[WoA] Wow this is tough

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So I bought Wrath of Ashardalon the other day because the hobby shop was out of ravenloft.  I have tried the solo adventure as a fighter prolly about 4-5 times now and I have been miserably abused every time.  Nothing quick but eventually the masses just become too much and without constant movement the encounters hamper my ability to survive.

Any suggestions or is it normal to have this much trouble even on the solo adventure?  I knew the game was hard but jeez!  I may try and involve more than one person on this first adventure just to see if it's easier with more.
My advice....use your past DnD experience and make some Homebrew rules. Initiative.....resting....whatever...sky's the limit.
It's easier to have tactics when you are more players. I played with a group of 5 last weekend and we had 2 tanks, 1 healer, 1 wizard and 1 rogue (i have both WoA and CR so we brought in both tanks).

It took time, some people died, but we managed to finish a couple of quests without total wipe. The key is to talk with the group and plan your moves. But the games are hard for sure.
I may try a mock playthrough with a few characters and see how that goes.  The game is pretty brutal with how many monsters can mass up along with the traps.
Try running the cleric; being able to heal yourself makes all the difference in the world. The rogue is brutally tough as well if you're going solo.
Not sure if this will help in solo, but a good home rule that we use is that if a character doesn't move off the tile he started the turn on and isn't on an unexplored edge you don't have to draw an encounter card.  Allows for resting and re-grouping in multi here play.   Also seems to 'fit' better.
I was allowing a party to rest in a tile only if they beat a 50% wandering monster role. Makes resting risky but possible.
Here's another example of the brutality of this game.  Played solo adventure. The second encounter card was "hidden snipers" where the only way you don't take damage every single hero phase is if you end your phase on a tile with another Hero, yeah -- it's a SOLO game.  Maybe this should have been taken out? I know the game is random but that is almost worse case scenario.  Did we miss a set up instruction somewhere or is this just the horrible "luck of the draw".  Please advise.   
Yeah, I am getting my butt kicked as well.  I am 0-5 on the first adventure.  Had it on the 4th time where I would have had the damn villian killed in one more turn ,then move to the stairs, and, victory! But alas, I was on my last HP with no healing surges and he got a hit.  So close.  So close.  I've been using the wizard.   Think I'll try with the cleric.
I think the biggest issue is the draw an encounter everytime you don't explore a new tile.  This makes team tactics difficult and you tend to get strung out.  I was figuring on a 50% roll for encounters rather than everytime you don't explore.
The encounter cards hurt a lot. But they're a vital mechanic in endgame for the last few adventures.

I generally treat the game as a Nethack/Crawl and use every tactic needed there:


  • use all your items, use your daily/utility powers without worrying about the consequences too much (except try to save high damage ones for the final boss), if you never get to the final boss then saving up Split the Tree doesn't matter,

  • heal as early as possible because you never know when you're going to pull out an Attack! encounter card (yeah, difficult to do without being a Cleric or Paladin, but the Dwarf Fighter offers an excellent edge as well with Dwarven Resistance),

  • don't get overwhelmed by monsters if you can possibly help it (Long Hallways do not help, I know), encounter cards are rarely as painful as drawing a long Hallway, a sentry, and two Aberrants,

  • and this is weird and not present in Nethack/Crawl, but save up your XP not for leveling but for canceling encounter cards that are way too dangerous; doesn't solve an encounter card that kills you too early in the game, though.


Also, when soloing, play two heroes. Not too difficult to keep track of, and always have one of them be a tank, and one of them be anything else. That way you can still play with your wizard.
Yea, I was taking a beating as well.

The encounter cards being pulled when you don't explore just seems odd to me. It seemed strange to be standing there fighting a bear for 3-4 rounds (I was playing a warrior on the solo mission) and then get hit by fungus and lava and a random bomb.

Before I play with my family I'm going to try to come up with a house rule to reduce encounter cards so they are just used when we get black triangles or when there are no active monsters.

I guess the reason they have it like that is so that we don't just fight one monster at a time before revealing a new room.

I may try a group mission with no healing surges and encounters only on black triangle tiles. Perhaps have the heroes spend 2 XP before drawing a treasure card as well.
Yea, I was taking a beating as well.

The encounter cards being pulled when you don't explore just seems odd to me. It seemed strange to be standing there fighting a bear for 3-4 rounds (I was playing a warrior on the solo mission) and then get hit by fungus and lava and a random bomb.

Before I play with my family I'm going to try to come up with a house rule to reduce encounter cards so they are just used when we get black triangles or when there are no active monsters.

I guess the reason they have it like that is so that we don't just fight one monster at a time before revealing a new room.

I may try a group mission with no healing surges and encounters only on black triangle tiles. Perhaps have the heroes spend 2 XP before drawing a treasure card as well.

If you are "standing there fighting a bear" then you guys are doing it WAY wrong.

There are so many ways to attack things without them attacking back, and if you utilize them the game is easy.

Every single player in the game should be kiting monsters every single turn.

Every single player in the game should be kiting monsters every single turn.



I agree. Use the monster's Tile limitations against him. For example if it says "If the monster is within 1 tile, it moves adjacent to the nearest hero and attacks. Otherwise, it moves one tile closer to the nearest hero.". If you have movement of 6, odds are in many cases that you can move outside of the monster's 1 tile attack range. Many times I will attack a monster and then move forcing others to follow me, only to attack another and move again.
Yea, I was taking a beating as well.

The encounter cards being pulled when you don't explore just seems odd to me. It seemed strange to be standing there fighting a bear for 3-4 rounds (I was playing a warrior on the solo mission) and then get hit by fungus and lava and a random bomb.

Before I play with my family I'm going to try to come up with a house rule to reduce encounter cards so they are just used when we get black triangles or when there are no active monsters.

I guess the reason they have it like that is so that we don't just fight one monster at a time before revealing a new room.

I may try a group mission with no healing surges and encounters only on black triangle tiles. Perhaps have the heroes spend 2 XP before drawing a treasure card as well.

If you are "standing there fighting a bear" then you guys are doing it WAY wrong.

There are so many ways to attack things without them attacking back, and if you utilize them the game is easy.

Every single player in the game should be kiting monsters every single turn.




I was doing the solo mission with the warrior. The only thing I could have done different (correct me if I'm wrong) was hit him and then move 5 spaces. The next monster turn the bear would move one tile and attack me again.

Even if I exploit a weakness in the rules design by going diagonal back and forth over corners to try and get 2 tiles away with a 5 space move, then I still have to move next to the bear to get my next attack.

Personally, I don't want to use 'gotcha' moves to try and exploit the game mechanics to avoid playing the game in way the developers were intending.

I also don't think it would be a great idea to explore a new area every round when solo in order to avoid encounter cards.

If that wasn't the way the developers were intending to make the game, they would have made it different.

For the fighter, use charge. Attack from a distance then move back.

Even if it's not diagonal, you can use sides to your advantage too. Enemy has to move adjacent to you and you're on the side of a tile (which you should ALWAYS ALWAYS be), move him adjacent on the tile across from yours. Next turn you'll be able to attack him then move, most likely into another tile. Now he's two tiles away. Next turn charge him and then retreat back. Do the same again the next turn if possible. If you're getting more than 2 attacks for every 5 you do then you're probably trying to play the game like original D&D and not like a strategy board game.

It's usually a good idea to explore every round, especially if the goal is to unveil a certain amount of tiles to get to an exit/chamber/etc. There are other reasons for this too. The larger the dungeon, the more you can move around, and the more you're revealing the more likely you are going to leave other monsters in the dust, where they have trouble reaching you since you are much faster than them because of squares movement.
If that wasn't the way the developers were intending to make the game, they would have made it different.

For the fighter, use charge. Attack from a distance then move back.

Even if it's not diagonal, you can use sides to your advantage too. Enemy has to move adjacent to you and you're on the side of a tile (which you should ALWAYS ALWAYS be), move him adjacent on the tile across from yours. Next turn you'll be able to attack him then move, most likely into another tile. Now he's two tiles away. Next turn charge him and then retreat back. Do the same again the next turn if possible. If you're getting more than 2 attacks for every 5 you do then you're probably trying to play the game like original D&D and not like a strategy board game.

It's usually a good idea to explore every round, especially if the goal is to unveil a certain amount of tiles to get to an exit/chamber/etc. There are other reasons for this too. The larger the dungeon, the more you can move around, and the more you're revealing the more likely you are going to leave other monsters in the dust, where they have trouble reaching you since you are much faster than them because of squares movement.



Still sounds like it's going against what the game developers were trying to do with the game. Having players move by squares and having the monsters move by tiles was just a way to simplify the 4E rules so we would not have to worry about players controling monsters and not doing double moves and charges and attacks of opportunities to keep players from doing that.

I'd be interested to see how others play to see if that's a common practice.

It also sounds like you're putting monsters into positions where they're making dumb moves since you're controlling them. If it was a DM doing the movements of the monsters you'd not be able to be constantly two tiles away after your move.


Still sounds like it's going against what the game developers were trying to do with the game. Having players move by squares and having the monsters move by tiles was just a way to simplify the 4E rules so we would not have to worry about players controling monsters and not doing double moves and charges and attacks of opportunities to keep players from doing that.

I'd be interested to see how others play to see if that's a common practice.



I'd say it's pretty vital to understanding the game. I do that subconsciously. Really, it makes sense to charge, then retreat, both in terms of the game and in terms of how you would actually attack a bear in real life: by not staying close to it, and dancing away out of its reach; I usually just have one hero lead the monster into the crossfire of another. In many ways, this is a video game in boardgame form. Tactics like this are really important to basic survival.

It also sounds like you're putting monsters into positions where they're making dumb moves since you're controlling them. If it was a DM doing the movements of the monsters you'd not be able to be constantly two tiles away after your move.



What, you mean that a skilled fighter can't maneuvor so that enemies (flunkies at that) end up behind them, to the sides, or in front depending on what's necessary? When the designers need monsters to be smarter, they add to the monster script to reflect that. Have you noticed how many villains kite? Gauth and the Kobold Dragonlord come to mind, while the Rage Drake does what can be thought of as reverse-kiting (I'd love to see a hero with the power of knockback).

It also sounds like you're putting monsters into positions where they're making dumb moves since you're controlling them. If it was a DM doing the movements of the monsters you'd not be able to be constantly two tiles away after your move.



Yes! For the love of Bahamut yes, that is what I'm doing. That's what you're supposed to do. Your goal is to win, and if you have control of monster movements your not supposed to try to make yourself lose with them!

You are not simulating the monsters. You are not playing DM and player together. You are not playing the  D&D roleplaying game. You are playing a strategic boardgame where your singular goal is to win.

It baffles my mind that someone can actually try to win and try to lose at the same time on a single player game. I understand DMing (I do it myself), and making a challenge for other players. But this is single player, and the challenge is already there. How can it possibly be fun to try to make yourself lose?