03/11/2010 LD: "Confessions in an Armory"

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This thread is for discussion of this week's Latest Developments, which goes live Friday morning on magicthegathering.com.
I'm pleased for having an insightful and objective analysis about Equipment and I agree in both points: equipment can have a counterproductive effect on the game if left unchecked but Living Weapons, while risky, are quite OK.

I hate to admit it but I do dislike equipment too. As the one who plays it, it still needs another creature to equip, and once it is in play upgrading any creature you cast is an obligatory procedure without having to think about it; as the opponent, I hate being occasionally owned by a Sword or a Loxodon Warhammer that just wins the game by itself (making the creature wielding it irrelevant, just as it was mentioned there), and even if I had the naturalize for it (something that I don't like to put on the SB) then the blowout for my opponents makes it too easy. I'm probably biased because I have played against a bunch of novice players whose only good card in their deck is the rare equipment but yeah, equipment for me is "win big or lose big" without any gray area where the fun is.

As for Standard, I can't hide my disappointment especially because the set was full of constructed promising card, but as tournaments show Standard has degenerated in a reign of Caw - go where 6 top slots and mirror matchups in the finals are the rule rather than the exception. It is interesting to note that the Swords have generated that exact scenario of creature stats being irrelevant and Squadron hawk being the best card solely for being 4 equippable bodies on a single card. Thus, I have to choose "bad" when I was really looking forward to choosing "good" this time.
If Limited gets in the way of printing good Constructed cards... Screw limited
I like this article a lot, especially because it confronts something every cube designer knows---equipment is super-powerful. Watching Umezawa's Jitte in action is terrifying. In my lower-power cube, I barely have any equipment anymore for balance; I recently cut Trusty Machete.

As a twice-weekly drafter, I'm glad Development feels this fear. I dislike the Limited effect of strong cards like Viridian Claw, let alone complete bombs like Loxodon Warhammer. Actually, my favorite equipment to play this block is Flayer Husk. I had a great experience in a close draft match where I won by carefully managing the Husk to make profitable attacks and move it back to the right blocker.

My poll answer was "no opinion" because that best approximated "I don't play Standard".
This was an awesome, concise article about equipment and I thought it was great.
I found this article tragically short and uninteresting.  And no, you don't "not care" what creatures you have when you have equipment.  Quite the opposite - most equipment is very particular about the creatures that can use it best.  In most cases, two creatures will do more heavy lifting than one creature and one equipment; four creatures and one equipment might be better than five creatures, but overall more creatures tend to be better than more than a very small amount of equipment.
My New Phyrexia Writing Credits My M12 Writing Credits
As far as the benefit of the rest of Magic is concerned, gold cards in Legends were executed perfectly. They got all the excitement a designer could hope out of a splashy new mechanic without using up any of the valuable design space. Truly amazing. --Aaron Forsythe's Random Card Comment on Kei Takahashi
The equipment would be perfectly okay and safe in an old environment when MAGIC was not about creature combat mostly. In the modern environment, where it's mostly all about winning with creatures equipment is a very powerful tool.
I really don't like the modern face of magic: I really enjoyed stack interactions more than creature combat, creatures are more interesting for their abilities, rather than figures in bottom right corner, and my opinion is that equipments mostly should give the creatures new abilities, rather than pumping the body. Although not a good card outside limited, Heavy Arbalest is a nice example of such equipment. Swords wouldn't be THAT strong without this +2/+2, even if they had a better trigger on them.
As much as I do agree about the current state of Magic design I did like the article about how to develop in such an environment. I don't care one way or the other for the ablity, but this was a refreshing change from "we found players didn;t understand this" or "players thought this was unfun."
I liked this article.  It did a nice job discussing equipment.  I have always had trouble with equipment because it remains on the board when a creature dies and can be equipped on the next creature that comes out, making and endless cycle of threats.
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The equipment would be perfectly okay and safe in an old environment when MAGIC was not about creature combat mostly. In the modern environment, where it's mostly all about winning with creatures equipment is a very powerful tool.



That's a really good point.  In the original Mirrodin block, Equipment was strong because it helped make up for your relatively bad creatures.  Now that creatures are better, Equipment can be a bit overpowering.
This was a good article. I assume you mostly talk about limited w/r/t living weapon and equipment in general. In constructed I control what creatures are equipped so if I want +2/+2 on a flier, I just put a sword on a hawk. There are more efficient ways to give a fatty flying too.

I really liked seeing your logic behind making cards that, as you stated, appear rather pointless. I think you were stating these cards are costed the way they are for limited, and if so, do you just not care no one will want them for constructed? Limited is nice and all, but a year from now cards get played because people want them in their decks. Balanced for limited means never played again after the draft. It also means any copy opened not for a draft is useless.
Spot on Tom, glad it's on the site.  I've really enjoyed Neo-Mirrodin limited and seeing you write about the same concerns I have is gratifying.  I've had to hand out the exact same argument several times during draft to players debating to play Strandwalker and Skinwing.
The equipment would be perfectly okay and safe in an old environment when MAGIC was not about creature combat mostly. In the modern environment, where it's mostly all about winning with creatures equipment is a very powerful tool.



That's a really good point.  In the original Mirrodin block, Equipment was strong because it helped make up for your relatively bad creatures.  Now that creatures are better, Equipment can be a bit overpowering.



Actually, I think his point was "I want cheaper counterspells!"
"We will all be purified in Wurm. What is good will be used to heal Wurm, or grow Wurm, or to fuel Wurm's path. What is vile will be extruded, and we will be free of it forever." --Prophet of the Cult of Wurm
It's not just about the loss of counterspells in this day and age of Monster Mash. Countermagic actually seems okay right now anyway.
It's not just about the loss of counterspells in this day and age of Monster Mash. Countermagic actually seems okay right now anyway.


That's because people have finally figured out how powerful cheap, conditional counters are. It took gutting Counterspell but I think it's been worth it.
Enjoyed the article, don't enjoy Standard too much right now, although that's not Mirrodin Beseiged's fault.  I don't see Jace's dominance (or $100 pricetag) going away anytime soon, metalcraft will basically never see the light of day in Constructed, infect is way too slow to compete (and while I think there's a possibility that it becomes viable post-New Phyrexia, and an even greater chance that it's dominant post-rotation, that's a while from now, and I don't really like the archetype that much anyway).

Seriously, something just seems wrong with the format when an archetype that has the opponent start at effectively 10 life, whose creatures even apart from that are almost strictly better than those that were playable during the previous Mirrodin block (Viridian Shaman + wither = Viridian Corrupter, e.g.), are too slow/not good enough to see play now.  Power creep much, Wizards?
"When Mirrodin Besieged was being released, many players commented derisively about the poor-looking numbers on Strandwalker and Skinwing. Their equip costs are 4 Manaand 6 Mana, respectively, which are quite large compared to traditional Equipment."

This was a very good call, though. Both of those cards are extremely strong in Limited even with the high equip costs. A couple of mana cheaper to equip and they'd cross the line between strong and annoying!
Seriously, something just seems wrong with the format when an archetype that has the opponent start at effectively 10 life, whose creatures even apart from that are almost strictly better than those that were playable during the previous Mirrodin block (Viridian Shaman + wither = Viridian Corrupter, e.g.), are too slow/not good enough to see play now.  Power creep much, Wizards?

That's not quite a fair comparison.  The reason that Viridian Shaman was good during the original Mirrodin block wasn't because of its power level per se, it was because anything that could kill artifacts was at a premium.  Let's be glad that artifacts aren't quite as strong right now as they were then!
Thanks to everyone who helped with the design of the plane of Golamo in the Great Designer Search 2!
My Decks
These are the decks I have assembled at the moment:
Tournament Decks (4)
Kicker Aggro (Invasion Block) Sunforger/Izzet Guildmage Midrange (Ravnica/Time Spiral/Xth Standard) Dragonstorm Combo (Time Spiral/Lorwyn/Xth Standard) Bant Midrange (Lorwyn/Shards/M10 Standard)
Casual Multiplayer Decks (50)
Angel Resurrection Casual Soul Sisters Sindbad's Adventures with Djinn of Wishes Sphinx-Bone Wand Buyback Morph (No Instants or Sorceries) Cabal Coffers Control Zombie Aggro Hungry, Hungry Greater Gargadon/War Elemental Flashfires/Boil/Ruination - Boom! Call of the Wild Teysa, Orzhov Scion with Twilight Drover, Sun Titan, and Hivestone Slivers Rebels Cairn Wanderer Knights Only Gold and () Spells Captain Sisay Toolbox Spellweaver Helix Combo Merfolk Wizards Izzet Guildmage/The Unspeakable Arcane Combo Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind and his Wizards Creatureless Wild Research/Reins of Power Madness Creatureless Pyromancer Ascension Anarchist Living Death Anvil of Bogardan Madness Shamen with Goblin Game/Wound Reflection Combo Mass damage Quest for Pure Flame Valakut, the Molten Pinnacle/Clear the Land with 40+ Lands Doubling Season Thallids Juniper Order Ranger Graft/Tokens Elf Archer Druids Equilibrium/Aluren Combo Experiment Kraj Combo Reap Combo False Cure/Kavu Predator Combo Savra, Queen of the Golgari Sacrifice/Dredge Elf Warriors Eight-Post Sneak Attack Where Ancients Tread Zur the Enchanter with Opal creatures Tamanoa/Kavu Predator/Collapsing Borders Esper Aggro Mishra, Artificer Prodigy and his Darksteel Reactor Theft and Control Unearth Aggro Soul's Fire Vampires Devour Tokens Phytohydra with Powerstone Minefield Treefolk Friendly? Questing Phelddagrif Slivers Dragon Arch Fun I'm probably forgetting a few...
It's not just about the loss of counterspells in this day and age of Monster Mash. Countermagic actually seems okay right now anyway.


That's because people have finally figured out how powerful cheap, conditional counters are. It took gutting Counterspell but I think it's been worth it.



Actually it's because there are the right amount of them. We've had several solid control environments since Counterspell left Standard long ago. In this case there are enough playable counters in a format that also has Jace.

Seriously, something just seems wrong with the format when an archetype that has the opponent start at effectively 10 life, whose creatures even apart from that are almost strictly better than those that were playable during the previous Mirrodin block (Viridian Shaman + wither = Viridian Corrupter, e.g.), are too slow/not good enough to see play now.  Power creep much, Wizards?



Except if you took a mirrodin block constructed Affinity deck and put it up against any current standard deck, the affinity deck would curb stomp it. The overall power level of what they are printing now is not any higher than it used to be. Large creatures are much more powerful than they used to be, but stuff like land destruction, countermagic, and instant speed card draw is weaker. Dominant archetypes of the past like Affinity, Psychatog, Replenish, Nightmare Survival were all much more overpowering and unfair than modern decks like Fairies, Jund, Valakut, and Cawblade.
Except if you took a mirrodin block constructed Affinity deck and put it up against any current standard deck, the affinity deck would curb stomp it. The overall power level of what they are printing now is not any higher than it used to be. Large creatures are much more powerful than they used to be, but stuff like land destruction, countermagic, and instant speed card draw is weaker. Dominant archetypes of the past like Affinity, Psychatog, Replenish, Nightmare Survival were all much more overpowering and unfair than modern decks like Fairies, Jund, Valakut, and Cawblade.


Most of this is true, but there's one very important metric and another that correlates with it that you're leaving out that I don't think has changed significantly from Mirrodin or Urza or maybe even the heyday of Necro Black to now, which are:

1) the discrepancy in power level between the top one, two, maybe three decks and the rest of the environment, and

2) the number of archetypes that are competitive at one time.

These, to me, are the key measures of how well Wizards is regulating the "power level" of the game (nebulous as that term is). I don't think they're doing a much better or worse job than they have been in a long time.
It's not just about the loss of counterspells in this day and age of Monster Mash. Countermagic actually seems okay right now anyway.



I really don't see what else it could be about for this segment of the player base.  The post I referred to, in particular, references "stack interactions".  To the best of my knowledge, counterspells are the most common way in which spells on the stack are interacted with.

The simple fact of the matter is that a heavy emphasis on creature combat is good for the game.  There is way more design space on a creature than on any other type of spell.  Not only are creatures a good source of repeatable effects, they also serve as anchors for auras and targets for removal in every color.  Additionally, power and toughness provide more numbers that can be adjusted for balance. 

There is also the fact that creatures are generally just the most efficient win condition, as a one-time investment provides a repeating threat.  They also give players things to do during turns where the luck of the draw prevents other options.  Without creatures, games of Magic would basically degenerate into two players staring at each other doing nothing for most of the game. 
"We will all be purified in Wurm. What is good will be used to heal Wurm, or grow Wurm, or to fuel Wurm's path. What is vile will be extruded, and we will be free of it forever." --Prophet of the Cult of Wurm
You're free to enjoy the emphasis of the red zone at the expense of other elements of course. For that matter Aaron Forsythe agrees with you, as his vision for the face of Magic play consists of an angel fighting a vampire. As for me most (but not all) of my actual win conditions are creatures. How I arrive there is different depending on the deck I play. Which wouldn't be true if I was playing Standard right now.

There are far more stack interactions than just counterwars. In Time Spiral alone there were about a million ways a simple upkeep could go, whether players were using blue or not. That's pretty much gone as a side-effect of intentionally simplifying design (and yes they are doing this; not only is it obvious in the sets but it was a stated goal of R&D). Even control players get to hide behind planeswalkers who either win the game for them outright or hold things down until they can play that one mythic creature that will. If Dralnu had access to JTMS it would be far beyond disgusting, as opposed to being really annoying. And that really is saying something as Teferi, in my opinion, should never have made it through development as the interaction-killer that it was.

Now interactivity isn't suffering nearly as much as it was a year ago when decks like Jund could just play the best cards in the format and tap out every turn pratically unopposed. But it's not at a place that I enjoy. Which is one reason they aren't getting my money at the moment. And I defintely don't agree that there is more design space in creatures than another card type, as each set pretty much provides the same ones over and over, with block mechanics tacked on and power changes mainly at the rare and mythic levels. In fact the increased power level of creatures over the years is suggests that there may be less design space on them than some other spell types.

Now I can respect that they feel this is what is needed for a successful game if they can respect that I'll tip my hat to them and keep enjoying the older cards until they come around or I fade away. But we all need to decide how each of us feels about it. Just because an approach may or may not move more units than another approach doesn't actually make it better. If the game twists in a way someone no longer likes, the number of packs sold becomes irrelevent. Moreover, this approach leads to the concern that the casual gamer they so wish to ensnare will find the next great thing at some point. It's hardly a foolproof long-term plan.
There are far more stack interactions than just counterwars. In Time Spiral alone there were about a million ways a simple upkeep could go, whether players were using blue or not. . . .

And I defintely don't agree that there is more design space in creatures than another card type, as each set pretty much provides the same ones over and over, with block mechanics tacked on and power changes mainly at the rare and mythic levels. In fact the increased power level of creatures over the years is suggests that there may be less design space on them than some other spell types.



I would like to point out that 67% of the upkeep effects in Time Spiral were attached to creatures, which is somewhat above average.  I've estimated the overall proportion of upkeep effects attached to creatures to be closer to 47%.

As to whether or not creatures have more or less design space than other types of cards, this is clearly false, as a creature can do anything that any other card type can do, while also attacking and blocking. 
"We will all be purified in Wurm. What is good will be used to heal Wurm, or grow Wurm, or to fuel Wurm's path. What is vile will be extruded, and we will be free of it forever." --Prophet of the Cult of Wurm
There was more going on during all the triggers that did not involve summoning creatures after X turns. If that's all it was, pulling off a counter each turn and eventually casting a creature, then yeah, it's not much. But Time Spiral melted brains during the upkeep step because of what they did with Suspend and Vanishing, both on the cards themselves and the multiple enablers. What was possible then was not possible now - regardless of card type. And I have only talked about the time counter elements.

As for creatures theoretically having more design space because you can tack instants on to them, that's not entirely true. You can cycle anything and get a triggered effect for your trouble. Any permanent can be a Frankencard, including enchantments, non-creature artifacts and planeswalkers (which are by nature Frankencards). And anything can be made to attack and block as well (as Tezzeret players have learned). But even at that, sure there is some design space they are choosing not to mine, in part to avoid the Time Spiral issue.



As for creatures theoretically having more design space because you can tack instants on to them, that's not entirely true. You can cycle anything and get a triggered effect for your trouble. Any permanent can be a Frankencard, including enchantments, non-creature artifacts and planeswalkers (which are by nature Frankencards). And anything can be made to attack and block as well (as Tezzeret players have learned). But even at that, sure there is some design space they are choosing not to mine, in part to avoid the Time Spiral issue.



I'm not quite sure what you're trying to say here.  Some non-creature permanents can attack and block by becoming creatures.  That much is true.  To my mind, though, that seems to underscore the versatility of creatures, rather than undermine it.  Can you name one thing that a creature can't do that another permanent type can?
"We will all be purified in Wurm. What is good will be used to heal Wurm, or grow Wurm, or to fuel Wurm's path. What is vile will be extruded, and we will be free of it forever." --Prophet of the Cult of Wurm
Equip something Tongue out
Equip something Tongue out



Kor Outfitter.

What?  I'm just going off of what you said. 
"We will all be purified in Wurm. What is good will be used to heal Wurm, or grow Wurm, or to fuel Wurm's path. What is vile will be extruded, and we will be free of it forever." --Prophet of the Cult of Wurm
This was a good article it itself. However, It's brought to the surface a worry I've had for some time. 
The current standard, and the standard format before it, were in my opinion not very good, and part of it is the bit with creatures.
I've been playing magic for an incredibly long time, I've seen a pile of formats come and go, but I think my favorite one was Ravnica/Time Spiral. Why is that one better than what we have now? Well, look at the top tier of decks then: Dragonstorm, Dralnu/Draw Go decks, Solar Flare/Pox, Urzatron, GhaziGlare, Dredge, and one or two others. That's about as many viable decks as we have now. Now look at the second tier. Over 30 different decks, each with their own strategies, each needing sideboarding. The metagame was the most diverse in years, possibly ever. It wasn't all just creature combat, though that element was there: There was Aggro, with creatures, or burn, or disruption. There was control, both draw-go and tap-out. There were combo decks with Graveyard stuff and Storm, midrange/tempo (a concept that has practically died out now), ramp decks with Urzatron.
The equivalent now would look like this: Same top tier, though CawBlade is a bit weaker. You have Kuldotha, Vampires, and Boros for Aggro, Valakut Ramp, and CawBlade and UB control for control. But on the second tier, you have monoblack decks with Nantuko Shade, ally aggro decks, Fauna Shaman decks, Vengevine decks, Pyromancer Ascension combo, Dredgevine, White weenie Quest decks, White Weenie decks with Leonin Arbiter and Honor of the Pure, crazy lifegain decks with Venser's Journal and Dark Tutelage, Lotus Cobra ramp decks, mythic style, Red-Green Beats, Reanimator decks with Iona and Stormtide Leviathan, Mass Polymorph decks, R/U and R/W destructive force decks, Infect decks in multiple colors and styles, metalcraft decks, and other decks we can't even imagine.
I think the way to measure how good a format is is with these 3 criteria:
1. The difference in power between tiers.
2. The number of possible decks and deck types a player can run, and have a chance of winning.
3. The better the balance balance between slow control decks, fast aggro and combo decks, and medium-speed midrange decks. Usually, this means the average game ends at around turn 7 or 8, but some deviation from those numbers can happen. 
Creature dominance is hurting standard. There's very little diversity in the decks we play. We have maybe 8 decks really playable, and all are heavily creature-oriented. It was just so much more interesting when there was something new all the time. I'm all for simplifying the game a bit, but not the the point that only a few numbers on the bottom right of each card matter. If I'm supposed to be a Planeswalker with the knowledge of a thousand worlds on my side, Why is the best thing I can summon a bunch of birds and a white girl with a sword fetish?
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As for creatures theoretically having more design space because you can tack instants on to them, that's not entirely true. You can cycle anything and get a triggered effect for your trouble. Any permanent can be a Frankencard, including enchantments, non-creature artifacts and planeswalkers (which are by nature Frankencards). And anything can be made to attack and block as well (as Tezzeret players have learned). But even at that, sure there is some design space they are choosing not to mine, in part to avoid the Time Spiral issue.



I'm not quite sure what you're trying to say here.  Some non-creature permanents can attack and block by becoming creatures.  That much is true.  To my mind, though, that seems to underscore the versatility of creatures, rather than undermine it.  Can you name one thing that a creature can't do that another permanent type can?



You do have a point here. Of course creatures have appeared in every set and that literally cannot be said about other permanent types. I'd have to get into game theory to take it any further than this and I am not interested in going there. So I'll concede here. It wasn't my point anyway.

Even in the most complex of Standard formats - of which Ravnica-Time Spiral tends to be ranked very highly  - creatures have been around. The move to focus the game even more intently on the combat phase did literally nothing to open up new design space. And when they write articles like the one about all of the rejected mechanics for Zendikar in favor of what we now call landfall, it's clear that they are in the process of cutting off design space. Reinforcing creatures as the focal point at all levels of game play doesn;t actually do anything to change this.

So there is no real design gain whatsoever from this shift in focus. The change was made specifically as a business decision, not a game decision. It has the upside of potentially getting more people to play, and that's why they did what they did. Maximizing design space was not a reason and is not a side-effect.
Equip something

Kor Outfitter.

What?  I'm just going off of what you said.

I think Flamestick Courier and Everglove Courier would be better examples of creatures equipping to something.  I won't mention Gliding Licid and friends, because that resorts to using aura technology, rather than inherent creature abilities.
Thanks to everyone who helped with the design of the plane of Golamo in the Great Designer Search 2!
My Decks
These are the decks I have assembled at the moment:
Tournament Decks (4)
Kicker Aggro (Invasion Block) Sunforger/Izzet Guildmage Midrange (Ravnica/Time Spiral/Xth Standard) Dragonstorm Combo (Time Spiral/Lorwyn/Xth Standard) Bant Midrange (Lorwyn/Shards/M10 Standard)
Casual Multiplayer Decks (50)
Angel Resurrection Casual Soul Sisters Sindbad's Adventures with Djinn of Wishes Sphinx-Bone Wand Buyback Morph (No Instants or Sorceries) Cabal Coffers Control Zombie Aggro Hungry, Hungry Greater Gargadon/War Elemental Flashfires/Boil/Ruination - Boom! Call of the Wild Teysa, Orzhov Scion with Twilight Drover, Sun Titan, and Hivestone Slivers Rebels Cairn Wanderer Knights Only Gold and () Spells Captain Sisay Toolbox Spellweaver Helix Combo Merfolk Wizards Izzet Guildmage/The Unspeakable Arcane Combo Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind and his Wizards Creatureless Wild Research/Reins of Power Madness Creatureless Pyromancer Ascension Anarchist Living Death Anvil of Bogardan Madness Shamen with Goblin Game/Wound Reflection Combo Mass damage Quest for Pure Flame Valakut, the Molten Pinnacle/Clear the Land with 40+ Lands Doubling Season Thallids Juniper Order Ranger Graft/Tokens Elf Archer Druids Equilibrium/Aluren Combo Experiment Kraj Combo Reap Combo False Cure/Kavu Predator Combo Savra, Queen of the Golgari Sacrifice/Dredge Elf Warriors Eight-Post Sneak Attack Where Ancients Tread Zur the Enchanter with Opal creatures Tamanoa/Kavu Predator/Collapsing Borders Esper Aggro Mishra, Artificer Prodigy and his Darksteel Reactor Theft and Control Unearth Aggro Soul's Fire Vampires Devour Tokens Phytohydra with Powerstone Minefield Treefolk Friendly? Questing Phelddagrif Slivers Dragon Arch Fun I'm probably forgetting a few...
Equip something

Kor Outfitter.

What?  I'm just going off of what you said.

I think Flamestick Courier and Everglove Courier would be better examples of creatures equipping to something.  I won't mention Gliding Licid and friends, because that resorts to using aura technology, rather than inherent creature abilities.


I'd never actually read the current Oracle text of the licids until now. Surprisingly minimal rules text but very, very strange.
Equip something

Kor Outfitter.

What?  I'm just going off of what you said.

I think Flamestick Courier and Everglove Courier would be better examples of creatures equipping to something.  I won't mention Gliding Licid and friends, because that resorts to using aura technology, rather than inherent creature abilities.



I was actually holding onto the courier cycle for strategic deployment because they are such fantastic examples of an equipment-like ability on a creature.

It probably would have been more useful, though, to just use them in my argument right away instead of trying to be a smart ass first.   Oh well.  Thank you for bringing them up.
"We will all be purified in Wurm. What is good will be used to heal Wurm, or grow Wurm, or to fuel Wurm's path. What is vile will be extruded, and we will be free of it forever." --Prophet of the Cult of Wurm
Equip something



Kor Outfitter.

What?  I'm just going off of what you said. 



You one of those who answer "yes." when someone asks you "do you know what time it is?" Wink

Yeah the Couriers are awesome. The Licids don't count if Tezz animating an artifact doesn't count the other way =)
Was there any thought on giving equipment that gave bonesplitter-style boosts, but with "This can only equip a creature with flying"?  Similar to the equipment in kamigawa that could only equip creatures with power 3 or greater.
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