or run for example)...and there are powers that say "shift". The power is not granting you a move action, it is telling you to move.

For Example if the power says: Take a move action. Then you could shift, because shift (or run) are move actions.

So for your questions with Acrobat's Trick. It says "Move up to your speed -2". So you could not use it to shift. (or negate the minus 2 by running instead).



I agree with this one.  Shift, Walk, and Run are all move actions.  You're already using your move action to do a power and the power dictates what you can do.  You can't do a Shift, Walk, or Run because you've already taken more move action.  You're limited to what the power says you can do.

For instance the Genasi Watersoul power Swiftcurrent says that you can shift up to your speed.  You can't combine that with a run to do a running shift and get two extra movement out of it.  You also can't change it to a walk so that you voluntarily provoke opportunity attacks or avoid the effect of a power that does something to a creature when they shift.

However if your party's Warlord uses Knight's Move to give you a move action as a free action you could use that move action to Shift, Walk, or Run because it's a move action.
From the Glossary:

Examples of a move action: walking, shifting

Definition of move : whenever a creature, an object, or an effect leaves a square to enter another, it is moving. Shifting, etc

So a shift is fine




Nope, sorry.

If a power says "And you move X squares" or "Move your speed" or similar in the Hit or Effect lines, then by RAW you are not free to turn that into a Shift.

If a power says "And you may take a Move action", then by RAW you are free to use it to Shift, stand up from prone, use a Move-related power etc. However, AFAIK this sort iof thing is very rare or non-existent.

Knight's Move

With a sharp wave of your arm, you direct one of your allies to a more tactically advantageous position.


Encounter        Martial
Move Action      Ranged 10


Target: One ally


Effect: The target can take a move action as a free action.




This one would allow you to shift, as it grants a move action. A few powers like this do exist, but they are indeed rare. Usually they involve someone else sacrificing an action for it.
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It wouldn't, however, allow you to shift with Acrobat's Trick - that was the original question, whether you could use a specific move action power that allows you to move, to instead shift and gain the same benefits.  The answer is no.
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It wouldn't, however, allow you to shift with Acrobat's Trick - that was the original question, whether you could use a specific move action power that allows you to move, to instead shift and gain the same benefits.  The answer is no.



Yes, but I think he was just using Knight's Move to illustrate the difference between a power that would allow a shift and one that doesn't (Acrobat's Trick).

With this power the Thief’s ability to get combat advantage comes so easily that it would be overpowered in my opinion to allow a shift in place of the move action. It’s a restriction on your movement sure, but you swap that out for the bonus of gaining combat advantage to any enemy within 5 squares that isn’t adjacent to one of their allies.


Like somebody else mentioned though you can move 0 as the power reads “move your speed” and still get the effect.


 


Also, due to the power’s wording you can’t Run during that movement as well since that also requires a move action.


I play a thief myself and haven’t had any issues running with the movement restrictions at all. Though I’m also using a dagger so I can do ranged or melee basic attacks.


With this power the Thief’s ability to get combat advantage comes so easily that it would be overpowered in my opinion to allow a shift in place of the move action. It’s a restriction on your movement sure, but you swap that out for the bonus of gaining combat advantage to any enemy within 5 squares that isn’t adjacent to one of their allies.


Like somebody else mentioned though you can move 0 as the power reads “move your speed” and still get the effect.


 


Also, due to the power’s wording you can’t Run during that movement as well since that also requires a move action.


I play a thief myself and haven’t had any issues running with the movement restrictions at all. Though I’m also using a dagger so I can do ranged or melee basic attacks.



Pretty much.  If a thief doesn't have CA every round, it's because he's either dazed or Doing it Wrong™.

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With this power the Thief’s ability to get combat advantage comes so easily that it would be overpowered in my opinion to allow a shift in place of the move action. It’s a restriction on your movement sure, but you swap that out for the bonus of gaining combat advantage to any enemy within 5 squares that isn’t adjacent to one of their allies.


Like somebody else mentioned though you can move 0 as the power reads “move your speed” and still get the effect.


 


Also, due to the power’s wording you can’t Run during that movement as well since that also requires a move action.


I play a thief myself and haven’t had any issues running with the movement restrictions at all. Though I’m also using a dagger so I can do ranged or melee basic attacks.



Pretty much.  If a thief doesn't have CA every round, it's because he's either dazed or Doing it Wrong™.



Of course, if he is dazed, he's still probably Doing it Wrong™. Superior Will FTW! Of course I'm a little biased...I don't think my thief has ever failed a daze save from superior will.

With this power the Thief’s ability to get combat advantage comes so easily that it would be overpowered in my opinion to allow a shift in place of the move action. It’s a restriction on your movement sure, but you swap that out for the bonus of gaining combat advantage to any enemy within 5 squares that isn’t adjacent to one of their allies.


Like somebody else mentioned though you can move 0 as the power reads “move your speed” and still get the effect.


 


Also, due to the power’s wording you can’t Run during that movement as well since that also requires a move action.


I play a thief myself and haven’t had any issues running with the movement restrictions at all. Though I’m also using a dagger so I can do ranged or melee basic attacks.



Pretty much.  If a thief doesn't have CA every round, it's because he's either dazed or Doing it Wrong™.



Of course, if he is dazed, he's still probably Doing it Wrong™. Superior Will FTW! Of course I'm a little biased...I don't think my thief has ever failed a daze save from superior will.


I always forget about Superior Will (likely because granting me extra saving throws is really just more chances for me to roll 6's...  Cry )

Returned from hiatus; getting up to speed on 5e rules lawyering.

I know people say Superior will is a must have for almost every class, But I couldn’t imagine playing a thief without it.

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