D&D Puzzles

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I googled around on the topic of D&D puzzles.  I was amazed the lack of decent forum threads out there, or lists, of good, solid, rpg puzzles.  There was lots of 'advice' about how to make good puzzles, but very few actual puzzles listed.  

I was hoping that some people could list their favorite puzzle like rpg encounters in this thread.  

There are a lot of thoughts about the nature of D&D puzzles.  What is a 'good' puzzle and 'bad' puzzle.  In my mind puzzles can be broken down into three main categories:

1. Traps:

These can be defeated primarily through the use of in game mechanics.  

A flexible DM would allow creative solution, and so they can end up being puzzle like.

Example:

Arrow Trap: Perception to spot.  Thievery to Disarm.  A clever player might roll a heavy rock ahead of the group to trigger the pressure plates and exhaust the trap.

2.  Riddles:

These have a single answer.  A riddle with a password, or a specific requirement.

A DM using these should always have a back-up plan if they can't get the answer.  Could range from a combat, to a loss of prestige or something along those lines.

Example:

A chess board (!) with eight queens around the perimeter.  A poem about eight queens who lived in conflict until they learned to exist in the realm without threatening eachother, and only then could the land move on to its next great era.  The players must arrange the queens on teh board so they cannot capture eachother.  

3.  Puzzles:

 An open ended encounter without a single solution.  Ideally solveable through either mechanics or player ideas, or both.

Example:

A room with rotating mirrors.  A gem of light is mounted into a solid dias, and shines south.  A door to the north has a dull gem that needs to be lit up.  The mirrors rotate in various positions.

If a player is reflected in a mirror and within 3 squares then an evil image of that PC emerges and attacks.  The mirrors must be rotated to reflect the light off all the mirrors, the mirrors can be rotated through game skills (theivery or arcana), or the player can realize they rotate toward the nearest PC (and thereby lure the mirror to the right position). A mirror can be anchored by using a str check, or by jamming a rock into the base of the rotating mirror.  The light beam from the gem could also cause damage as the rotating mirrors move it around.  And a PC could always just removed the light gem, or move the dias, to shine the light in directly.  Or use a pocket mirror to divert the light.



That's not the only way to view rpg puzzles.  But it seems to me, to be a breakdown  that makes sense.  Of course you can combine elements of the above, and I think great puzzles are basically made up of riddle/trap combinations.   

Anyone have favorite puzzles you'd like to share?  Or even links to other threads you found useful on this topic? 

Not all players like puzzles.  Some do, this encounter was written for one who did, and was played out as a side encounter while the rest of the group was otherwise occupied in combat.


Encounter 4b:  To the Mountainheart Sanctum


Puzzle Encounter


This encounter is made up of three short puzzle rooms.  The Loremaster must pass through these three puzzles to make it to the Mountainheart Sanctum.  The best way to run this encounter is to provide the player running the Loremaster with a chance to familiarize [himself/herself] with the parameters of the puzzle, then cut to the next player’s encounter to give the Loremaster some time to think on a solution.


The Measuring Puzzle



As you descend into the newly opened passage in the temple, you find yourself in a long tunnel lined with stone panels.  You can see where intricate abstract carvings have been worn down with untold ages of moisture and weathering.  The stone has been marked over with simplistic depictions of hunters, game, and magical creatures.  In one spot, you see the outline of a handprint that was painted with blown soot.


The passage eventually opens into a large chamber at the end of which you see a sealed stone portal.  On one side of the chamber is a stone ramp.  Before it is suspended a large hourglass-shaped device, but with an open top. Two large, differently sized copper basins sit next to the hourglass.  On the other side of the room, a stream of cold mountain water pours through the cavernous ceiling into a shallow pool of water.



The larger copper basin can hold five units of water, and the smaller holds three units of water.  A draconic rune for each number is etched into the bottom of the inside of each basin. 


In order to open the door into the next chamber, the Loremaster must pour exactly one unit of water into the hourglass.  If not enough water is poured in, then the hourglass’ trigger mechanism will not activate.  If too much water is poured in, a concealed sluice in the hourglass opens, emptying it.


The simplest solution to the puzzle is to fill the small tub and pour it into the larger tub, then fill the small tub again and pour just enough in the larger basin to fill it, leaving one unit of water in the small basin.


Alyousa the Crone’s clue for this puzzle was:


 


The first is five,


The second three,


But only a pure one opens me.


History DC 18:  The intricate carvings date to the Arkhosian Empire.  The cave paintings were probably made by early human tribal inhabitants  that settled in the area after the draconic empire collapsed.


Thievery DC 26:  The character finds and deactivates the secret sluice in the hourglass device.


Thievery DC 26:  The character finds the locking mechanism to the stone door.


Stone Door:  This stone door can be burst open with a DC 25 Strength check.


The False Chessboard Puzzle



You travel through a winding, descending corridor, again lined with intricate stone carvings worn with age.  Eventually you emerge into a large vaulted chamber, at the center of which lies an expanse of great stone tiles, alternately colored ochre and cyan.  Four large stone columns support the ceiling, placed near each corner of the room.  From your perspective, the pillars to the right side of the chamber are painted in a fading ochre color, and discolored cyan paint is peeling from the pillars on the left side of the chamber.



Each of the tiles is trapped.  The ochre tiles deal fire damage and the cyan tiles deal cold damage.


Athletics DC 26:  The character climbs along the moisture slick walls of the chamber.


Perception DC 13:  Active only.  The PC finds a secret door in the ochre column on his side of the tiled floor.  The door reveals a ladder that descends into a tunnel that passes under the tiled floor and exiting through a similar door on the cyan pillar on the far side of the tiled floor.


Alyousa the Crone’s clue for this puzzle was:


To find the safe path ‘neath your feet,


Near fiery land mark start to seek,


Meander thence from hot to cold,


And travelling always on the diagonal.


 [Insert Traps]


The Descending Stairway Puzzle



After another short corridor, you enter another vaulted chamber, this one without an apparent exit.  At the center of the chamber is a one-foot deep drop-off, in which you see a grid of burnished copper tiles, laid out in five grids and five columns.  One of the tiles is at the same level as the chamber floor, rather than at the same level as the rest of the tiles.  Directly across from the tile, on the “wall” of the depression, you see a carved image of a tree.



When the Loremaster steps onto one of the tile adjacent (no diagonals) to the initial tile, or the last activated tile, then that tile is activated and all unactivated tiles drop an additional foot into the depression, accompanied by the sound of grinding stone.  Once ten tiles have been activated, the top of a door frame become visible directly underneath the carved image of the tree.  The door opens into this chamber, so it cannot be opened unless the tile adjacent to it is the last one activated.  The puzzle resets itself if the last tile activated would not allow the door to open


Stone Door:  This stone door can be burst open with a DC 25 Strength check.


Alyousa the Crone’s clue for this puzzle was:


For the last challenge there is naught to do,


But take each step then follow through,


The path you take brooks no retreat,


Until the open portal do you meet.

Thank you for asking this question!

I hope to see a lot of great answers for it, as I have absolutely no talent for designing fun, interesting puzzles (or even bad, boring ones - no talent at all for even that much!)

There are a lot of great, creative minds with many fantastic resources here, so if this group can't provide some useful tools and guidelines for some good puzzles, then I don't know who would!
[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
My group's first (annoying) run-in with a published puzzle, with a guest DM running the game:


Dungeons & Dragons Adventure Game (3rd Edition Starter Set)
Adventure 3: Into the Crypt (Room 20: Snakes & Puzzles)

[Set-Up:  The party has just gotten through a couple combat encounters with goblins and hobgoblins in earlier adventures in the campaign, and now a mysterious wizard has hired the party to retrieve a burial shroud from a crypt in a haunted cemetary, before a necromancer does.  After entering the cemetary and descending into the crypt with the name "Hanan" written on the door, the party fights a combat encounter with skeletons, and then advances to the next room in the crypt.]

"This room appears to be completely empty, except for a huge iron door in the wall opposite you. 


  • There are five levers mounted in a row across the center of the door. 

  • All five levers are in the down position, except for the leftmost one, with is in the center position. 

  • On the left edge of the door are three unrecognizable symbols. 

  • One lines up with the top of the levers, with lines up with the center, and one lines up with the bottom.

  • Each wall has the word HANAN written on it in the same old-fashioned script.

  • There is a small hole about three inches wide in the center of the wall to your left."



[spoiler solution]
What happens next is that three vipers, one at a time, slither out of the hole in the wall; nothing triggers that vipers, and the hole has nothing to do with the puzzle (except act as a red herring.)

Solutions:

The Levers:  The levers are a combination lock, and the three symbols represent letters in the family name HANAN, and should be set:  Up, Center, Down, Center, Down.

The Patient Way:  There are 243 possible combinations, and the players may choose to try them all systematically.  This takes d6x10 minutes unless the DM wishes to allow the players to try them all in character (!?!?), and nothing bad happens from trying a wrong combination.  There were no other consequences for using this method, though the PCs were theoretically in a race against the necromancer.

The Brute Force Way:  The door can be ripped from its hinges on a STR roll of 22 or higher, but this triggers a random trap.



I only just now realized that, for some reason, the (inexperienced) guest DM chose not to allow the door to be opened without solving the puzzle correctly, so only the first solution or "role-playing" the second solution in real time were allowed.  This proved to be rather tedious and frustrating in game for the group.

What the puzzle did right:


  • Provided multiple ways around the puzzle, using different styles of game play.

  • Provided some sort of clues, though they were vague, to the solution.


Where the puzzle went wrong (partly by design, partly in the DM's hands):


  • The clues were not very clear; I didn't guess the solution based on the verbal description, and none of the other players seemed interested in the puzzle.

  • With some of the possible methods of solving the puzzle elminated by the DM, the players were railroaded into solving the puzzle out of character whether they wanted to or not; worse, by trying brute force or lock-picking, we got the infamous reply: "You can't do that."

  • The vipers and holes in the wall provided red herrings which, at first glance, seemed harmless, but which distracted players who thought the viper attacks were caused by some combination of the lock, and the holes concealed some clue to the operation of the lock.

  • The puzzle provided no rewards for solving the puzzle correctly, and no in game consequences for using the patient solution.

  • Solving the puzzle the DM's way required out-of-character puzzle-solving, which is not fun for everyone; provide in-character shortcuts (like lock-picking skill rolls, or STR, DEX, WIS, or INT rolls) as well for when the players aren't having fun solving the puzzles for the characters.


[/spoiler]

I think that things I learned from that experience are:


  • Puzzles should have multiple solutions, and DM's should be flexible enough to roll with it when the players come up with creative, logical solutions the designer never considered for getting around the puzzles.  Limiting creative choices is rarely fun for anyone!


  • Not all players like solving puzzles out-of-character; provide in-character skill and/or ability rolls that allow the characters to solve the problems using their strengths, rather than the players' strengths.  Provide rewards for player puzzle-solving (out-of-character awards might be appropriate for out-of-character puzzle-solving:  award a nice set of dice to a player who solves a tough puzzle, for example.)

  • Red herrings are distracting, and players do a good enough job of finding their own red herrings without the DM making things worse.

  • Provide multiple key clues to the best solution; the players are bound to misinterpret, ignore, or miss at least one of the key clues.

  • Puzzles should have more than one purpose or effect on the game, providing an incentive for getting them solved as quickly as possible, or providing an obvious cost for taking a shortcut around them:  traps or combat for breaking the puzzle, costly delays against a time limit or progress in a race against time when using trial-and-error "thousand monkeys on a thousand typewriters" solutions, etc.  Otherwise, they represent only a forgettable annoyance to most players.

  • Puzzles might best be presented right at the stopping point for the night, so that players can consider the solution between game sessions.  The clues should be written down for study, especially when players are given time to puzzle over them at their leisure (it can be easy for forget important clues if it takes the players a couple days to find time to think about the puzzle.)



Those are my conclusions, I've never tested them, and I might be very, very wrong about them.  Any thoughts?
[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
I'd add three things:

1.  The Puzzle needs to be easy.

2.  The Puzzle needs to be one that can be solved quickly.

3.  Typically, the puzzle needs to be optional--it gets your to bonus treasure or a short cut, rather than being required to solve the adventure.

My puzzles violated rule three, but only because I was using them as a timer of sorts and I knew the player in question (and the others with him, though not their characters) could handle them.  The other PCs were simultaneously involved in a "hold out until Puzzle guy can summon magical reinforcements" scenario.

When I was trying to come up with the three puzzles, I went to google books and spent a lot of time looking through 19th century puzzle books (apparently what us nerds did in our spare time before movies and D&D came along).  A lot of those were "how many possible ways could task X be accomplished?"  or "What is the fewest number of steps that are required to accomplish task Y?"  Those are clearly inappropriate puzzles because they violate both rules.

I adapted my first and third puzzles from those I found in these books.  The first one I simplified (only need to get one unit into one of the basins, instead of putting one unit in each basin, which required the use of the original barrel of ale and violated the simplicity rule).

The third I adapted from the sterotypical knight's tour puzzle, but reduced the size of the grid to make things simpler.

The second was my own creation, inspired by the fact that I'm a jerk.
Barvas, you rock!

I think you're right: 

  1. If a puzzle is required to solve the adventure, it had better either be quick and fairly easy to solve, or most players will probably get bored or annoyed. 

  2. If a required puzzle is not quick and easy, it had better be something very special: an immersive, well-designed central element that is an integral and natural part of the campaign, something that all the players are involved in solving through their unique skill sets, with tangible signs of progress toward solution, and other victories to be won and plot lines to follow while solving the puzzle.  Such a puzzle will likely require more work than almost any other element of the campaign, because it is the backbone of the campaign, and your success or failure as a DM or game designer will rest on the quality of the puzzle from a storytelling standpoint.

  3. Otherwise, complex and tough puzzles should, as you said, be completely optional for bonus treasure or a shortcut, so that players only have to solve them if they want to for their own reasons.


Option 2 is probably most suitable in games like Call of Cthulhu or Ravenloft, where a campaign might revolve around solving a mystery over several game sessions, and solving the "puzzle" (mystery) is, effectively, what the campaign and game is all about.

Otherwise, I think that, for most groups and DMs (especially in a dungeon-crawl game), options 1 and 3 are the best.
[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
I'll single handedly keep this thread alive if I have to. 

One thing I think is interesting is combining puzzles/riddles/traps/encounters.  I think the best way to make these things workable, is to stack them, which creates multiple avenues to success.  Example:

 

Dungeon Room Encounter.

Solid stone door at one end of the room.  With a riddle carved above it (in an appropriate language for the builders of the dungeon):

"The more there is of it, the less you see"

(I don't know how to do that hide answer thing, so I put the answer at the bottom of this post)

Pretty simple riddle.  But rather than making the answer necessary to get past the door, just make it part of an encounter.  

A lvl appropriate number of beings of light attack the characters (I will use fire elementals, just change the flavor).  Every round more light creatures materialize anywhere where two bright light sources overlap. 

The door is a skill challenge to open.  

So the players can fight the light creatures and open the door, like a 'normal' dungeon room.  

However, the answer to the Riddle is 'darkness.'  If the players realize this and decide to shut off all sources of light, then the enemies disapear (and don't return when the lights are turned back on).  In addition words appear on the wall that glow in a faint light.  The words spell out some helpful hint for somewhere else in the dungeon, or something about the plot of the game (something that is not essential to find, but provides a sense of accomplishment for the players).

There. 

1.  Easy

2.  Multiple paths


 
Lately I have been adding in extra loot within puzzles. Ex I gave the PCs a box nearly rainbow colored only missing green and made them figure it out. Everyone wanted to role checks to get it open. I did so because their reactions were always let me role and see what i can do. Which is good but i needed and wanted them to start looking at what they were being given creatively.

One thing to ask with puzzles is what you want the PCs to do. Is it just a challenge put in their path? Do you want to reward originality?  Or do you want to stump them to force them in another direction? A sadistic wizard builds a tower full of puzzles do they all have solutions? No he wants you to die! (before using this in an adventure it would be highly important to hint that it could be possible.)
I had a room with three magicaly sealed doors. Each door had an animated head on it, dog, man, lion. The dog door(har har) would open for you easily and would comment on wanting to and pleasing its masters. The man door would only open if you made it jealous of the dog or the lion, he would make insult about the dog and the lion. The lion door would only open if you hurt his pride, if talked to he would make small talk about how he was superior and his door was the best.
They call me... Wyzard!
I'm using a puzzle as a means to get the players to explore.

They enter a tower and the first thing they come across is the puzzle, which, when solved, opens the way to the next level. The puzzle itself is a fairly simple logic puzzle, but all the necessary clues are scattered throughout the first floor (and prominently displayed in their respective rooms). Once they find those clues, getting past the puzzle is fairly trivial. I think it's a good way to give the dungeon an open feel even though in reality the players are required to go through most everything.

However, since it is a required puzzle, and since the players have a tendancy to either overthink the simple or ignore the obvious, I've included a system where trying to solve the puzzle and failing A) hurts and B) provides an additional clue.
I'm using a puzzle as a means to get the players to explore.

They enter a tower and the first thing they come across is the puzzle, which, when solved, opens the way to the next level. The puzzle itself is a fairly simple logic puzzle, but all the necessary clues are scattered throughout the first floor (and prominently displayed in their respective rooms). Once they find those clues, getting past the puzzle is fairly trivial. I think it's a good way to give the dungeon an open feel even though in reality the players are required to go through most everything.

However, since it is a required puzzle, and since the players have a tendancy to either overthink the simple or ignore the obvious, I've included a system where trying to solve the puzzle and failing A) hurts and B) provides an additional clue.




Do you think you could post the puzzle and clues here? That would be awesome.  
Do you think you could post the puzzle and clues here? That would be awesome.  


I can't post the actual puzzle here, as my players haven't come across it (and it may be a while before they do, sadly), and the presentation for my campaign is pretty graphical. So, I'll be generic.

The players have to select a particular symbol while speaking a word. The puzzle has an indeterminate amount of symbols (far, far, far too many for the DM to even bother keeping track, let alone for the players to attempt trial and error). In one room will be a presentation of a set number of symbols, and in another room there will be a presentation of the same number of words. Other rooms present clues of varying subtlety to getting the associations right and finding out which is the word that solves the puzzle (this clue is about as obvious as obvious can be when they come across it, akin to "Say this word to win the game!").

By the time they run through the level, if the players have been fairly sharp and I've done my job well, they've nailed the right symbol/word combination. If they are a bit off or I've been too clever by half, they should still have enough information for a trial and error approach with a maximum of three attempts to get right.

Oh, and if they match a symbol to the correct word, but it's not the one that actually solves the puzzle, nothing bad happens to the players. The puzzle simply confirms that the symbol and word match through a creative and plot-useful way.

Final point: story-wise, the puzzle was not designed to be a puzzle or an obstacle. It's a tool that the residents of the tower use, so I have a reason for it to provide the players with useful information when they fail an attempt. The "bad thing" that happens to the players when they mess up is a side-effect of the tool's operation, and one of the reasons why the formerly well-behaved residents of the tower now need to die.
A good way to make puzzles not required, is to have their solution reveal plot elements as opposed to allowing access to places/loot.
For example: I am running a game where the barrier to the realm of the dead was destroyed, allowing for reincarnation. This coincides with the Raven Queen usurping Nerull. Obviously this change in cosmology ticks off certain gods.

I made a block with the word "KYUSS" in it (a former assistant of Nerull and demigod of creation of undead) and cut it into key shaped sections. The players are going to find the keyring on a corpse, and then if they put it together they get some extra background info. If they don't, or don't even try, theres no loss, my players will just have to wait a little longer to find out who is behind all of the undead. (NOTE if you want your players to know something, you usually have to repeat yourself and make it obvious).
(double post shenanigans)
Weird, my post vanished.  Anyway, I put together some puzzle-ish traps and encounters into a thread here.

You might find something useful there, although most of them are not "pure" puzzles like those described in much of this thread. 
Sadly, puzzles don't tend to translate well to tabletops . . . if only because they are the second most possible means of grinding a game to a dead halt as the players figure out the answer. Players, not characters, mind you. As such, I've tended to make my "puzzle quota" in the current campaign more of an open sort . . . they get clues to piece together and need to use both player comprehension and knowledge-based rolls to get information needed to get the whole picture.

The more notable one currently? The players want to identify and work a metal which none of them know what it is, but they came across when raiding the dragonborn father's hoard (he was a gold dragon who kept a lot of eccentric little objects as treasure). So how do they do this? Here's what they tried, and I apologize for being largely anecdotal in this post

- Knowledge (History): Have they encountered this before? They rolled pretty high but not quite within 5 points, so I pointed out the metal was unfamiliar. But the Dwarf in the party reasoned he might have heard something growing up.
- Intelligence Check: Could the dwarf remember something about this from his life experiences? Nothing really should have happened but he killed the roll with a 19, and I commented he heard about a lot of mythical metals in the past.
- Knowledge (Religion): Mythical metals? Well, that falls under Religion right? So let's try again! He killed this roll too, totaling 33-35 (I forget what the number was exactly but it was a good result.); he recalls growing up hearing tales about how Moradin had made armor and weapons for the first dwarves on his own forge from a metal which was not of this world.
- Knowledge (History): New information! The wizard decided this was a good lead to use to try to find more out. They used what they knew so far of other mythical metals (Mithril and Orichalcum respectively) and the dragonborn dropped a 20 on his dice roll.  Given it was his father who had kept the ore secret, he had heard a word 'Adamantite', but had no idea on context until now.

Now knowing what the metal was, they discussed what to do with it. They had a lot of it, possibly, so they decided to find a way of making it into arms and armor for their stronghold. (I'd previously told them they couldn't advance their defenders any more without special circumstances.) So over the course of four sessions they subtly tried to gather information . . .

- Streetwise: The rogue asked all around when they were in the capitol and learned the empire imported its high-quality metals from the north. So they traveled north, and repeated the efforts.
- Diplomacy: They got a name for the most popular high-quality foundries excepting dwarven settlements, and managed to impress local people enough for some information on the settlement which needed to be reached.
- Streetwise: Once there, the rogue again hit the streets and tried to learn all they could about how things worked. Armed with this knowledge they petitioned the forgemasters to work the strange metal . . . only to be told regular forges couldn't handle it.
- Knowledge (Arcana): The wizard wanted to know if they could adapt something they'd come across before to use magically-enhanced fire to handle it. He didn't need a high result to get a "of course". 
- Diplomacy: The party attempted to talk to the Lady in charge, and while they rolled pretty good (27) the player speaking up really mangled the words and I gave him the chance to reconsider them . . . since he didn't, the party got shut out in the cold. However, they generally considered it a "win" because now they knew the next step to actually working this 'Adamantite'.

Currently the wizard is contemplating if magic rituals can be used to work it instead, using raw magical power to function as tools as opposed to actual tools. I'm letting them stew on it for now, as they do have bigger problems to handle.
Images, icons, pictures, and art on a handout really help make riddles and puzzles come alive. 

Also, look to SyFy series shows for inspiration.  I recently saw some great "dungeon" puzzles in both Stargate SG1 and Sanctuary. 

The Stargate one simply used a language the characters couldn't understand, with a "letter" or image each on a tile.  They had to be arranged 1-9 and turns out each image, letter, symbol or heiroglyphic was actually simply mirro images of each number back to back.  so like 3E, something like that, if it was two 3's.  Simple, fun, easy - and they had to figure it out while the ceiling was caving in in a room with a sealed exit as soon as they walked in.  Avalon, Part I or II I believe was the episode.

One final tip: like those series, there should be some tie to the story or adventure that provides clues to solving it.  It should fit, at least somewhat, instead of being a random puzzle in the middle of nowhere.  You know, context - and there was some in those two episodes at least, but not so much context it was overwhelming (i.e. you didn't have to be a genius or have 10 pages of notes/history/lore on-hand to figure it out).

LEONINE ROAR : Amp Up Your D&D Game : Visit my D&D blog :: FASTER COMBAT : Crush Your Combat Grind

Sadly, puzzles don't tend to translate well to tabletops . . . if only because they are the second most possible means of grinding a game to a dead halt as the players figure out the answer. Players, not characters, mind you....



That is, I think, the main danger of a poorly-designed puzzle: forcing a player to solve an in-game puzzle can make only a little more sense than throwing a pencil at Stewart the Player from across the game table to see if he survives the attack, to find out if his Halfling Rogue character can dodge an assassin's thrown dagger!  (Wait till Stewart finds out how his Evil DM deals with the Fortitude check to see if his character survives the DM's poisoned penc-- er, I mean, assassin's poisoned dagger )


Anyway, it sounds like some great ideas in this thread
[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
The Cult of the Thread Necromancers commands this thread to RISE, and walk again amongst the living!


Links that may be of interest in relation to this topic:


  • The Three-Clue Rule - an examination of how to avoid mysteries grinding to an uncomfortable halt for lack of sufficient clues

  • Clear Goals - Centauri starts a discussion of the importance of setting clear and well-defined goals for players

  • Murder Mystery - a request for help with game where a PC begins investigating a murder mystery

[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
I've tried to incorporate puzzles into my adventures - they're often clunky, but my players love them. My favorite so far required my players to simulate the rising and setting of the sun. A short riddle hinted that they must take on the duty of the Sun God, and the room consisted of two large braziers, a pool of water, and a rotating dial with symbols representing different times of the day. As they rotated the dial, they had to light the first brazier at dawn, then the one for midday, then the one for dusk, then extinguish all three to complete the cycle. It was relatively simple - a little difficult to act out, but simple enough.
community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/758...(DMs_especially)?pg=1

Here you go
community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/758...(DMs_especially)?pg=1

Here you go

I have used some puzzles and riddles from the D&D computer games (Neverwinter Nights etc). They are good, but be sure that your players haven't played the games! Then they might remember the puzzles!

My experience as a DM, is that puzzles should not be the only way to get further into the dungeon!
I often use them, to let PC get ekstra treasure! Smile  
Here is a puzzle that you might like, when the characters go through a dungeon have their be writing on the wall of this story:

A Knight's indecision, a warrior's desperation walked the path ahead of him and turned left to bury his aberration. Lay in the shadows, croutched in the dark the dead Bishop rose with a spark and was carried North East two miles far. Found by the helper, put to rest by the pawn the men's work only takes them so far. Hollow is the castle, ruined is the rook fall did the tower and three more people it took anger of the gods for the ones that were dead. A Queen in olny title, her majesty she was not when it came to the mistress she is only one step up. A King of cold ambition, royal man indeed when it came to the bishop, he choose the black throne for his deeds. Tainted is the Knight, Dead is the Bishop, Worn is the Pawn, Collapsed is the Rook, Worthless is the Queen, Loathing is the King and Enlightened is the Traveler.
 
Have the PCs write this down for latter in the Dungeon they will encounter a room that looks like a chess board. They will have to decipher the tale in order to know which spaces to traverse  the picture will show you the path they would have to take. It is a short puzzle so don't expect much more than ten or so minutes for the players to try and solve it. When they solve it the floor peice they are on will rise up to the next part of the dungeon or to a treasure room if you feel that it should be.






i recently did a puzzle for my D&D group and it took them a little time to figure out. They are traveling down into a dungeon built by four Archmages, 3 of which the PC's met at one point. On the second level of the dungeon the PC's saw four statues positioned in four different small rooms. If they were paying attention they would see that each of the statues was pointing in a different direction (North, South, East, West) a little ways further through the second level they come to a large room with a copy of each of the statues standing in four corners of the room and a large pedastal in the center. The objetive is to move each of the statues into positon on the pedestal to match the statues in the four previous rooms. Doing so opens the door at the end of the room granting them excess to the third floor.

One other puzzle I did in the same dungeon. They found 4 runes in four seperate rooms and had to use history to figure out what language the runes where in (obviously made sure at least one of the PC's knew that language)  each rune was one letter: O,N,E,P  then when they got into a main room they saw four turn dial mechanisms on the wall each will all four of the Runes inside and had to turn the dials to spell out the word they thought the Runes meant. The word was OPEN which they figured out pretty quickly.
Hello all, I'm completely new to the forums but I seen this and just wanted to throw in my 2 cents Laughing

I ran a puzzle dungeon in my last campaign that turned out fairly well once my 2 pcs figured out the feel of it. I got the inspiration of it when I saw Jim Carrey's version of the Grench who stole Christmas. There's a scene that het gets onto a swing and flies up into further parts of his cave home. 

The group was traveling through a mountain/woods area when they seen an entrance, heading inside they see 4 swings in a circle all facing towards the center. In the center was a pedistool with a chiseled area in the middle that made it quite evident that a statue belonged there. Under the statue was a stone floor, upon further inspection (and a decent search/spot) they seen that the floor had a small crease in a circle around the pedistool. The rest of the room was made of stone, the walls have roots that were starting to break through and the surface was slimmy so that spiderclimb wouldn't work. Looking up all they could see was a dense fog.  After tugging on the swings, one decided to sit down (1st trigger), the other decided to do the same thing (2nd trigger). As soon as the 2nd one sat down the 1st ones swing flung into action and was taken to a ledge, after swinging himself onto the ledge he was taken to a door and had to answer a simple riddle. I made it to where it would be something stupid that they would have on them (what has a head, a tail and no body- a coin) placing the coin into the slot he was able to go into the room where there was a dragon statue.
I also had a diagram for myself so I knew which swing led to which floor. 4 floors, 4 swings, 4 statues.   The last room has a statue and a weird stone ball with a button in the middle. Picking it up it weighs about 5 pounds, but to press the button the players hand would immediately fall to the ground and stuck until he presses the button again. 
After the characters got back to the ground floor, they just had to look at the bases of the statues to figure out where the 1st one belonged. (BTW, the statues were of a wolf, a dragon, a cat and an eagle) Once the statue was placed the floor gives out and they both dropped.... and dropped... and dropped... (My smart-butted husband played the SpyKids bit of "How long have we been falling? I dunno, my watch doesn't tell time- just to give you an idea of how long they were dropping) FINALLY one decides maybe to bring out the ball and push the button, the ball drops into a sloping disk at the bottom and a button is triggered and finally after a somewhat padded landing they hit bottom. 
The room is huge (big enough for a dragon to live comfortable) and is in the shape of a triangle. There are rocks and broken pillars everywhere, as well as scorch marks and old blood stains and bones. In each corner is a pedistool to place a statue in (once again, indentation from the shapes of the bases) Once all are in, they hear a booming voice "Choose your opponent", after much debate and fear of fighting a dragon, they choose the cat. The cat turned out to be a chimera, after that fight they went with the Eagle which ended up to be a Gripphon.After defeating the gripphon,   they finally choose the dragon, which happens to be a friendly, wise dragon. No fight, they are granted 1 wish and after choosing are teleported out as the whole mountainside caves in.   

They really enjoyed that one, I'll post another one later when I get the time 
Okay, not all of these are mine but I found some good ones.

-Karma room, where anything you do also happens to you. Hit someone on the head, and suddenly that player's head hurts too. Kill someone and you also die, do what you will with the idea

-Quicksand trap

-Stairs that are nothing special but have to be climbed to move on and in the crossfire of archers

-Make challenges timed

-I got tricked with this one, mention that characters are in a hallway that is relatively squared, have a few other things happen then something triggers a boulder rolling towards the PCs and all exits are suddenly blocked. They have to duck in the corner between the round boulder and the corner of where the wall meets the floor. Exit ahead is now open.

-Strange mirror that looks promising, but actually holds the party's Dopplegangers they have to defeat- if you want to make it extra hard, give them the exact same specs and spells and have them think like the players too.

- Labrynths are always interesting, just don't forget to give them string. For an extra twist, make it alive and the passages constantly switching. If you're having a bad day, make a rat eat the string.

- Statues that come to life, whether they be guardians on the walls or a chess game

- A potion puzzle like the one in Harry Potter where you have to remember things and where they went, could always demonstrate with real things for this one

- Give the character a temporary curse they have to get rid of quickly

- Give them a permanent curse they have to think to work around

- Have a sphynx or statue give a riddle, this one is a bit overused but is still quite clever "What walks on four legs, then on two, then on three?" A human, crawling then walking then with a cane


Hope you have fun with the puzzles  
I ran this last night. The players had a blast. I have some thoughts to make this work for your game and avoid pitfalls I ran into:

Appropriateness:


  • I think this works best with analytical players: My group had two programmers, a musician/tech support, a computer artist and a chemist.

  • Be lenient with metagaming. Too much RP immersion might ruin the mood and timing.


Preparation:



  • This is based on a software programmer's exercise called the Eight Queens Puzzle.

  • The purpose is to put 8 queens in a chessboard so that none of them attacks each other.

  • Get a chessboard (battlemat works fine, too), some tokens, and a 1-minute timer (hourglass for extra fun!)



Setup:



  • Characters somehow end up in an 8x8 square trap room. When they finish entering the room, an appropriate number of tokens appear to make the total number of tokens + players = 8. Put them in ramdom locations.

  • The tokens (I used them to represent 10 ft tall pillars) start to glow and flash at faster rates. Eventually each pillar pulses energy out in the directions of a queen (straight and diagonals). The first time this happens no one gets hurt (to give the players warning) but the rays pass through targets (PCs and tokens) as they hit them, hitting those behind them too.

  • Let the players use their skills to figure out things. If a player passes an athletics check, they can move tokens for the rest of the encounter. Arcana check shows tokens emitting force magic. Perception will show that the players are starting to glow themselves.

  • After a small while, the tokens and players pulse, d6 force damage to anyone in a tokens/players attack direction (Save to avoid)


The puzzle:



  • Take out the timer and tell the players the tokens and themselves will pulse again in exactly 1 minute (real time) and start the timer. Pause the timer if they have to roll skill checks.

  • Every minute, figure out who gets hit, and roll damage and saves. Restart the timer.


The solution:



  • There are multiple solutions. Players have to find one of them.

  • Let the players figure out what they need to achieve.

  • Throw some hints if they are way off, so that they know the objective is for the trap not to attack anyone.

  • A good hint would be to ensure there's only one queen per row, and one queen per column.


Feedback from my session:



  • I used my watch to keep time. Calling the time left out loud at 30, 15, 5,4,3,2,1 kept things really exciting!

  • One of the PCs jumped onto one of my pillars. Eventually I made the pulses cover the whole distance up to the ceiling to prevent a boring stalemate, but better to do that by design than ad hoc.

  • Keep things fast and exciting. Pause the timer only when necessary. Do not do actual "attacks", just pass/fail saving throws. Use the same damage per attack

  • Increase the damage as the puzzle goes along. After a while, only 0-2 PCs will get caught in the crossfire, decreasing the sense of urgency.


Improvements:



  • Use a skill challenge for the PCs to disable the tokens from doing damage.

  • You might just as well call off STR checks/movement rates after a while when the players start moving things around recklessly

  • If you think the challenge might be too difficult, put actual queen chess pieces in the chessboard to give players a head start.


A couple D&D Encounters spoilers are inherent in my question (behind the spoiler link), but I'd love your input.  
Show
Running D&D Encounters tonight, and this week's session features (for the first time ever, I believe) a completely non-combat encounter. The "Tests of Lolth" feature eight rooms, each of which lead to a skill challenge/puzzle room. The trouble is that there are eight rooms (for a spider's 8 legs), but only 4 challenges. A few of the challenges are single-solution, so once one PC figures it out, anyone else at the table who gets that challenge (it's a random 1-in-4 chance) will easily know the answer, which will remove the fun for this week's session. I've started trying to come up with additional challenges, though they each need to be themed after some aspect of Lolth, the Spider Queen. If they succeed, they go to the next area. If they fail enough, they take some kind of damage and are teleported to cages in the next area. So far, the published adventure has tests of: - Shadow - Deceit - Spiders - Demons The spider one involves using a net/web... but I'm thinking maybe there are other spidery aspects I could make into separate challenges. So far, I've got a Test of Viciousness, where (like newborn spiderlings) the PC is stuck in a tight room with many blind, naked creatures (probably duplicates of the PC). The PC has to kill his "siblings", which may be a problem for paladins who hate killing innocents, or take crushing damage before teleporting to a cage.


Any other ideas would be appreciated, as I'd hate to repeat challenges.  Keep in mind that this is organized play, and I've got 2 hours for the whole thing.  Also, since everyone's level 2, instant-kill & huge damage effects are not really an option.  Any ideas would be appreciated.


Check out my listing of all the 5E Druid wild-shape forms (well, all the publicly available ones, that is)

Also, read my thoughts on Acts Of Geek and listen to me on the D&D Round Table  

Experience my Level 20 Druid's (mis)adventures in the livestreamed Tarrasque Takedown

Oh, and come play Encounters with me Wednesday nights or Expeditions on Monday nights in western Massachusetts at Modern Myths

Illiandry, rather than put your comment in a thread about puzzles, could you make your own?  People often wont read 3 pages of a thread before posting, and yours will be lost.

That way I can make counters too.
Illiandry, rather than put your comment in a thread about puzzles, could you make your own?  People often wont read 3 pages of a thread before posting, and yours will be lost.

That way I can make counters too.

Advice taken!  Thank you Mastercliff!
FYI, the additional puzzle challenges I used for my D&D Encounters question above are as follows:

Test of Viciousness: "Weakness is devoured by strength." as I listed above, and it worked beautifully with the PC who encountered it, since her drow character had family abandonment issues.

Test of Capriciousness: "Pawns overestimate their value." Player saw a map with forces arrayed on it in a tactical setup (just like any of the tactical army combat video games I'm sure we've all played).  He had to maneuver smaller forces to defend against attacking demon hordes (with History checks and general tactical planning), but the only way to "win" was to use long-range attackers to attack a melee that included your own men, representing Llolth's willingness to sacrifice her own forces when it serves her greater goals.

Test of Poison: "What doesn't kill you may still weaken you horribly."  Player had to get past 3 platforms, each with a fanged, poisonous tentacle rod at the center of each platform.  Any number of Skill checks could be used, but the rods learned as he went, so the same check could not be used twice.  Failure pushed him back one platform and did poison damage.

Trickery: "Fools rush to certain death."  A series of monsters (drider, demon, huge spider) were arrayed to fight, and the PC had to choose which one to take on.  They were all illusions, of course, evidenced by the psychic damage that they did.  Nobody chose this one, though, so I didn't get to see how it played out with a real player.

Check out my listing of all the 5E Druid wild-shape forms (well, all the publicly available ones, that is)

Also, read my thoughts on Acts Of Geek and listen to me on the D&D Round Table  

Experience my Level 20 Druid's (mis)adventures in the livestreamed Tarrasque Takedown

Oh, and come play Encounters with me Wednesday nights or Expeditions on Monday nights in western Massachusetts at Modern Myths

Here's a pretty simple ciphered message that I used to seal a door in a dungeon. The message is in English, but each letter is replaced by a corresponding Efreeti rune. To keep things from dragging on too long, I made sure that at least some of the letters appeared superficially similar to their English counterpart. The party could also potentially complete an optional combat encounter that would decipher one or two of the letters. Before I used it in my campaign, I showed it to a friend, who was able to solve it in a reasonable amount of time (10-15 minutes).
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"It all depends on me, you see." The first line of The Trial of Cyric the Mad.

These are some I might use, Having locked doors(super hard checks to open + damage if failed) where they are givin a riddle and the answer is where the key is hidden or that the element on the lock opens the door  :


Q: The person who makes it, sells it. The person who buys it never uses it and the person who uses it doesn't know they are. What is it


A: A coffin

--- "The key lies in the answer"


Q: I am always hungry,
I must always be fed,
The finger I touch,
Will soon turn red


A: Fire (fire damage to retrive or mage hand)


--


Q: When young, I am sweet in the sun.
When middle-aged, I make you gay.
When old, I am valued more than ever.


A: Wine ( a barrel or bottle sitting on a table )


-- 


Q: Three lives have I.
Gentle enough to soothe the skin,
Light enough to caress the sky,
Hard enough to crack rocks.


A: Water

First, here's a few great medieval riddles: http://www.godecookery.com/mtales/mtales04.htm

And here is a puzzle/dungeon room from my current Homebrew Campaign. This puzzle is the work of tricksy fey.

Beyond Measure

The party enters a room with yellow sandstone walls and several oaken tables. These tables are scattered with gold pieces, gems, and a few more unique treasures. Tapestries are hung all along the walls. Many are plainly colored or patterned, but several depict scenes. There are seven tapestries that depict scenes and seven unique treasures. The tapestries are all brightly colored and expertly woven. The treasures are all delicately made.

The door the party entered through disappears behind them, hidden by an illusion. Glowing letters then appear in the air, giving the clue to the puzzle:
Seven tapestries, seven treasures: but only two are beyond measure. Choose two and light the way; choose wrong and suffer pain.

The scenes on each tapestry vary. They are as follows.
1. Several bards playing instruments.
2. A dragon's horde.
3. The sun and the moon.
4. Courtiers dancing in a ballroom.
5. A wedding.
6. A poet reciting from a scroll.
7. A map of the kingdom the party is currently in.

An appraiser who examines each tapestry might note that the bard tapestry is the most expertly woven, but the sun and moon tapestry is most vibrant. The most worthless is the poet's tapestry, which is somewhat ragged. But these clues are red herrings. Gold, the cosmos, and the kingdom can all be measured; music and poems both have measures. The real answer is the wedding tapestry, which depicts love. This is beyond measure.

If any character touches the wrong tapestry, it tries to strangle them. There is otherwise no penalty for repeated guessing. When they choose the wedding tapestry, an archway appears behind it, but it cannot be opened.

The seven treasures are placed on various tables. They are as follows.
1. Golden scales.
2. A silver and ruby chalice.
3. Ancient wine in a crystal bottle.
4. A rosewood castle in minute detail.
5. An onyx horse.
6. Heart-shaped rose quartz.
7. A bronze dagger.

An appraiser again would note that the gold scales and the silver and ruby chalice are worth the most. The bronze dagger is worth the least. But this is again a red herring. The real answer is the  heart-shaped rose quartz.

If any character touches an incorrect treasure, it becomes red hot and burns their hand severely. There is otherwise no penalty for repeated guessing. When they bring the heart-shaped rose quartz to the archway behind the wedding tapestry, the stone dissolves away and a doorway appears, leading onward.

So I wrote a riddle a little while back, it unlocked a hidden door leading to a side encounter and some loot. 

I was never sure how good it was because most of the players couldn't solve it to save their lives, however my drunken buddy spouted out the answer before the players could finish reading him the riddle (I gave it to them scribed on a piece of paper, so they could read it repeatedly, and so I wouldn't have to repeat myself constantly). 

I've always wondered what other people would think of it:
 


I am a door that opens on command 


though none quite make the right demand
 


it's just that im quite shy you see


i'll need to know who you might be



so say the word and ill swing free


its so easy, dont you see?




SOLUTION: the player speaks the words "open sesame"


total cliché, I know. 

a simple puzzle I have used in the past involves 4 statues. Each statue is linked to a element fire, water, earth, and air. The way is opened when each statue is exposed to its element.

example

adventure holding a torch- fire

farmer holding a shovel- earth

woman holding a fan- air

woman holding a bowl- water

strange911 wrote:

a simple puzzle I have used in the past involves 4 statues. Each statue is linked to a element fire, water, earth, and air. The way is opened when each statue is exposed to its element.

example

adventure holding a torch- fire

farmer holding a shovel- earth

woman holding a fan- air

woman holding a bowl- water

 Very "The Fifth Element."

 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/19.jpg)

Are you really "entitled to your opinion"?
RedSiegfried wrote:
The cool thing is, you don't even NEED a reason to say yes.  Just stop looking for a reason to say no.
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