11/23/2010 SF: "Truthiness and Multiplayer Shenanigans"

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This thread is for discussion of this week's Serious Fun, which goes live Tuesday morning on magicthegathering.com.
Since you bring up the topic of expectations from your articles, let me say this.
What I like to read about is something that gives me an insight, something that causes me to think, something I can take away and try myself.
Discussing  your idea of what makes Magic games fun, interesting formats, building decks that are fun to play, playing decks in a way that increases fun, all those things I'm interested about.
One thing I've noticed though a lot in your articles and that cause me to skip over them are your walkthroughs of your games. Perhaps other people like this, but I'm not one of them.
For the first time in some while, Styborski has written an article which meets with my approval.  Granted, it reinforces that the "camera on the head" thing he does is intentional, which doesn't help me dislike it less, but at least he's (IMO) doing the wrong thing for the right reason.  Winning is indeed only part of the point of MTG, even in a duel but most especially in multiplayer.  If you want to dominate your table, you don't need a column named "serious fun"; the various Spike columns will teach you most of the same lessons you need, and common sense delivers the rest.

I haven't read the linked second article as yet, so I'll be eager to see what's in there.

And Styborski also has my thanks this week for finally giving me a good enough look at Argent Sphinx to confirm that it does indeed have a face.  I've been waiting since Scars released to find out.
My New Phyrexia Writing Credits My M12 Writing Credits
As far as the benefit of the rest of Magic is concerned, gold cards in Legends were executed perfectly. They got all the excitement a designer could hope out of a splashy new mechanic without using up any of the valuable design space. Truly amazing. --Aaron Forsythe's Random Card Comment on Kei Takahashi
"Its okay if you like competetive elements in casual formats! I prommise, realy. Some day they might even find a cure for you! Dont give up hope"

I get it, strategy is everywhere and cool, theemy, gimmicy magic needs a place too. I just dont get why I who love to mix the two feel like you pretend that those two are unable to coexist and that, in fact, there is something slightly wrong with me for apreciates tactics in playing, deckbuilding and reading articles.


"It isn't that strategy can't be fun, merely that it isn't always the most entertaining thing to talk about. [...] what happened is interesting for its own sake."

Thats realy your freaking opinion! I love to talk/read about tactics in a casual seting. I play decks creat situations that are intersting on thier own as well as I find humor/fun in others despite elements of synergy/competetiveness. In my world, the two coexist. If you dont want to write about it, just say so, dont make it out as if it cant be.
This article really summed up why I haven't been able to read Serious Fun in a while.  The good news is, now I feel like we're both on the same page, and I don't feel guilty about not wanting to read it.  An amicable split, in other words.
I like playing multiplayer.  That is how I learned magic, and I enjoy getting to play with several friends at once.  I also really like winning, and much more hate losing.  So am I to assume this article is an attack on me?

I felt do disappointed going from thinking there might be something could use, as multiplayer tends to value different cards, decks, and strategies than one on one to getting some ranting of why people who like to win at multiplayer are horrible and shouldn't bother playing.

Guess maybe multiplayer and any casual games everyone should start out with an indestructible shrouded platinum angel so the games go on forever and don't have to worry about the pesky losing and winning?
This article really summed up why I haven't been able to read Serious Fun in a while.  The good news is, now I feel like we're both on the same page, and I don't feel guilty about not wanting to read it.  An amicable split, in other words.



That's exactly how I feel. After the read, it's always like I wasted my time, hoping to find new ideas or stuff but there's nothing to think about.