Novel Thoughts

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Has anyone read those GW novels? I read a lot and was wondering if they're worth my time picking up or if I should sick to Starwars and  the Sharpe's novels.
Your question's a bit premature -- Sooner Dead isn't out until February 1.
Gamma World Downloads: Character sheets, GM screen, adventures, monsters, house rules, cards, and more! You can usually find my posts at the Gamma World forum.
Isn't there 1 published already?
I wish!  Or I am ignorant;  ignorance can be be cured by enlightenment!
Isn't there 1 published already?

Let me Google that for you
Okay, we'll chalk that up to me being dumb! Lol! I guess I saw it on amazon and thought I saw it at a book store.
In the meantime, you can read 1983's "Light on Quests Mountain" Endless Quest book (i.e., Choose Your Own Adventure).

rpggeek.com/rpgitem/53391/light-on-quest...

I need to re-read my old copy to see if there's anything interesting in there.
Dharma - I was just thinking of that! It was my first experience with a D&D product as a kid. I didn't really know what D&D was at the time, and in fact, I never really made the connection until years after I started playing.

But take note if you get it: Gamma World was a grittier setting then, so even though the characters are suitable odd, don't expect the wacky hi-jinks of modern GW.
Encounters DM, Season 4 & Season 5 - Amorous Armadillo Game Shoppe - Oviedo, FL
I forgot about that book...I think I have it here somewhere on my shelves...

And "modern wacky hi-jinks"? I never saw it...Never thought that humanoid rabbits were so hi-larious. Must be something in the newer generation..."look! A planet of apes! HAW HAW! That's so funny!"
Must be something in the newer generation..."look! A planet of apes! HAW HAW! That's so funny!"

It was funny because the planet also had it's own version of the Statue of Liberty.

Wow, I must be dating myself here because I'm not referring to the recent planet of the apes, but the original 60's movie...The one with Charlton Heston.
Wow, I must be dating myself here because I'm not referring to the recent planet of the apes, but the original 60's movie...The one with Charlton Heston.

Ah. Yeah, the more recent musical was actually pretty darn funny.

Wow, I must be dating myself here because I'm not referring to the recent planet of the apes, but the original 60's movie...The one with Charlton Heston.



Wait, you mean people actually talk about the newer one? >.>

But take note if you get it: Gamma World was a grittier setting then, so even though the characters are suitable odd, don't expect the wacky hi-jinks of modern GW.



I"ve played an old GW module. I can't remember the name of it. Has the characters working for the Animal army and they're sent o a quest to stop a giant robot I think. Oh man! The brain's working double time here! I was about 14 when I played that.
Excalibur - Wacky doesn't mean "hi-larious." It means spontaneous and unexpected in a humorous way. If you don't consider the current edition of Gamma World to be "wacky," then, though I shed a tear for your inner child, there's no need to be a curmudgeon about it.

Chandrak - Ba-dum-ching! Nice one. :-)

Sabacc - I was referring specifically to Light on Quests Mountain, which I recall being a somewhat grim story overall. The protagonists are basically kids on the cusp of young adulthood who are each given an iron spear and told, "Here, go out in the untracked wilderness and see what those lights on the mountain are all about. If you come back, you'll win the right to be considered adults; if you don't, we'll send the next batch of young'ns out to look for your bodies."
Encounters DM, Season 4 & Season 5 - Amorous Armadillo Game Shoppe - Oviedo, FL
And that's a choose your own adventure book ChaoticGood? Mind if I call you CG?
Excalibur - Wacky doesn't mean "hi-larious." It means spontaneous and unexpected in a humorous way. If you don't consider the current edition of Gamma World to be "wacky," then, though I shed a tear for your inner child, there's no need to be a curmudgeon about it.

Chandrak - Ba-dum-ching! Nice one. :-)

Sabacc - I was referring specifically to Light on Quests Mountain, which I recall being a somewhat grim story overall. The protagonists are basically kids on the cusp of young adulthood who are each given an iron spear and told, "Here, go out in the untracked wilderness and see what those lights on the mountain are all about. If you come back, you'll win the right to be considered adults; if you don't, we'll send the next batch of young'ns out to look for your bodies."

I'm well aware what Wacky means, and yes, it is "hilarious" aka humourous, aka funny. I have never found anything funny about Gamma World. Strange/weird/odd, yes.

Humourous = Toon.

The current version of Gamma World isn't funny to me in the least.

To me, it's fun, just without the NY added. I've never found any post apoc. stuff funny. highly entertaining and interesting, yes.

AAAANY way, that Endless Quest book (there you go, Pure_Sabacc) is a pretty fun one. And Choose-Your-Own-Adventure books have zero to do with D&D. It was Endless Quest books by TSR that came from D&D (Here: www.google.com/search?source=ig&hl=en&rl...).
And that's a choose your own adventure book ChaoticGood? Mind if I call you CG?



Like Excalibur said, it's technically an "Endless Quest" book, but they were basically the same concept as "Choose Your Own Adventure." You make a choice, flip to a certain page to see what happens for what you chose. To be honest with you, it was the only Endless Quest book that I've ever seen, though I'm sure there must have been more.

And CG is fine by me. Smile
Encounters DM, Season 4 & Season 5 - Amorous Armadillo Game Shoppe - Oviedo, FL
In addition to Light on Quest Mountain, there was also Mystery of the Ancients, American Knights, and the 24-Hour War. All are endless quest books set in Gamma World.

Identical Games

D&D Published World foums at The Piazza (Dark Sun, Mystara, Spelljammer, Planescape, and more); Core Coliseum; D&D Material including my Master/Expert DM Competition entries

Just reading the product description for the GW "novel" makes me want to tear my eyeballs out. Horrid.
.., I'm well aware what Wacky means, and yes, it is "hilarious" aka humourous, aka funny. I have never found anything funny about Gamma World. Strange/weird/odd, yes.

...,.


You've never played with us, we find all kinds of things funny with Gamma World.  Thats how we view it, play it and describe it, "Gamma World is funny."
By the way, I have a copy of the Sooner Dead, the new D&D Gamma World novel, and I'll be reviewing it soon and posting a link to my review here.
Gamma World Downloads: Character sheets, GM screen, adventures, monsters, house rules, cards, and more! You can usually find my posts at the Gamma World forum.
Just reading the product description for the GW "novel" makes me want to tear my eyeballs out. Horrid.


I thought that too. Figured I'd better ask first. You never no they could be good... or at least alright.
By the way, I have a copy of the Sooner Dead, the new D&D Gamma World novel, and I'll be reviewing it soon and posting a link to my review here.


Thanks a lot Oraibi !
Behold the double post!
I just finished reading the Gamma World novel, Sooner Dead, last night. I basically consider it a middle-of-the-line novel. It didn't knock my socks off but I don't have too many complaints neither. One of the things that struck me most about the book was the story's relationship with the official Gamma World setting (after all, Gamma World is on the cover).

Whereas the new edition is pushed as "wild and wahoo" by Wizards of the Coast, Sooner Dead is actually written seriously (or at least, as seriously as you can when dealing with a buffalo man, a giant lizard, and armadillo bikers). This is fine by me since I've always used the setting seriously with the humor being injected by the players and the weird absurdity that is Gamma World. (Woah! My character was just killed by a 6-foot rabbit - after he turned my sword to rubber!)

Additionally, none of the flora and fauna appearing in the book are taken from the Gamma World setting (whether past or present editions). Oh, the various critters had a post-apoc, Gamma World feel, but no badders, hoops, grens, etc. made an appearance. I thought this was strange since I've read other D&D novels where the whole reason for a scene seemed to be to introduce creatures from the official setting - essentially to remind the reader that the novel isn't just a fantasy novel, but a D&D novel. Heck, I assumed the inclusion of setting creatures was required by the contract/editor, but apparently not in this case. It kinda makes me wonder what Gamma World background material Mel Odom was given when writing the story.

Kerry
I've got a review of the book that we just put up today, plus we're giving away a copy.  Check it out:
www.rovingbandofmisfits.com/?p=801

I echo a lot of KJordan's sentiments, and I really enjoyed the book.  I think a big part of that WAS because it didn't "remind the reader that the novel isn't just a fantasy novel, but a D&D novel" to quote, but rather took the idea behind the Gamma World setting and added to it.  KJordan, I'm curious, what do you think Hella's two origins are, in game terms?

Benoit.
Check out my blog over at Roving Band of Misfits, or follow me on Twitter
By the way, I'm wondering if everyone caught the play on words (I didn't get it right away either):

"SOONER Dead" is set in Gamma Oklahoma (where the author is from, btw) and the Sooners are the Oklahoma University's mascot.

A bit corny, I know, but still pretty clever.
Check out my blog over at Roving Band of Misfits, or follow me on Twitter
I got the "Sooner" pun. I didn't really want it though.
Gamma World Downloads: Character sheets, GM screen, adventures, monsters, house rules, cards, and more! You can usually find my posts at the Gamma World forum.
I am reading it now. it isn't a mess, as such, but it needs work. There seem to be many graphs where words are repeated, some even in the same sentence. Thus far, it doesn't feel a lot like Gamma World. Not early Gamma World or new Gamma World. It has more relation to a kind of mutant-heavy Fallout, minus the 50s set pieces and tone.

That said, it has some fairly diverting antics going for it. I'm not sure I expected much more. It's a work-for-hire piece, which is good to make money and get one's name out , but rarely rises above the tie-in product literary ghetto.

I haven't read a gaming novel in probably sixteen years, so I may have some unrealistic expectations.
I think a big part of that WAS because it didn't "remind the reader that the novel isn't just a fantasy novel, but a D&D novel" to quote, but rather took the idea behind the Gamma World setting and added to it.  KJordan, I'm curious, what do you think Hella's two origins are, in game terms?

Heh heh... I find it funny that you liked that the author didn't include too much of the setting, but then ask about Hella's origins. Not that your question/association is a bad thing; it is perfectly logical since it is a book based on a game to ask about the game rules (which is why I found the lack of "core" setting color odd).

Anyway, depending upon your interpretation, she could be a engineered human (with her nanites adding her powers) or maybe even an android or swarm (since she apparently has more abilities than she actually uses).

By the way, I read your review and agree that the d20 reference was just odd. I think I get what the author was trying to inject into the story, but it read awkward and he just didn't pull it off.

Looking to the future, I'm actually excited to see Paul Kidd will be writing the next novel, Red Sails in the Fallout. I love his sense of humor and really enjoyed his novel treatments of the old D&D modules (i.e., Queen of the Demonweb Pits, White Plume Mountain, etc.)

Kerry
Yeah, I saw Red Sails on Amazon too; comes out in July.  Expect me to read it and review it on the blog!  I haven't read anything by Paul Kidd, but I'm looking forward to it.  Maybe I'll pick up one of his D&D books so I know what to expect.  By the way, my theory about Hella is that she is an Enginnered Human/Swarm.  Though I could see Engineered Human/Android too.  I'm wondering if there will be a sequel, where she "discovers" and develops her nanite abilities.  Probably depends upon how this one sells.
Check out my blog over at Roving Band of Misfits, or follow me on Twitter
By the way, I'm wondering if everyone caught the play on words (I didn't get it right away either):

"SOONER Dead" is set in Gamma Oklahoma (where the author is from, btw) and the Sooners are the Oklahoma University's mascot.

A bit corny, I know, but still pretty clever.



Yeah, but the original Sooners were settlers who resied in Indian Territory (either legally or illegally) prior to opening of the lands for white settlement.

Note the following taken from wikipedia (not a definitive source by any stretch of the imagination but it does correlate to most material I've read and dimly recall from taking courses in Oklahoma history):


Sooners is the name given to settlers in the midwest of the United States who entered the Unassigned Lands in what is now the state of Oklahoma before President Grover Cleveland officially proclaimed them open to settlement on March 2, 1889 with the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889. The name derived from the "sooner clause" of the Act, which stated that anyone who entered and occupied the land prior to the opening time would be denied the right to claim land.[1]


Sooners were often deputy marshals, land surveyors, railroad employees, and others who were able to legally enter the territory early.[2] Some Sooners crossed into the territory illegally at night, and were originally called "moonshiners" because they entered "by the light of the moon." These Sooners would hide in ditches at night and suddenly appear to stake their claim after the land run started, hours ahead of legal settlers.[1]


The term Boomer relating to Oklahoma refers to participants in the "Boomer Movement," white settlers who believed the Unassigned Lands were public property and open to anyone for settlement, not just Indian tribes. Their reasoning came from a clause in the Homestead Act of 1862, which said that any settler could claim 160 acres (0.65 km2) of public land.[3] Some Boomers entered and were removed more than once by the United States Army.[4]


Those who actually observed the official start of the land run and began the race for free land often found choice sections of land already occupied by Sooners or, in some cases, by Boomers. Problems with Sooners continued with each successive land run; in an 1895 land run as much as half of the available land was taken by Sooners. Litigation between legitimate land-run participants and Sooners continued well into the 20th century, and eventually the United States Department of the Interior was given ultimate authority to settle the disputes.[1]


In 1908, the University of Oklahoma adopted "Sooners" as the nickname of their football team, after having first tried "Rough Riders" and "Boomers". Eventually, Oklahoma became known as "The Sooner State."


 


As for the novel itself, I interpret it as one of those alternate Earths that was affected by the Big Mistake, not the one described in the Gamma World big box.


Aside from the reference to the mountains having gotten bigger due to tectonic shifting in California, it isn't the Oklahoma I'm setting up for my Gamma World campaign. Smile




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