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I am here to ask for honest opinions of this new edition of Gamma world. I have enjoyed 4th edition of gamma world for about 3 years now and was excited to hear that they were finally coming out with this new 7th ed. (I never touched 5 and 6 just didn't have any group support for me). So I am curious as to the overall feel of the game. If it would be something that people might recommend I upgrade to getting as a replacement for my 4th edition.


To say, my play style personally is to take my game play seriously, but still give plenty of room for all the possible humor that a setting like this can have. There is just something fun about having a game where they are trying to earn the right to own a space station, but need to clear it of zombies first then having one of your characters at the table shoot paralytic gas heat seeking missiles at zombies. I will let the poor logical choices that he made sink in for a moment.


The sudden quiet at the table is hilarious as everyone vows to never let them near heat seeking missiles again.

The new Gamma World is really, really flexible. I think the games 'default' flavor trends a bit toward the more lighthearted / tongue-in-cheek style that I've always associated with Gamma World, while maintaining the old-school attitude that the world is crazy-dangerous, and characters can get melted into goo in the blink of an eye if you're incautious or (very) unlucky.

If you want to play it with a bit less 'wacky and random', the most recent D&D Podcast mentioned the most simple idea in the world in order to make the Mutations less zany and more characterful - don't have your Alpha Mutations constantly in flux. Make either a very restricted deck of them and/or have them change only on Extended Rests or when subjected to a lot of radiation (or other similarly potent, physiology-altering exposure), or just have your Alpha Mutations be 'fixed' and treat them exactly like the kinds of powers that D&D4 characters have.

Basically, if you take out the constantly-changing wackiness of the Alpha Mutations, it is possible to run the game 'right out of the box' otherwise as a much more 'serious' game.
As it stands, the game rides on randomness, which is not a bad thing. Random origins, random constantly fluxing mutant powers, random junk.

This lends itself to humour... but is not inherently humourous.

The tone of the book and some flavour text (like Footus Ginormicus) is silly, but it's easy to disregard that.

Ultimately, the game is as serious as you make it. While it's fun, they do emphasize that it's easy to die and it should be expected. The seriousness of any game is ultimately up to the GM... and players. If one player keeps singing "Mushroom Mushroom!" every time you encounter badders, or "Welcome to Joe's apartment" for klickys... it won't stay serious.

The one drawback to long term serious games is the level cap.

The game is designed to cap at level 10... and you get there quite fast.
XP table as so

1 - 0
2 - 500
3 - 1000
4 - 2000
5 - 3000
6 - 4000
7 - 5000
8 - 6500
9 - 8500
10 - 10000

XP for monsters is the same as D&D, so level 1 monsters are 100 XP, level 2 are 125...

Assuming "perfectly balanced" encounters (1 monster per PC, same level as the PC), you hit level 10 in about 46 encounters... In D&D, that many encounters would take you to Level 5, halfway to 6 (based on 10 balanced encounters per level).
You shaev a few off for quest awards... that's 4-5 encounters per level... and 4-5 encounters is a typical game session.

So you're looking at hitting level cap in under 3 months.
This game is not designed for long term play - to make it happen, you need to houserule a lot.
Doubling or tripling the XP needed (or dividing XP awards) is the simplest way to do it. Requires no other changes or modifications, still inherently balanced.
AlexandraErin: If last season was any indication, I think Encounters is pretty much the elemental opposite of "organized" play!
The setting looks like a yawner to me, I'm just not interested in it.

Where's my Ravenloft campaign setting?
As a fan of 4th Ed GW, I was very disappointed with White Wolf's 6th edition.
But WOTC's 7th edition has impressed me and I have a good feeling GW is not dead.

This new GW does lean to the humorous side and because it runs fast we've found thats a good thing. It really does give a nod back to the classic days of dying like crazy and not caring too much about alot of rules.

The cards have been alot of fun as it has streamlined the time to look up artifacts/mutations, write them down, etc. 

Im not saddened at all by the lack of setting material, because I have all my old GW books & would hate to have them change the world I grew up with (like other ed. did). 

Its definitely worth the $40 for a GW grognard who really wants to relive Gamma Terra again.
The setting is a "yawner" because there is precisely one (1) page of background material in the entire game.

Gamma World is basically a sandbox game. While I am not so wild about the randomness of everything, I am glad that the designers realized it was a sandbox and left it open. (I probably would not have liked the setting they had created if they had gone to the trouble to create one.) But this does create friction with 4Es mechanics and design principles, which are not conducive to the sandbox. GW designers have made some changes, mostly by simplifying the game, to make this work better.

For example, in 4E players are expected to do 3-5 encounters between each extended rest. They have enough daily powers to use about 1 of them each encounter, they have about as many magic item daily powers to make it through that far, they have enough healing surges, and action points keep them going forward. Dungeons and other adventures are all structured with this 3-5 encounter limit in mind; occasional exceptions -- in which players must go farther or longer than they want to, because of a time limit or other inability to rest -- are exceptions which prove this rule.

But in GW, you don't run out of daily powers because you never had them in the first place. You never run out of surges because you never had any. This eliminates the 3-5 encounter structure and players now have much more freedom to go where they want, when they want. They stop when they want to stop, and go on when they want to go on. That's good.

4E also designs encounters around the players. That's not true of a sandbox, where the GM places monsters all around the setting and then the players decide where to go. 1st level characters find a 10th level solo? That should not happen in 4E. But it can happen in a sandbox. And it's up to the Gamma World GM and his players to decide what kind of game they want to have. My hunch is that if your party runs into a Mk. X Eradicator or something and you all die, it shouldn't be a big deal. It should be "roll up new characters!" and pass the Doritos. But this makes it hard to tell a consistent story.

Gamma World isn't really about story. Alas. Ravenloft, by contrast, is all about story. Your game is coming.
The Doctor Comics Blog: doctorcomics.blogspot.com On Twitter @doctorcomics GW Card List: http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75882/26023881/Card_List
The seriousness of any game is ultimately up to the GM... and players. If one player keeps singing "Mushroom Mushroom!" every time you encounter badders (...)



Wait, are you saying there are groups in which the players DON'T do this whenever you see a badder?!

Caoimhe Ora Snow

Game Designer, The Queen's Cavaliers

5e D&D Stuff: Birthright Conversion


The game is designed to cap at level 10... and you get there quite fast.
XP table as so

1 - 0
2 - 500
3 - 1000
4 - 2000
5 - 3000
6 - 4000
7 - 5000
8 - 6500
9 - 8500
10 - 10000

XP for monsters is the same as D&D, so level 1 monsters are 100 XP, level 2 are 125...

Assuming "perfectly balanced" encounters (1 monster per PC, same level as the PC), you hit level 10 in about 46 encounters... In D&D, that many encounters would take you to Level 5, halfway to 6 (based on 10 balanced encounters per level).
You shaev a few off for quest awards... that's 4-5 encounters per level... and 4-5 encounters is a typical game session.

So you're looking at hitting level cap in under 3 months.
This game is not designed for long term play - to make it happen, you need to houserule a lot.
Doubling or tripling the XP needed (or dividing XP awards) is the simplest way to do it. Requires no other changes or modifications, still inherently balanced.



In another thread, there's been some discussion on what could be done with levels 11-12.

community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/758...

True, but that involves a LOT of houseruling, none of which is inherently balanced. It takes a lot of work to add something that huge to a game - not to mention needing to create even more powerful monsters.

Slowing XP is so minor it can barely be called a house rule, simply because it doesn't really change anything
AlexandraErin: If last season was any indication, I think Encounters is pretty much the elemental opposite of "organized" play!