Use of Daily powers during the season

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So I haven't been able to find it specifically anywhere, so I am assuming the rules operate as normal but let me outline my question.

How do daily powers work in the encounter framework?  I am playing at a venue where there are a lot of people every session, so far we've played with a new DM and different players each time.  The DM last time said if we used our daily power in the previous session, we couldn't use it in the current session because we hadn't taken an extended rest.  I don't think Encounters should follow the same rules as a regular game and disagree with him.  Because we don't have contiguous group or DM from week to week, and in theory people could bring and play a new character every week,  I should be allowed to think of each session as a self contained day and ragain the use of my daylies and healing surges each week.

Is there an official ruling on this?  How do other people feel?
Your DM was right.  There are set points in the season for extended rests, and the game assumes you only have essentially one daily power for every four sessions.  You should have a tracking sheet that shows hp/dailies/AP usage/items gained/experience, and you should be bringing it with you from session to session.
I don't think Encounters should follow the same rules as a regular game and disagree with him.  Because we don't have contiguous group or DM from week to week, and in theory people could bring and play a new character every week,  I should be allowed to think of each session as a self contained day and ragain the use of my daylies and healing surges each week.

Is there an official ruling on this?  How do other people feel?


Official ruling is that there are specific points for an extended rest.  Dailies used are expended until you can take advantage of that rest.  If a player wants to bring in a new character each week, they lose the experience previously gained and won't level up.  In this season there are no set points to level. Experience is given out and you level up when you have enough to do so.  Looking at the adventure, if you're playing the same character each week and make every session, you level up at the end of each chapter.
You are mistaken Devyn, the player keeps the xp from character to character, but not loot.
You are mistaken Devyn, the player keeps the xp from character to character, but not loot.

this is how i was treating character changes, but I now have a player that has changed his character for each week of the three weeks of this season and he may yet change again. I'm thinking of setting a hard rule against his swapping of characters. No other player has been so indecisive and fickle.

You are mistaken Devyn, the player keeps the xp from character to character, but not loot.

this is how i was treating character changes, but I now have a player that has changed his character for each week of the three weeks of this season and he may yet change again. I'm thinking of setting a hard rule against his swapping of characters. No other player has been so indecisive and fickle.




Um, based on the material provided in the package he is entitled to do so. Also, he may (may...) be the type of person who has difficulty commiting to something, or likes to experiment with different builds to find what he likes. If that is the case, what is the harm?
You are mistaken Devyn, the player keeps the xp from character to character, but not loot.

this is how i was treating character changes, but I now have a player that has changed his character for each week of the three weeks of this season and he may yet change again. I'm thinking of setting a hard rule against his swapping of characters. No other player has been so indecisive and fickle.




Um, based on the material provided in the package he is entitled to do so. Also, he may (may...) be the type of person who has difficulty commiting to something, or likes to experiment with different builds to find what he likes. If that is the case, what is the harm?

harm may not be the best description of what I am seeing, but each week, he has to give some explanation of why a character wasn't quite right and leaves the group, then bring in a new character.

He began as a shade mage (nether), then swapped to revenant warpriest (death); now he swapped to vryloka vampire. Each successive change has been harder and harder for the adventuring party to accept among their ranks.

I don't think it harms the game, but it does seem disrespectful of other players that are getting into character and settling into the story. Most were not interested in allowing the undead revenant to join them, but his very noticeable symbol of RQ helped ease their minds. Now allowing the living dead vampire was much more difficult, particularly when he explained that he'd need to suck a healing surge from another PC for healing during brief rests.

The party integrity at my store remains pretty consistent during each season; we've got a solid crop of regulars. This means that experienced players are starting to really develop depth when creating characters. The leader-roled PC of the table was not at all interested in having an obvious vampire in their midst; he probably will not provide healing to the vampire.

the players don't have a problem OOC, but the player did have a paladin prepared which he could have brought into a group with only one other defender and plenty of strikers.

I'd prefer the game maintain more consistency and that PCs develop bonds of trust through mutual goals. The referenced PC stated his goal was to be "in Duponde when it returned to the natural realm so that he could hunt the living in that realm" instead of the sad pickings in the Shadowfell; that was part of his pitch as to why he would be an asset to the group rather than a backstabbing killer.

It might be a public event where every player should be allowed to bring the character they most prefer and play in a group, but I sensed that the other players were not pleased to introduce a vampire among the party.  
wait, maybe harm is exactly the best word afterall.
Have you talked to the player?  Might actually find his reasoning behind the schizophrenia.
Sure, we talk plenty. The rules alow it in D&D E, so I can't bar him from doing it.

He's really excited to have a one-month subscription to DDI so that he can use the online CB. He's ADD and can't maintain long-term interest in the characters. He wants to play a deviant, evil super-striker. He's never played D&D before this experience. He's never played in a long-term campaign to understand the value of a persistant character.

He's pretty much a noob that wants to try out everything at once and he admits to that. He knows that he won't gain renown each time he creates a new character from the CB.
I don't see the problem with a player switching PC's ever week.

That is kind of the point of D&D Encounters to get new players to the table and let new and old players try out new classes and such.

If you are looking to have a group that is stable and have them run the same PC's for a long set of encounters then you might want to run a "Home Game" and set those as the rules and not run D&D Encounters.

Just my thoughts.
We have had issues with player who has had "personality issues" in our own group, so i understand your plight. However D&D is differnt things to people. Some love to trick out their character and make it uber and others like simply rolling dice. In public play events you get this type of meshing and the best you can ask for is that everyone is having fun. What I might siggest to him is that he can switch out as many characters as he wants (it seems like he is already to understand that he will get no RP or XP) but ask him to limit the uses of Dailys as they tend to be game breaking.
You are mistaken Devyn, the player keeps the xp from character to character, but not loot.



Where in the text or official materials is this? I have been chastised at the table, by the DM and other players, when I've tried to ask for XP from the first session, when my blackguard ended up taking a dirt nap.

It's encounters, so it's not like it's a BIG deal, since the characters "retire" at 3rd level... But if someone who has the materials can give me a page to show my DM on Wednesday, I'd appreciate it.

It's just the principle of things, you know?

58286228 wrote:
As a DM, I find it easier to just punish the players no matter what they pick, as I assume they will pick stuff that is broken. I mean, fight after fight they kill all the monsters without getting killed themselves! What sort of a game is this, anyway?

 

An insightful observation about the nature of 4e, and why it hasn't succeeded as well as other editions. (from the DDN General Discussions, 2014-05-07)

Rundell wrote:

   

Emerikol wrote:

       

Foxface wrote:

        4e was the "modern" D&D, right?  The one that had design notes that drew from more modern games, and generally appealed to those who preferred the design priorities of modern games.  I'm only speculating, but I'd hazard a guess that those same 4e players are the ones running the wide gamut of other games at Origins.

       
        D&D 4e players are pretty much by definition the players who didn't mind, and often embraced, D&D being "different".  That willingness to embrace the different might also mean they are less attached to 4e itself, and are willing to go elsewhere.

    This is a brilliant insight.  I was thinking along those lines myself.  

 

    There are so many tiny indie games that if you added them all together they would definitely rival Pathfinder.   If there were a dominant game for those people it would do better but there is no dominant game.  Until 4e, the indie people were ignored by the makers of D&D.

 

Yep. 4E was embraced by the 'system matters' crowd who love analyzing and innovating systems. That crowd had turned its back on D&D as a clunky anachronism. But with 4E, their design values were embraced and validated. 4E was D&D for system-wonks. And with support for 4E pulled, the system-wonks have moved on to other systems. The tropes and traditions of D&D never had much appeal for them anyway. Now there are other systems to learn and study. It's like boardgamegeeks - always a new system on the horizon. Why play an ancient games that's seven years old?

 

Of course, not all people who play and enjoy 4E fit that mould. I'm running a 4E campaign right now, and my long-time D&D players are enjoying it fine. But with the system-wonks decamping, the 4E players-base lost the wind in its sails.

Where in the text or official materials is this?



Direct anyone questioning this policy to read page 2, Creating a Character, Changing Characters.
Where in the text or official materials is this?



Direct anyone questioning this policy to read page 2, Creating a Character, Changing Characters.

From the aforementioned Page 2:

At the end of each chapter:
The adventurers take an extended rest, regaining all of their healing surges, hit points, and daily powers.  Also, their action point total resets to one.

Changing Characters:
Players can switch characters during a DUNGEONS & DRAGONS ENCOUNTERS season.  If a player wants to do so, he or she can bring a new character with an amount of experience points equal to the character he or she previously played in the season.  However, the new character does not keep any treasure or items from the previous character.

Leveling: Players need not wait until their characters take an extended rest to level.  DUNGEONS & DRAGONS ENCOUNTERS uses an accelerated XP award system to allow players to experience their characters at levels one, two, and three.

...I've also seen DMs choose to set ALL player characters at the next level at the end of a chapter, even if they've missed a session or two.  It was more fun for the players, and simplified the xp rewards into having 1000 xp at the end of Chapter One, 2250 xp at the end of Chapter Two, and 3750 xp at the end of Chapter Three.  I've kept the "level up" goal in mind when scaling my own game for 3rd-level characters.  (My players have new/continuing characters who will advance to 4th level after next week's session.)


-Alveric "And the sword that had visited Earth from so far away smote like the falling of thunderbolts; and green sparks rose from the armour, and crimson as sword met sword; and thick elvish blood moved slowly, from wide slits, down the cuirass; and Lirazel gazed in awe and wonder and love; and the combatants edged away fighting into the forest; and branches fell on them hacked off by their fight; and the runes in Alveric's far-travelled sword exulted, and roared at the elf-knight; until in the dark of the wood, amongst branches severed from disenchanted trees, with a blow like that of a thunderbolt riving an oak tree, Alveric slew him."

However, if your character dies during an Encounter, do you still gain experience points for that Encounter?

"You can always judge a man by the quality of his enemies." -The Doctor, Remembrance of the Daleks

However, if your character dies during an Encounter, do you still gain experience points for that Encounter?


I approach this as I would any campaign, the character in question would get XP for the creatures, or obstacles he overcame leading up to his death.  Anything after the death of the PC, I would leave out.
Advanced Level TO
Um, where do you guys (the two posters above me) get that.
In Encounters, there is no XP penalty for death. If they attend the session, they get the XP even if the PC dies. Unless they don't continue with that character and make a new one.



Except of course, the fact that apparently you can switch a character and carry over any xp earned by your previous character(s). 
"You can always judge a man by the quality of his enemies." -The Doctor, Remembrance of the Daleks
In Encounters, there is no XP penalty for death. If they attend the session, they get the XP even if the PC dies. Unless they don't continue with that character and make a new one.




Sorry, let me clarify.  This season (and last I believe) had fixed XP ammounts.  In previous seasons the DM had to adjust XP based on party size and creatures etc.  I had always awarded players XP from the encounter up until their death.  If they killed 3 of the 8 and finished 2 of the 3 storyline components they would be awarded XP for what they completed.  In the current season with fixed XP for the encounters I award full XP on character death.
Advanced Level TO
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