10/27/2010 StF: "You Down with O-T-T?"

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This thread is for discussion of this week's Savor the Flavor, which goes live Wednesday morning on magicthegathering.com.
Good analogy Doug.

 
I am disappointed with the classification of Soliton in the tofu category. Doesn't anybody study physics anymore? 

Very interesting letter of the week response today.  I think calling Phyrexia a metaphor for anything in reality is stretching things a bit, but the general philosophy Doug expresses here is exactly why Ravnica is my favorite MTG world (and the one I tapped as being most deserving of a return in my GDS letter response, though that was more about the sheer untapped potential of a world defined by overpopulation and the diversity of ten guilds plus several smaller mystical organizations).  Phyrexia is a black-hat entity, very well-done but not precisely realistic; Ravnica, however, shows exactly what happens when the march of progress becomes more important than preserving human lives or ecological systems.  Murder has been legalized by the guilds, partly because a lot of them are red or black, but mostly because Ravnica is full, and in desperate need of population control.  That's a hop-skip-and-jump away from where the Chinese already are and where America soon will be if it continues to grow as it is doing.

PS - I'm extremely happy that Magic has gotten its first Dais and Censer in this set.  More versimilitude via the utilization of magical tools resembling those in real-world occultist traditions, kthxbye.

My New Phyrexia Writing Credits My M12 Writing Credits
As far as the benefit of the rest of Magic is concerned, gold cards in Legends were executed perfectly. They got all the excitement a designer could hope out of a splashy new mechanic without using up any of the valuable design space. Truly amazing. --Aaron Forsythe's Random Card Comment on Kei Takahashi
Wow, we just learned about Vulcanus in Communications (in relation to literature). I never made the connection to the Vulshok though haha.
With a BA in Classics, and going to grad school for Hellenistic Archaeology, i am alright with this
I usually like these word columns, but I learned absolutely nothing new this time. I'm too literate. :-(

I am disappointed with the classification of Soliton in the tofu category. Doesn't anybody study physics anymore? 



I thought similarly about the proposed name Monad. Doesn't anyone study category theory anymore?


Very pleased to discover "Myr" was derived from "myrmidon". After hearing a few people pronounce it ME-ER (which may be correct, but I always read it as MY-ER) I was worried it might be a sly reference to the word "mere". Because, you know, they're all little guys!
I'm not usually a fan of this column but I really enjoyed this week's article.  It is interesting to see to what extent the words have roots in real language and to what extent Wizards 'pick' names out of the air
Interesting to hear the origin of some of the words in Scars of Mirrodin.  So is Myr pronounced Mur, Meer, or what?

I don't know about Certarch, and Fulgent but I know a little about the other words.

I have seen the word Dais in places other than MTG.  I am not entirely sure what it is but I know it is a real word.

Oxidda may not be a real word, but seems to be based off oxidation.  Which is the chemical process of turning iron into rust when in contact with oxygen.  There is also an entire category of reactions in chemistry called oxidation-reduction.

Argent seems to be a shortened form of Argentum.  Argentum is both the Latin word for silver (hence silver being labeled Ag on the periodic table), and was the original name for Mirrodin.
IMAGE(http://pwp.wizards.com/1205820039/Scorecards/Landscape.png)
Interesting to hear the origin of some of the words in Scars of Mirrodin.  So is Myr pronounced Mur, Meer, or what?



I'd guess it's Mur, because Myrmidon is prononounced mur-muh-don.
I love these types of columns, and I've always loved studying words like this. While reading the explanations, I kept going "of course!". As in, once I saw them I recognized a lot of the roots but just looking at the cards in a vacuum my decrepit 30-something year old brain didn't make the connection on its own. 

Great to hear Cavotta's back, I hope it didn't take a divorce to get him back (IIRC, he left for a sunnier part of the US in part because of his family not liking the PNW).  
Proud member of C.A.R.D. - Campaign Against Rare Duals "...but the time has come when lands just need to be better. Creatures have gotten stronger, spells have always been insane, and lands just sat in this awkward place of necessity." Jacob Van Lunen on the refuge duals, 16 Sep 2009. "While it made thematic sense to separate enemy and allied color fixing in the past, we have come around to the definite conclusion that it is just plain incorrect from a game-play perspective. This is one of these situations where game play should just trump flavor." - Sam Stoddard on ending the separation of allied/enemy dual lands. 05 July 2013
I guess I'll provide the obligatory "Yeah, You Know Me" comment.

Really though, good article. Most of these I had figured out, but I didn't get the Myr-midon connection. Very nice.

As always, the flavor is appreciated and tasty.  
The term myr comes from myrmidon, which is a henchman or follower—appropriate for this race of eager-to-serve artifact creatures.

Huh. I would have bet good money it came from Myrmecology, the study of ants.

EDIT: in fact this article suggests it is based on myrmecology:
3. MYRMECOLOGY
myrmecology, (1902), n. The scientific study of ants.

Aren't those people at Wizards clever? Ants, myrmecology, myriapod, myr…who knew the creature type actually had its roots in a real word?

 
Dais is most definitely an Okra, and it looks like Fulgent also falls under that category.

Argent is Tofu derived from Argentum, or silver, while Oxidda is more heavily processed Tofu based on oxidation, due to the rusted (oxidized) nature of the mountain chain.

Certarch is where I get stuck. It's certainly not Okra, but I can't tell whether there's an old greek or latin root hiding in there. I'm betting the -arch is based off of the same root as "patriarch" and the like, but is the Cert- a Tofu or Twinky prefix?
Rules Nut Advisor
I think it's more that myrmecology comes from myrmecia, which comes from Myrmidon, which is also where Myr comes from. The same root word; quite where you choose to draw the branches is somewhat subjective.

And yay. Words are indeed fun. And I love how Magic uses so many more real-world words than most games... most of which I'm familiar with, but certain of which I encountered via Magic for the first time. Oblation, Yare, ...probably even some that aren't obscure white cantrips.
Argent isn't tofu--it's a real word used in heraldry for white/silver.

Certarch is pretty much definitely a blend, probably of cert- from certain and -arch the Greek prefix for chief/prime/head.  (Cert- could also be from a Latin word for 'to contend', but the other meaning makes more sense with Vedalken culture.)
Argent isn't tofu--it's a real word used in heraldry for white/silver.

Certarch is pretty much definitely a blend, probably of cert- from certain and -arch the Greek prefix for chief/prime/head.  (Cert- could also be from a Latin word for 'to contend', but the other meaning makes more sense with Vedalken culture.)



You're right, Argent would be Okra. I was thinking it was derived from "argentum" (which it is, but it was derived in an actual language, not by Wizards).

Certarch, I would say, is probably more likely to use the "to contend" meaning of cert-. Culture aside, the mechanics of the card seem to be more along the lines of contention than certainty. Either way, it's probably Tofu.
Rules Nut Advisor
I've always pronounced it "meer" just because it sounds best to me that way.  "Iron Mur" is kinda blah; "Iron Meer" is awesome.  "Myrmidion" I'm liable to pronounce the same way, though it's more flexible.
My New Phyrexia Writing Credits My M12 Writing Credits
As far as the benefit of the rest of Magic is concerned, gold cards in Legends were executed perfectly. They got all the excitement a designer could hope out of a splashy new mechanic without using up any of the valuable design space. Truly amazing. --Aaron Forsythe's Random Card Comment on Kei Takahashi
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