Is it REALLY worth it?

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Hey there,

I'm a 3.5 player just converted over to 4e with a different group

i've baught the books and have playing my first session, getting my character idea in mind and knowing exactly where i want to go with it

however, i was just wondering is multiclassing REALLY worth it? I mean, i'm using 4 feats plus losing out on my paragon path for lower level abilites from that secondary class

so my main question is do all you players out there think its worth to multiclass or is it better to stick with the same class?

I might multiclass anyway due to the character i'm playing but i just want your opinion after reading through the rules myself last night

-Kraik
If you look through the 4E Character Optimization boards, you'll note that many builds involve at least some degree of multiclassing. Usually it's only the initial multiclass feat, to qualify as another class (to open up other feat options), or to gain some limited benefit that synergizes with your existing class features. Some builds switch out a single power (usually an encounter attack or utility power) to enable some combo.

I know of no optimal builds that actually go through the whole paragon multiclass route.
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If you look through the 4E Character Optimization boards, you'll note that many builds involve at least some degree of multiclassing. Usually it's only the initial multiclass feat, to qualify as another class (to open up other feat options), or to gain some limited benefit that synergizes with your existing class features. Some builds switch out a single power (usually an encounter attack or utility power) to enable some combo.

I know of no optimal builds that actually go through the whole paragon multiclass route.



this.  it's kinda sad actually that multiclassing is so weak in 4e.

But several of the multiclass entry feats  are substantially more powerful than other varieties of feats, so it's almost always worth picking one up, even if you don't need to qualify for their feats or PPs.
The following two statements are contradictory:
multiclassing is so weak in 4e.


it's almost always worth picking one up


You cannot have an option that is almost always worthwhile and is simultaneously weak. You would have an easier time making the argument that multiclassing is too strong (in fact, the argument has been made on these boards a number of times).
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The following two statements are contradictory:
multiclassing is so weak in 4e.


it's almost always worth picking one up


You cannot have an option that is almost always worthwhile and is simultaneously weak. You would have an easier time making the argument that multiclassing is too strong (in fact, the argument has been made on these boards a number of times).



err yeah sorry.  I meant paragon multiclassing, or even taking several of the powerswap feats.

the entry feats are significantly better than most other feats, and a couple of powerswap options are repeated over and over again, while 99.9% of all powers never get swapped for...and almost no one paragon multiclasses, because it requires a ludicrous amount of feat investment, and offers less return than a real paragon path.

so my main question is do all you players out there think its worth to multiclass or is it better to stick with the same class?



Taking multiclass feats - almost required for nearly all optimized builds.
Taking all multiclass power-swaps and/or paragon multiclassing - nearly always a bad idea.

Its an odd trade off. Really the power of multiclassing comes in terms of opening up more feat selections for combos, but it almost always is just to be considered a member of another class, not to get powers of a second class.

If you want to get powers / features of a second class, then making a Hybrid character (PH3) is a much, much more effective means of doing so than spending a ton of feats and giving up a paragon path, which is a HUGE penalty for a handful of powers.
I would recommend multiclass power swaps if you want the benefits of your first class to apply to powers from your second class (or if you really want to just get a utility from the second class).  Paragon multiclassing has a hefty feat cost for a not-so-good benefit in general, but there are concepts and combinations that would apply better to paragon multiclassing than even hybrids.  After all, hybrids often need Hybrid Talent**, and even with two class features gained via Hybrid Talent, you (usually) still don't get the full benefits of either as a full class.

Hexblades in particular might want to consider paragon multiclassing to Sorcerer, for Sorcerous Power (at the very least) ;)


** sometimes to the point where Paragon Hybrid becomes less a choice than a requirement, even if the only difference between it and paragon multiclassing is that you get Hybrid Talent a free feat instead of an at-will power swap
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57047238 wrote:
If you're crossing the street and see a city bus barreling straight toward you with 'GIVE ME YOUR WALLET!' painted across its windshield, you probably won't be reaching for your wallet.
I Don't Always Play Strikers...But When I Do, I Prefer Vampire Stay Thirsty, My Friends
This is what I believe is the spirit of D&D 4E, and my deal breaker for D&D Next: equal opportunities, with distinct specializations, in areas where conflict happens the most often, without having to worry about heavy micromanagement or system mastery. What I hope to be my most useful contributions to the D&D Community: DM Idea: Collaborative Mapping, Classless 4E (homebrew system, that hopefully helps in D&D Next development), Gamma World 7E random character generator (by yours truly), and the Concept of Perfect Imbalance (for D&D Next and other TRPGs in development) Pre-3E D&D should be recognized for what they were: simulation wargames where people could tell stories with The Best Answer to "Why 4E?" Fun vs. Engaging
I just want to point out now, while hybrids and paragon multiclassing is being discussed, if you are a hybrid and paragon multiclass you get the Hybrid Talent feat for free since you aren't taking a paragon path. It is sneaky, but paragon multiclassing is so terrible it isn't that abusive.
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Nooooo - if you are a hybrid class and choose to paragon hybrid, you get the extra hybrid talent.  If you paragon multi-class, you get to do the same as what happens to a single class character who paragon multi-classes - except you may not be able to do the at-will swap depending on how your DM interprets certain things.
In the past I ran a level 25 Dragonborn Fighter that multiclassed into Sorcerer just for utilities. Take a look through some of the Str based utilities for sorcerers and you will see why. I maybe spent three-four feats to gain powers that were simply mind blowing on a Fighter.

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One of the Players options fluff books talks about getting back the 3 power swap feats you take to paragon multi-class at the same levels you would gain Paragon path features... we did this an it made it totally worthwhile. 
One of the Players options fluff books talks about getting back the 3 power swap feats you take to paragon multi-class at the same levels you would gain Paragon path features... we did this an it made it totally worthwhile. 

What's the name of this book you speak of? I'm looking through the Player's Strategy Guide -- what I consider one of the most fluffy-licious books (YMMV) -- and there's nothing on "getting back the 3 power swap feats you take to paragon multiclass".  Also, I don't really feel the need to remove power swapping, unless you're the type who didn't actually do any power swaps at all.

If you just need one encounter, daily or utility, then the power swap feats are fine.  If you need more than that, then Paragon Multiclass gives you better options.  If you're in the 2nd class just for the feats and/or paragon path, then don't bother with Paragon Multiclass.  And if you want multiple attack/utility powers but don't want to Paragon Multiclass, then maybe Hybrids are a better option.

By the way, the book I mentioned is really good on the suggestions ;)

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57047238 wrote:
If you're crossing the street and see a city bus barreling straight toward you with 'GIVE ME YOUR WALLET!' painted across its windshield, you probably won't be reaching for your wallet.
I Don't Always Play Strikers...But When I Do, I Prefer Vampire Stay Thirsty, My Friends
This is what I believe is the spirit of D&D 4E, and my deal breaker for D&D Next: equal opportunities, with distinct specializations, in areas where conflict happens the most often, without having to worry about heavy micromanagement or system mastery. What I hope to be my most useful contributions to the D&D Community: DM Idea: Collaborative Mapping, Classless 4E (homebrew system, that hopefully helps in D&D Next development), Gamma World 7E random character generator (by yours truly), and the Concept of Perfect Imbalance (for D&D Next and other TRPGs in development) Pre-3E D&D should be recognized for what they were: simulation wargames where people could tell stories with The Best Answer to "Why 4E?" Fun vs. Engaging
I don't know where it is from.  I just peeled through all the books I could think it would be in and couldn't find it anywhere... nonetheless, we ran a few campaigns that way and it worked really well.  I highly recommend it as a house rule and hope to find the suggestion again someday so I don't feel quite so bad about it coming out of left field.  But it worked!
PHB Has the retrain option with the feats mentioned You could retrain them at 11, 12, & 20 and replace your Feats from 4, 8, & 10 (Or when ever you took them first).
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PHB Has the retrain option with the feats mentioned You could retrain them at 11, 12, & 20 and replace your Feats from 4, 8, & 10 (Or when ever you took them first).


Where does it specifically state that you could retrain them without invalidating your choice to paragon multiclass?

p. 28, with May update:

Retraining

Sometimes you make decisions when you create or advance your character that you later regret. Perhaps a power you chose isn’t working with your character concept, or a feat never comes into play the way you anticipated. Fortunately in such a case, level advancement isn’t only a time to learn new powers—it’s also an opportunity to change some of those decisions.
Every time you gain a level, you can retrain your character: change one feat, power, or skill selection you made previously. You can make only one change at each level. When your class table tells you to replace a power you know with a different power of a higher level, that doesn’t count as retraining—you can still retrain an additional feat, power, or skill as normal.
Feat: You can replace a feat with another feat. You must meet the prerequisites of the new feat. You can’t replace a feat if it’s a prerequisite for any other attribute you have (another feat or a paragon path, for example), or if the feat is a feature of your class, path, or destiny (as the Ritual Caster feat is a class feature for wizards). You can replace heroic tier feats and paragon tier feats (see page193) with higher-tier feats, but only one at a time, once per level you gain. For instance, at 11th level, you gain one feat and you can also retrain one of your heroic tier feats, gaining a paragon tier feat in its place. At12th level you can do the same, so you can potentially have four paragon tier feats at 12th level. (You might find that many of your heroic tier feats remain worthwhile well into higher levels, however.)
Power: You can replace a power with another power of the same type (at-will attack power, encounter attack power, daily attack power, or utility power), of the same level or lower, and from the same class—a 5th-level attack power for another 5th-level attack power, for example, or a 22nd-level utility power for a different 22nd-level utility power. You can’t replace a power that’s a class feature (such as a cleric’s healing word or a warlock’s eldritch blast) or a power gained from a paragon path or epic destiny.
Skill: You can replace a trained skill with another trained skill from your class list. You can’t replace a skill if it’s required for a feat, a power, or any other attribute you have, or if it’s predetermined by your class (such as Arcana for wizards or Religion for clerics). If your class requires you to choose one of two skills (such as the ranger, which requires either Dungeoneering or Nature), you can alter your choice by retraining, but you’re limited to replacing one skill with the other.



Bold mine.

Paragon Multiclassing requires Novice Power, Acolyte Power, and Adept Power, and thus you can't replace/retrain any of them.  This is what is stated as the benefits of Paragon Multiclassing:

p. 209:

At 11th level, you can choose to replace one of your at-will powers with an at-will power from your second class.
In place of the paragon path encounter power gained at 11th level, you can select any encounter power of 7th level or lower from your second class.
In place of the paragon path utility power gained at 12th level, you can select any utility power of 10th level or lower from your second class.
In place of the paragon path daily power gained at 20th level, you can select any daily power of 19th level or lower from your second class.

So if, let's say, you're a Brutal Rogue (STR DEX) who paragon multiclassed into Fighter, while you can get Combat Agility via the Agile Brawler feat (effectively making you half-striker half-defender, assuming you already can mark at-will [maybe as a Half-Elf with the ability to mark with Twin Strike]), or maybe you're a WIS type Battlemind who picked Battle Acumen to get Combat Superiority [even though you'd probably never make use of any Fighter attack powers, save for Rain of Steel or equivalent], but until a reference is pointed out where it's explicitly stated that you can opt to retrain your Novice Power, Acolyte Power and Adept Power feats -- in which case, why even bother with the Paragon Multiclass prerequisites? Just rule them away and be happy with it -- you have to stick with the three feats.

Personally I've suddenly become interested in making that Brutal Rogue with Riposte Strike and Battle Awareness
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57047238 wrote:
If you're crossing the street and see a city bus barreling straight toward you with 'GIVE ME YOUR WALLET!' painted across its windshield, you probably won't be reaching for your wallet.
I Don't Always Play Strikers...But When I Do, I Prefer Vampire Stay Thirsty, My Friends
This is what I believe is the spirit of D&D 4E, and my deal breaker for D&D Next: equal opportunities, with distinct specializations, in areas where conflict happens the most often, without having to worry about heavy micromanagement or system mastery. What I hope to be my most useful contributions to the D&D Community: DM Idea: Collaborative Mapping, Classless 4E (homebrew system, that hopefully helps in D&D Next development), Gamma World 7E random character generator (by yours truly), and the Concept of Perfect Imbalance (for D&D Next and other TRPGs in development) Pre-3E D&D should be recognized for what they were: simulation wargames where people could tell stories with The Best Answer to "Why 4E?" Fun vs. Engaging
You can Retrain the Powers from the Previous Levels of (4, 8, 10) to get (11, 12, 20) by doing a Retrain of those Feats at levels 11, 12, 20 or whenever.  You still have the Feats and the Powers from your Multiclass thus still have the prerequisites.

I guess I wan't Clear Before eh?
And also READ the FEATS.
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There is a trick that worked for paragon multiclassing characters in the old Character Builder that would pay off at high epic levels if it is not a bug in the old program.  When you replaced encounter powers at epic tier after selecting the Eternal Seeker epic destiny, the powers gained at 11th and 19th level for paragon multiclassing were listed as options for powers to replace.  This does nothing for the daily powers, but for encounter powers it lets you trade in that 7th level encounter power gained at 11th level for a 27th level -- with the result that you would then have 4 encounter attack powers of levels 13, 17, 23, and 27, a marginal improvement over the encounter attack powers available to a normal character of that level.
You can Retrain the Powers from the Previous Levels of (4, 8, 10) to get (11, 12, 20) by doing a Retrain of those Feats at levels 11, 12, 20 or whenever.  You still have the Feats and the Powers from your Multiclass thus still have the prerequisites.

I guess I wan't Clear Before eh?
And also READ the FEATS.


I'm sorry, but my reaction was based on you explicitly stating "replace your Feats from 4, 8, & 10 (Or when ever you took them first)."
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You are Red/Blue!
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You are both rational and emotional. You value creation and discovery, and feel strongly about what you create. At best, you're innovative and intuitive. At worst, you're scattered and unpredictable.

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57047238 wrote:
If you're crossing the street and see a city bus barreling straight toward you with 'GIVE ME YOUR WALLET!' painted across its windshield, you probably won't be reaching for your wallet.
I Don't Always Play Strikers...But When I Do, I Prefer Vampire Stay Thirsty, My Friends
This is what I believe is the spirit of D&D 4E, and my deal breaker for D&D Next: equal opportunities, with distinct specializations, in areas where conflict happens the most often, without having to worry about heavy micromanagement or system mastery. What I hope to be my most useful contributions to the D&D Community: DM Idea: Collaborative Mapping, Classless 4E (homebrew system, that hopefully helps in D&D Next development), Gamma World 7E random character generator (by yours truly), and the Concept of Perfect Imbalance (for D&D Next and other TRPGs in development) Pre-3E D&D should be recognized for what they were: simulation wargames where people could tell stories with The Best Answer to "Why 4E?" Fun vs. Engaging
Depending on your character multiclassing may or may not be worth it. What do you want your character to accomplish? Can dabbling in another class help? Or do you need to go full paragon multiclassing to pull off your concept? There are characters and concepts I've played where picking up a multiclass feat and one or two power swaps was required, others where just the class' entry feat was required, and still others that didn't need to multiclass at all. You DO NOT need to pick up any of the power swap feats or do the paragon multiclassing option if you don't want the benefits of those options (the OP seemed to suggest that if he were to MC he was forced to take the power swap feats and miss out on a PP he wanted to take because of MCing and this is simply not the case).
Another thing is that most characters built as paragon multiclass (and the feats that require paragon multiclass) wanted a specific combination of two class features or one class feature and one attack.
With hybrid or paragon hybrid you can get get many combos with far less feat cost. 
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Another thing is that most characters built as paragon multiclass (and the feats that require paragon multiclass) wanted a specific combination of two class features or one class feature and one attack.
With hybrid or paragon hybrid you can get get many combos with far less feat cost. 



This is sometimes the case but many features of classes are lost or not nearly as effective in the hybrid process.

A simple example would be a fighter paragon multiclassing into ranger to get the result of Twin Strike  marking two separate enemies. Paragon multiclassing is the way to go as the fighters ability to mark with any attack it uses is rather important. The hybrid fighter may only mark with fighter powers.

Paragon multiclassing is but one tool to achieve a character that away from the norm. Hybrid is just another tool for characters to do something unique. As always, make a character that is fun and enjoyable. If you were successful there, then you made a successful character.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/20.jpg)

The other issue that no one has mentioned is the half elf.  The main benefit of going PMC is to pick up the at will power of another class.  Half elfs can now do this at paragon with just one feat and can even switch out the stat needed to make the attack with adept dilletante.

There might be some instances where PMC is not a terrible choice, but it is rarely the only way to accomplish the goal of picking up an at will the lowest cost.  The only way I see it as worth considering is when you are trying to do something that can't be done with a hybrid or half elf.  Like a monk getting to use twin strike and flurry of blows in the same attack without going half elf because the stats don't line up well.

As others have said it is almost always worth taking an intro feat because it gives you a skill, potentially new implements, some power, and it counts as a prereq for feats and paragon paths.  Occasionally power swap feats are worth it since a class can have a bad level of powers, while another class has outstanding same level powers.  Often the power that is swapped relies on the secondary stat of the, but is the primary stat of the PCs main class.  I have done it once with a shaman who mc into ranger because I wanted the 6th level Weave Through the Fray to help when enemies got adjacent to me and that was a big movement power that keyed off wisdom.  With themes and skill powers this is now needed less since there are more free power swap options.
A side note to this conversation, and I'm sure one that Charop will see in plenty of builds, is that one of the new themes (Order Adept) allows you to pick up wizard utilitities as a non-wizard.  Considering they have some of the best utilities in the game, have something for every class, and that it requires no feats/PP/race it makes it one of the best themes out right now in my mind.

Of course, until it is nerfed.
And the few multiclass feats that do not give skill training are so fun it is OK.
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What I've done in the past is make the power-swap feats free at the requisite levels.  It does not seem to unbalance the game and it makes PMC a bit more attractive.

If you look through the 4E Character Optimization boards, you'll note that many builds involve at least some degree of multiclassing. Usually it's only the initial multiclass feat, to qualify as another class (to open up other feat options), or to gain some limited benefit that synergizes with your existing class features. Some builds switch out a single power (usually an encounter attack or utility power) to enable some combo.

I know of no optimal builds that actually go through the whole paragon multiclass route.


I know of ONE, and it's probably a hypothetical build in that it really super-optimizes one useful thing without much regard to everything else.
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If you look through the 4E Character Optimization boards, you'll note that many builds involve at least some degree of multiclassing. Usually it's only the initial multiclass feat, to qualify as another class (to open up other feat options), or to gain some limited benefit that synergizes with your existing class features. Some builds switch out a single power (usually an encounter attack or utility power) to enable some combo.

I know of no optimal builds that actually go through the whole paragon multiclass route.


I know of ONE, and it's probably a hypothetical build in that it really super-optimizes one useful thing without much regard to everything else.



I have a second. Which like Sir Marks Alot, is hyper-optimized for one thing. This PMC striker attempts to get in 4 attacks each and every round, and rocks triple digit DPR because of it;

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Race; Thri Kreen
Class; Rogue, Brutal Scoundrel

Paragon Path; Paragon Multiclass

Epic Destiny; Martial Archetype


Starting Stats; 18 STR 12 CON 18 DEX 8 INT 12 WIS 10 CHA

Ending Stats; 26 STR 14 CON 26 DEX 10 INT 14 WIS 12 CHA



Feats;

1 Light Blade Expertise

2 Nimble Blade

4 Two Blade Warrior

6 Acolyte Power

8 Novice Power

10 Adept Power

11 Silvery Glow

12 Cunning Stalker (CA when soloing)

14 Courageous Shoot (Gain Prime Shot)

16 Prime Punisher (Use Prime Shot in melee)

18 Called Shot (+5 damage with Prime Shot)

20 Two Weapon Fighting (+1 damage)

21 Light Blade Mastery

22 Brutal Advantage (Add STR mod to damage when you have SA available but don't use it)

24 Prime Hunter (+1 to hit when soloing a creature)

26 Rending Tempest

28 Improved Prime Shot (Prime Shot is +2 to hit)

30 Swift Blade Style



To Hit;

+15 Level

+8 STR/DEX

+3 Proficiency

+6 Magic Item

+3 Expertise

+2 Combat Advantage

+1 Nimble Blade

+2 Prime Shot

+1 Prime Hunter


+41 To-Hit


Damage;

+8 STR/DEX

+6 Enhancement

+6 Property

+4 Silvery Glow

+3 Expertise

+6 Iron Armbands

+5 Shard

+5 Called Shot

+1 Two Weapon Fighting

+8 STR/DEX


+52 Damage



At-Wills;

Twin Strike; +41 to hit; 2d8+44 damage, +8 if both attacks hit



Minors;

Skirmishing Strike (27); +39 vs AC; 3d8+52 and shift 1

Nonchalant Collapse (23); +41 vs FORT; 2d8+52 and knock target prone

Tumbling Strike (17); Shift speed through difficult terrain and enemies and make the attack at any point +41 vs AC; 3d8+52

Trip-Up (Martial Archetype 21); You hit an enemy with a melee basic attack, and then use this +41 vs REF; 1d8+52 and target is slowed until end of your next turn.

Ruffling Sting (Martial Archetype 30); +41 vs AC; 1d8+52

Low Slash (Paragon Multiclass); +41 vs REF; 1d8+52 and Slide 1 and slow

Thri-Kreen Claws (Racial); One, two, or three creatures, +39 vs AC; 3d8+19 +1 per target.



Dailies;

Steel Nettle Rain (29); +41 vs AC; 6d8+52 MISS; Half Damage, SPECIAL; Move your speed before this attack

Circling Cascade (25); Before Attack shift 2 squares; +41 vs AC; 2d8+52 (half damage on miss), EFFECT; Shift 2 squares; +41 vs AC; 2d8+52 (half damage on miss), EFFECT; Shift 2 squares; +41 vs AC; 2d8+52 (half damage on miss). If all three attacks hit the target is dazed (save ends)

Merciless Cut (19); Shift speed before attack +41 vs REF; 4d8+52 and ongoing 10 damage

Cruel Cage of Steel (Paragon Multiclass); +43 vs AC, three attacks; 2d8+52, 2d8+52, 1d8+52. A target hit once is dazed, twice is stunned, three times is weakened, all until end of next turn. MISS; half damage and no status effects.

Utilities;

Dazzling Acrobatics (22); MOVE ACTION Shift twice your speed. You can climb at full speed during this move and have a +4 AC during this move.

Leaping Dodge (16) IMMEDIATE INTERRUPT make a jump check with a +5 bonus when an enemy targets you with an attack.

Combat Tumbleset (10) MOVE ACTION Shift your speed. Can shift through enemies.

Serpentine Dodge (6) MOVE ACTION Use when within 2 squares of at least 2 enemies. Shift 1+WIS mod and gain a power bonus equal to number of enemies you were adjacent to at any one time during the shift.

Tumble (2) MOVE ACTION Shift your speed.

Slip From the Grasp (Martial Archetype) NO ACTION Use when turn starts; Make a saving throw against one effect a save can end, and get rid of slow or immoblised.

Resume the Hunt (Paragon Multiclass) FREE use when you drop an enemy. Move your speed without provoking from the first square you leave. Gain a +2 bonus to all defenses till end of next turn. 


Items;

+6 Radiant Rapier

+6 Radiant Rapier

Epic Tier Siberys Shard of Radiance

Epic Tier Siberys Shard of Radiance

Epic Tier Iron Armbands of Power

Ring of the Radiant Storm

Ring of Free Time



Defenses are not good, and I haven't added any items that aren't necessary to the build. But it should pretty easily make 3 attacks a round if it has to move to its target, 4 if it doesn't.
It multiattacks, which isn't new, but gets more minor action attacks than most any ranger, and it gets to add two stats (via Brutal Advantage).
One-half of the tabletop gaming news podcast Going Last Co-author on AoA 2-3 and 4-1.

Multiclassing in 4e is only weak if you make weak choices.  Of course, most of the potential choices are weak (Rogue PMC to, I dunno, battlemind or something), but so are most of the feats a character is eligible for at any given level.  It is plenty possible to create interesting and powerful multiclass characters if you take the time to weigh out good choices.


 For example, during last summer’s campaign I made a fighter / wizard of the spiral tower that had some really nice synergy.  One of the key elements was the WotST’s encounter power which was a weapon attack against NAD, does 2W damage, and if it hit, my character could make another attack which would daze the enemy and would not cause the power to be expended.  This got to be real fun real fast as my fighter was already optimized for weapon attacks.  Critical optimization added a lot more oomph too as my character would be rolling two attacks most rounds for a single action.  Sure, the second attack didn’t do any damage by itself, but if I rolled a crit it still counted as a crit for all the little extra goodies you can nab off a crit.


 Then you add something like prismatic spray (I think it is spray) that launches a party-friendly burst hitting everyone in the area, marking them all, and making 3 NAD attacks against each target for more crit lovin’.


 If that character had just been a fighter, she wouldn’t be nearly as interesting, and if she had just been a wizard then the WotST paragon class wouldn’t have been nearly as good for her. 

Rule one isn’t “The DM is always right.” Rule one is: Everyone should be having fun at the table. Plans for 5e: Kill the d20, and replace it with a bell curve for task resolution.
What I've done in the past is make the power-swap feats free at the requisite levels.  It does not seem to unbalance the game and it makes PMC a bit more attractive.




I have done almost exactly the same thing. When you take the MC feat, you are henceforth allowed to choose from your MC's power list when retraining or when choosing powers at later class levels, with the restriction that you may only have one encounter, one daily, and one utility power from any given MC.
that would make a lot of sense tbh, as it illustrates that you do gain some knowledge of the 2nd class simply by picking it.