Interesting items from Rules Compendium

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Here are some things I found interesting in the Rules Compendium.

1. Penalties from the same named game element do not add together. (p. 29)  The PHB rule for this used to only apply to penalties from powers.

2. There are 2 types of powers, attack and utility.  If the type is not specified and the power has an attack roll or deals damage, it is an attack power. Otherwise it is a utility power.  (p. 89/90)

3. When swapping powers, you must keep at least one power from your class of each particular type .  The types for this are at-will attack, encounter attack, daily attack, utility.  (p. 90)

4. When a non-adventurer power (such as an item power) does not list a level, it is the same level as the game element it comes from. (p. 93)

5. Non-adventurer powers often lack a target line, their target information is part of another entry. (p. 95).  This seems to indicate that creatures affected by these powers count as targets, even though there is not a target line in the power.

6. The size of a close power also counts as its range. (p. 103) Clears up questions about moveable close bursts.

7. If you target an ally with a power that targets allies only, the ally can ignore the power.  If you target an ally with a power that targets creatures, they cannot ignore the power.  Ally is defined as a companion of the power's user.  Enemy is defined as an opponent of the power's user. (p. 106)

8. The "sack of rats" rule applies to any effects that occur upon hitting, missing, or otherwise affecting a target. (p. 108)  It used to only apply to effects that happened upon hitting the target.

9. When creating a wall, the vertical squares count against the limit.  A wall 8 is only 8 squares total, the vertical squares count against the total number.  (p. 110)

10. The Rattling keyword no longer requires you to attack.  It says that you just have to deal damage with the Rattling power to give the -2 penalty.  (p. 119)

11. At-will stances do not end at the end of the encounter.  (p. 120)

12. Monster knowledge works off the new easy/moderate/hard DCs rather than being a fixed value for each tier. (p. 129)

13. Immediate reactions do not have to wait until the triggering power is completely resolved.  If you are targeted by a multi-attack power, you can react to the first attack, which might invalidate the second attack. (p. 196)

14. Triggered actions that are not immediate or opportunity actions work like immediate reactions, unless they need to be an interrupt in order to function. (p. 197)  Previously, the PHB FAQ only said that they did not work as interrupts, not that they did work as reactions.

15. The creature whose turn it is chooses the order of start and end of turn effects.  (p. 197/199)

16. A creature's space is 3d and cubic in shape (p. 200)

17. Creatures in the same square are considered adjacent (p. 201)

18. When forced off an edge or into hindering terrain, the forced movement ends after the saving throw is resolved.  (p. 213).  This was not clear in the old rules, and some thought you could continue with forced movement after resolving the saving throw.

19. Opportunity Attack, Bull Rush, and Grab are now attack powers. Opportunity Attack wins the award for longest trigger.  "Trigger: An enemy that you can see either leaves a square adjacent to you or uses a ranged or an area power while adjacent to you." (p. 215,246) 

20. Aid another now only applies to skill and ability checks.  To aid someone on defense or attack, there are separate actions called Aid Defense and Aid Attack. (p. 237/328)  I guess this might break some things that refer to aid another and attack rolls.

21. Administering a potion to a non-helpless willing ally is a standard action.  (p. 244)

22. The rules indicate that you can jump off a mount to dismount. (p. 253)






12. Did they change what you learn from Monster Knowledge checks?

15. Not sure I understand what your saying, can you elaborate?

19. More powers mean less options for druids in Beast Form, hopefully they will have a fix in November.

20.  Is Aiding still a static DC 10?

Thanks for posting!

Yeah, this is a nice little list. Thanks!
They've cleared up a lot of things, it seems like.  Nicely compiled.
Here are a few things I found interesting:

* The distance you clear vertically on a long jump has changed.  Old rule was that you cleared a number of feet equal to 1/4 * number of feet you actually jumped horizontally.  New rule is that you clear a number of feet (assuming a result of 10+) equal to 2 + the number of squares you could have jumped over with your Athletics check.  (RC, p. 140)

* Actual rules for combining movement modes (e.g., walking and then flying): a creature can move a total number of squares equal to the highest movement mode, with each mode indicating the maximum they can move in that mode (RC, p. 204).

* Falling does not provoke opportunity actions (RC, p. 209).

* Being unable to take opportunity actions no longer prevents you from flanking (RC, p. 218) or ends a Grab (RC, p. 243).

* You can now Delay while dazed (RC, p. 242; compare with PH, p. 288).

* You can ready an action for a creature ending their movement (which is something I would have been emphatic yesterday was against the rules), not just for when they move to a particular location (RC, p. 247).
Man, lost a line by line response.

Some of these were already rules (either in the original books or updates).  Others are new, some good and some bad.  I'll start enough response.
Here are some things I found interesting in the Rules Compendium.

2. There are 2 types of powers, attack and utility.  If the type is not specified and the power has an attack roll or deals damage, it is an attack power. Otherwise it is a utility power.  (p. 89/90)

Wow, were Druids that overpowered? They lose the ability to use non-attack racial powers in beastform. (They can't use attack, utility, or feat powers without the Beastform keyword. Now anything that isn't an attack power is a utility power, and thus not usable unless it has that keyword.)

9. When creating a wall, the vertical squares count against the limit.  A wall 8 is only 8 squares total, the vertical squares count against the total number.  (p. 110)

That means if an enemy creates a wall at its maximum length, I can basically ignore it. I'd need a roll of 1 on an Athletics or Acrobatics check to jump over or onto it. This is at level 4. Hopefully they are enlarging Wall spells to deal with this little issue.

19. Opportunity Attack, Bull Rush, and Grab are now attack powers. Opportunity Attack wins the award for longest trigger.  "Trigger: An enemy that you can see either leaves a square adjacent to you or uses a ranged or an area power while adjacent to you." (p. 215,246) 

And they lack the Beastform keyword. See comment on item 2.

"The world does not work the way you have been taught it does. We are not real as such; we exist within The Story. Unfortunately for you, you have inherited a condition from your mother known as Primary Protagonist Syndrome, which means The Story is interested in you. It will find you, and if you are not ready for the narrative strands it will throw at you..." - from Footloose
20.  Is Aiding still a static DC 10?

As of the July update, no. It's 10 plus half the level of the character you are aiding. Thus, assuming you add no training or other bonuses to the relevant skill, it remains a constant die roll as the two of you level up.

"The world does not work the way you have been taught it does. We are not real as such; we exist within The Story. Unfortunately for you, you have inherited a condition from your mother known as Primary Protagonist Syndrome, which means The Story is interested in you. It will find you, and if you are not ready for the narrative strands it will throw at you..." - from Footloose
Already existed in the rules:
2 (technically, there area 4+ types, attack, utility, feat and class), 7 (allies were already able to ignore powers targeting them), 9 (clarification, board concensus agreed with this), 13, 15 (I think),

Already addressed in updates:
1, 20

New or slightly modified rules:
3 (used to be just hybrids), 4 (pointless/meaningles rule), 5 (bad rule, targets were previously targets), 6 (major change to powers such as Consecrated Ground), 8 (bad, now leaders that have effects that help allies require enemies if they target them),  12 (maybe good or bad, needs more info), 14 (bad rule, breaks many triggered free actions), 16 (good rule), 17 (good rule), 18 (bad rule, failed save should allow continues forced movement), 19 (good rule)

No comment:
10, 11, 21, 22
Can someone share if they updated the line of sight rules at all?
Already existed in the rules:
2 (technically, there area 4+ types, attack, utility, feat and class)

No, this did not already exist in the rules. There WERE quite a few powers that were neither Attack nor Utility powers. Sources for these powers included feats, classes, races, and items. Now all powers are either Attack or Utility, period, it says so right in the comprehensive book of rules.

Druids can't use Attack or Utility powers while in beast form, if they don't have the Beastform keyword.

They used to be able to use, for example, racial powers (that weren't attacks) while in beast form.

9 (clarification, board concensus agreed with this)

This also did not already exist in the rules. It was an area that needed to be covered but wasn't.

Originally WotC ignored the third dimension, and then as time went on they have been trying to patch it in on a situation-by-situation basis.

In this case, IMHO, they did very badly. Most walls are Wall 5. Such a wall can obstruct a space that covers two squares on the ground, under this rule - otherwise it is trivially easy for most Strength-based characters with Athletics to jump onto or over it by mid-Heroic.  (Oddly enough, it is slightly easier to jump completely over the wall, including several squares of movement in the course of your jump, than to merely jump onto the wall.)

And one could argue the case for Dex-based characters with Acrobatics as well - surely it is no harder to somersault over a 5-foot-high wall, which possibly (depending on what kind of wall it is) can support you in the process, than to somersault over a 6-foot-high enemy who gets an OA on you for the attempt?

I play a character who's good in both of those skills, so I get a choice of how to get over the wall.

, 13, 15 (I think),

Correct on both of those. Also the rest of your list, I think, except that #16 and #17 were at least generally accepted.

"The world does not work the way you have been taught it does. We are not real as such; we exist within The Story. Unfortunately for you, you have inherited a condition from your mother known as Primary Protagonist Syndrome, which means The Story is interested in you. It will find you, and if you are not ready for the narrative strands it will throw at you..." - from Footloose
Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't there an adjustment to the horizontal jumping rules that dramatically reduced the vertical hight cleared?  I wonder what the new odds of clearing a 5'x5' cube are for our typical heroic/paragon athlete (I don't have the new changes in front of me atm).
No, this did not already exist in the rules. There WERE quite a few powers that were neither Attack nor Utility powers. Sources for these powers included feats, classes, races, and items. Now all powers are either Attack or Utility, period, it says so right in the comprehensive book of rules.

Druids can't use Attack or Utility powers while in beast form, if they don't have the Beastform keyword.

They used to be able to use, for example, racial powers (that weren't attacks) while in beast form.

Agreed, I read this wrong.  It does seem to be reclassifying all powers as either attack powers or utility powers, regardless of original type.

This also did not already exist in the rules. It was an area that needed to be covered but wasn't.

Originally WotC ignored the third dimension, and then as time went on they have been trying to patch it in on a situation-by-situation basis.

In this case, IMHO, they did very badly. Most walls are Wall 5. Such a wall can obstruct a space that covers two squares on the ground, under this rule - otherwise it is trivially easy for most Strength-based characters with Athletics to jump onto or over it by mid-Heroic.  (Oddly enough, it is slightly easier to jump completely over the wall, including several squares of movement in the course of your jump, than to merely jump onto the wall.)

And one could argue the case for Dex-based characters with Acrobatics as well - surely it is no harder to somersault over a 5-foot-high wall, which possibly (depending on what kind of wall it is) can support you in the process, than to somersault over a 6-foot-high enemy who gets an OA on you for the attempt?

I play a character who's good in both of those skills, so I get a choice of how to get over the wall.

Interesting.  I recall any number of threads where consensus is that vertical squares in a wall's height count against the squares of the wall.  For example an Wall 8 (with maximum height of 4) can be 8 by 1 high, 4 by 2 high or 2 by 4 high.  But looking at the definition of Wall in the compendium, it certainly doesn't specify that outright.
Was the issue addressed where you could delay your turn to avoid a negative effect which has "Until the end of your turn" where "your" = the creature that used the power?

(By RAW this works, but we always houserule it otherwise) 
Was the issue addressed where you could delay your turn to avoid a negative effect which has "Until the end of your turn" where "your" = the creature that used the power?

(By RAW this works, but we always houserule it otherwise) 



PHB pg 268 says that effects which "are beneficial to you or your allies" end.  The example is that if you stunned an enemy until the end of your next turn, and you delay, the stun ends when you delay.

RAW is very, very clear that that does not, in fact, work.
The difference between madness and genius is determined only by degrees of success.

12. Did they change what you learn from Monster Knowledge checks?

15. Not sure I understand what your saying, can you elaborate?

19. More powers mean less options for druids in Beast Form, hopefully they will have a fix in November.

20.  Is Aiding still a static DC 10?

Thanks for posting!




12. Here is how it works. The DM chooses the medium DC based on the monster's level.  If the check succeeds, you get origin, type, typical temperament, and keywords.  If you meet or exceed the hard DC, you get resistances, vulnerabilities, and powers.

15. if you have different effects that happen at the start of your turn, you get to choose the order that they resolve.  Most people probably played it that way already, but now it is actually in the rules.  As far as I know, the rules previous to this did not say how to determine the order of these things, except for saving throws.

20. Aid another is 10+half level, it was changed from DC 10 a while ago in a rules update.  Aid attack and aid defense are automatic
Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't there an adjustment to the horizontal jumping rules that dramatically reduced the vertical hight cleared?  I wonder what the new odds of clearing a 5'x5' cube are for our typical heroic/paragon athlete (I don't have the new changes in front of me atm).

  Yes, see post #5 above by bgibbons.


Was the issue addressed where you could delay your turn to avoid a negative effect which has "Until the end of your turn" where "your" = the creature that used the power?

(By RAW this works, but we always houserule it otherwise) 



They re-wrote the delaying rules, but the only functional difference is that delaying is now a free action that you have to take right when your turn is about to start.  It used to be no action.

The issue you mention still works.  If another creature places a negative effect on you that lasts until the end of that creature's next turn, you can delay until after that creature's next turn, and take your turn without that effect on you.
Already existed in the rules:
2 (technically, there area 4+ types, attack, utility, feat and class)

No, this did not already exist in the rules. There WERE quite a few powers that were neither Attack nor Utility powers. Sources for these powers included feats, classes, races, and items. Now all powers are either Attack or Utility, period, it says so right in the comprehensive book of rules.

Druids can't use Attack or Utility powers while in beast form, if they don't have the Beastform keyword.

They used to be able to use, for example, racial powers (that weren't attacks) while in beast form.




I wonder if this rule makes class feature powers count as attack or utility powers.  If so, Flurry of Blows would appear to be an attack power.  Also, if your class gives you attack/utility powers, they would count for the powers you need to keep when power swapping.
Was the issue addressed where you could delay your turn to avoid a negative effect which has "Until the end of your turn" where "your" = the creature that used the power?

(By RAW this works, but we always houserule it otherwise) 

 

PHB pg 268 says that effects which "are beneficial to you or your allies" end.  The example is that if you stunned an enemy until the end of your next turn, and you delay, the stun ends when you delay.

RAW is very, very clear that that does not, in fact, work.




The example is I slow an enemy until the end of my next turn. The monster delays his turn until after my turn...thereby avoiding the negative effect of being slowed on his own turn.

This works.

Was the issue addressed where you could delay your turn to avoid a negative effect which has "Until the end of your turn" where "your" = the creature that used the power?

(By RAW this works, but we always houserule it otherwise) 



They re-wrote the delaying rules, but the only functional difference is that delaying is now a free action that you have to take right when your turn is about to start.  It used to be no action.

The issue you mention still works.  If another creature places a negative effect on you that lasts until the end of that creature's next turn, you can delay until after that creature's next turn, and take your turn without that effect on you.



This is an issue that needs to be errata'd.

And it works both ways...monsters can delay to avoid negative effects from you. 
Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't there an adjustment to the horizontal jumping rules that dramatically reduced the vertical height cleared?  I wonder what the new odds of clearing a 5'x5' cube are for our typical heroic/paragon athlete (I don't have the new changes in front of me atm).

No, I am not finding any changes that affect this. Although it isn't as easy as I thought - for some reason the vertical height of a high jump is calculated in feet, not squares.

Still, while looking at this I found another easy way to deal with some 5-foot walls.

The Dex-based character can use Acrobatics to do a tumbling leap over the wall and land on his feet.
  • Solid wall, that will bear his weight and that he can touch safely: This looks like medium difficulty to me. If the character fails, he probably is at least on the wall if not past it it - but prone.

  • Other wall: Probably hard difficulty. If the character fails, he may suffers some or all of the penalties for touching/entering the wall (at the DM's discretion of course). He also might pass the wall in spite of the failure. But wherever he ends up, if he failed he's prone.


The Str-based character can use Athletics to either:
  • Climb onto the solid wall, which I rate as DC 15 per the guidelines in PHB1 - but consumes two squares of movement. If the character fails, he's standing next to the wall where he attempted to climb.

  • Jump over the impenetrable wall. This is any wall where for any reason the character can't enter the wall's space. He has to clear the one-square height so he needs a 4-square jump, which is (assuming a running start) DC 20, plus he has to actually have 4 squares of movement available in order to land upright on the far side in addition to what it takes to just get over the wall. If the character rolls too low, he's prone adjacent to the wall before crossing it. If he rolls high enough but runs out of movement, he is prone at the point where he runs out of movement.

  • Jump over the penetrable wall. This is a lot like the impenetrable wall except in the case of a low roll. He'll jump a shorter distance, thus not get sufficient height to clear the wall - which means he enters the wall's space and suffers some or all of the penalties for doing so; however, since it's a penetrable wall this doesn't automatically stop his movement or cause him to fall prone. Potentially he can continue on.

  • Jump onto the solid wall. The height calculation gives this DC 25 (with a running start). If the character fails, he's standing adjacent to the wall but does not cross it.


I happen to play a level-4 balanced Str/Dex character in hide armor and trained in both the relevant skills. For the tumbling leap I have to roll (natural die roll) 2 or higher for a safe solid 5-foot wall; for climbing I have to roll 5 or higher.

(Note: if there are penalties for entering a square adjacent to a wall... managing to safely jump the wall is a very low probability thing in Heroic, even with just a 5-foot wall. You need to get Athletics plus jumping-specific bonuses totaling at least 20 for it to even be possible.)
"The world does not work the way you have been taught it does. We are not real as such; we exist within The Story. Unfortunately for you, you have inherited a condition from your mother known as Primary Protagonist Syndrome, which means The Story is interested in you. It will find you, and if you are not ready for the narrative strands it will throw at you..." - from Footloose
They clarified that minions only count as becoming bloodied if you knock them unconscious instead of killing them. (p. 257)

They removed the line "You're at 0 or negative hit points." From the Dying condition (p. 231).  No more transferring this condition to an enemy to auto-kill it.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't there an adjustment to the horizontal jumping rules that dramatically reduced the vertical height cleared?  I wonder what the new odds of clearing a 5'x5' cube are for our typical heroic/paragon athlete (I don't have the new changes in front of me atm).



No, I am not finding any changes that affect this. Although it isn't as easy as I thought - for some reason the vertical height of a high jump is calculated in feet, not squares.



Yes, the method for determining height cleared in a horizontal jump has changed...

The old method was that your vertical clearance was equal to one quarter of the distance covered horizontally. The further you jumped, the higher you jumped.

The new method is a math formula connected only to your check, not the distance covered horizontally. Divide your check result by 10, and add 2 if the result is at least one. This is the number of feet you cleared vertically.

This has the result, intentional or not, that (successful) standing long jumps cover more height vertically than a minimum successful check for a running long jump over the same horizontal distance.

In order to clear a 4 square gap, a standing jump requires a 40 Athletics check, and clears 6 feet vertically.

A running leap over the same gap, taking off and landing in the exact same squares, only needs a 20 Athletics check... and clears 4 feet vertically.


This is not a signature.
The ability of a create to delay to avoid a penalty really isn't that big of a deal. When you delay, you are delaying past the turn of another creature-this means you are giving that creature a "bonus term" relative to yourself. A creature who delays until after the turn of the creature who acted just immediately before it, then, essentially just lost an entire turn. This is doubly or triply so of solo monsters (of whom, in my not-so-humble opinion, are totally incapacitated by the prevalance of End of Next Turn effects to begin with), who are often faced with an entire party that-assuming they're a cohesive enough unit-can use delaying to their own advantage to maximize the impact of status effects.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't there an adjustment to the horizontal jumping rules that dramatically reduced the vertical height cleared?  I wonder what the new odds of clearing a 5'x5' cube are for our typical heroic/paragon athlete (I don't have the new changes in front of me atm).



No, I am not finding any changes that affect this. Although it isn't as easy as I thought - for some reason the vertical height of a high jump is calculated in feet, not squares.



Yes, the method for determining height cleared in a horizontal jump has changed...

The old method was that your vertical clearance was equal to one quarter of the distance covered horizontally. The further you jumped, the higher you jumped.

The new method is a math formula connected only to your check, not the distance covered horizontally. Divide your check result by 10, and add 2 if the result is at least one. This is the number of feet you cleared vertically.

This has the result, intentional or not, that (successful) standing long jumps cover more height vertically than a minimum successful check for a running long jump over the same horizontal distance.

In order to clear a 4 square gap, a standing jump requires a 40 Athletics check, and clears 6 feet vertically.

A running leap over the same gap, taking off and landing in the exact same squares, only needs a 20 Athletics check... and clears 4 feet vertically.




That's pretty reasonable, actually.  Since you have a faster horizontal speed with a running start, you wouldn't have to jump as high to clear the same horizontal distance.

Was the issue addressed where you could delay your turn to avoid a negative effect which has "Until the end of your turn" where "your" = the creature that used the power?



They re-wrote the delaying rules, but the only functional difference is that delaying is now a free action that you have to take right when your turn is about to start.  It used to be no action.

The issue you mention still works.  If another creature places a negative effect on you that lasts until the end of that creature's next turn, you can delay until after that creature's next turn, and take your turn without that effect on you.



This is an issue that needs to be errata'd.

And it works both ways...monsters can delay to avoid negative effects from you. 




You have to really push some loopholes in wording in order to believe this is true. P. 242 of the Compendium: "End of Turn after creature acts... harmful effects that last until the end of the creature's turn now end - they cannot be avoided by delaying." Therefore, if a creature starts its turn slowed and delays, it stays slowed until whenever it finishes its turn, regardless if the creature ends it turn before or after whoever casted it. Slowed and any other negative condition "cannot be avoided by delaying".

The wording of this rule could be a little bit tighter because very few (if any) harmful spells last until the end of the target's turn; they mostly last until the end of the caster's turn. But if conditions could be avoided by delaying, the sentence I quoted from the Compendium would apply to 0 cases and make no sense. This is a case of pushing a misplaced word or interpretation against what the rule really means to say - and we all know that D&D players are not exactly immune to that.

Was the issue addressed where you could delay your turn to avoid a negative effect which has "Until the end of your turn" where "your" = the creature that used the power?



They re-wrote the delaying rules, but the only functional difference is that delaying is now a free action that you have to take right when your turn is about to start.  It used to be no action.

The issue you mention still works.  If another creature places a negative effect on you that lasts until the end of that creature's next turn, you can delay until after that creature's next turn, and take your turn without that effect on you.



This is an issue that needs to be errata'd.

And it works both ways...monsters can delay to avoid negative effects from you. 




You have to really push some loopholes in wording in order to believe this is true. P. 242 of the Compendium: "End of Turn after creature acts... harmful effects that last until the end of the creature's turn now end - they cannot be avoided by delaying." Therefore, if a creature starts its turn slowed and delays, it stays slowed until whenever it finishes its turn, regardless if the creature ends it turn before or after whoever casted it. Slowed and any other negative condition "cannot be avoided by delaying".

The wording of this rule could be a little bit tighter because very few (if any) harmful spells last until the end of the target's turn; they mostly last until the end of the caster's turn. But if conditions could be avoided by delaying, the sentence I quoted from the Compendium would apply to 0 cases and make no sense. This is a case of pushing a misplaced word or interpretation against what the rule really means to say - and we all know that D&D players are not exactly immune to that.

I really am not that concerned, for the reasons outlined below: Delaying one's turn means you are effectively granting your enemies bonus actions relative to yourself. And honestly, status effects are overly powerful as is in my experience.

But I guess you can make a decent argument that it's not RAI, sure.

This has the result, intentional or not, that (successful) standing long jumps cover more height vertically than a minimum successful check for a running long jump over the same horizontal distance.

In order to clear a 4 square gap, a standing jump requires a 40 Athletics check, and clears 6 feet vertically.

A running leap over the same gap, taking off and landing in the exact same squares, only needs a 20 Athletics check... and clears 4 feet vertically.




That's pretty reasonable, actually.  Since you have a faster horizontal speed with a running start, you wouldn't have to jump as high to clear the same horizontal distance.



It also means that you need at least a 30 for a horizontal jump to clear 5' - which makes it considerably harder for the heroic character to achieve.  Not impossible by any means, mind you.  But enough to give them pause.  As it should.  This looks like a much better balance to me.  At least in regards to jumpingI can't speak to tumbling leaps and such - but if they generally require a roll of "2" and a jump requires a roll of "12" for the same challenge, something appears to be out-of-whack.  I can say that there are a number of skill powers that relate to jumping that would probably do the trick (and become more relevant now, perhaps).
The new method is a math formula connected only to your check, not the distance covered horizontally. Divide your check result by 10, and add 2 if the result is at least one. This is the number of feet you cleared vertically.

That's what the text says, but when you look at the example given, you apparently get the benefit of a running start (dividing by 5 instead of 10) even though the rule doesn't state that.

The easiest way to describe the vertical clearance rules are that you clear a number of feet equal to 2 + the number of squares you could have long jumped with that check result (assuming you could have jumped any squares with that result, and ignoring whether you actually did jump that distance or had the movement to do so).

I noted one other subtle change to long jumps.

Old version: Make an Athletics check / 10.  This is the number of squares you can leap across.  You land in the square determined by your result.

This means that actually clearing a 1-square gap requires a DC 11 (as a DC 10 causes you to land in the first square).

New version: Make an Athletics check / 10.  This is the number of squares you clear.  You land 1 square beyond the square you clear.

This means a DC 10 check actually lets you land in the second square, clearing the 1-square gap.
Was the issue addressed where you could delay your turn to avoid a negative effect which has "Until the end of your turn" where "your" = the creature that used the power?

Delay shenanigans were not dealt with, nor were Ready shenanigans.

Ready shenanigans being something along the lines of:
* You are immobilized (save ends).
* On your turn, you ready an action to charge a particular enemy when the next PC in the order attacks.
* Your turn then ends and you make your saving throw.
* Assuming you succeeding on the saving throw, when the trigger comes up, your readied action goes off.  (If you failed the saving throw, you can't perform the action, but for a lot of characters, you didn't lose anything by the attempt.)

Both of these (as well as readying an action for someone's turn so that they can't take immediate actions) are things that are best dealt with by MAD principles--as long as the players don't do them, the DM won't, and if any player starts doing this, the DM is free to do so (and usually to greater effectiveness).

I'm also wondering about Opportunity Actions.  Did Rules Compendium do anything to update them?  Another tactic that could be used by monsters and players alike is to ready an action to charge (or similar) when a monster's turn comes up, thereby negating any opportunity attack an adjacent monster could have delivered.  Is this loophole still there?

The new method is a math formula connected only to your check, not the distance covered horizontally. Divide your check result by 10, and add 2 if the result is at least one. This is the number of feet you cleared vertically.

That's what the text says, but when you look at the example given, you apparently get the benefit of a running start (dividing by 5 instead of 10) even though the rule doesn't state that.

The easiest way to describe the vertical clearance rules are that you clear a number of feet equal to 2 + the number of squares you could have long jumped with that check result (assuming you could have jumped any squares with that result, and ignoring whether you actually did jump that distance or had the movement to do so).

I noted one other subtle change to long jumps.

Old version: Make an Athletics check / 10.  This is the number of squares you can leap across.  You land in the square determined by your result.

This means that actually clearing a 1-square gap requires a DC 11 (as a DC 10 causes you to land in the first square).

New version: Make an Athletics check / 10.  This is the number of squares you clear.  You land 1 square beyond the square you clear.

This means a DC 10 check actually lets you land in the second square, clearing the 1-square gap.

Ahh. I was looking at Heroes of the Fallen Lands, rather than Rules Compendium. The example only appears in Rules Compendium.

That's probably going to trip a few people up... and drive the people who take a "Written rules always trump examples" stance batty.
This is not a signature.
I'm also wondering about Opportunity Actions.  Did Rules Compendium do anything to update them?  Another tactic that could be used by monsters and players alike is to ready an action to charge (or similar) when a monster's turn comes up, thereby negating any opportunity attack an adjacent monster could have delivered.  Is this loophole still there?

RC p.247 "If a creature readies an action that normally triggers OA's, it triggers them twice: when it readies the action and when it takes the action."
I'm also wondering about Opportunity Actions.  Did Rules Compendium do anything to update them?  Another tactic that could be used by monsters and players alike is to ready an action to charge (or similar) when a monster's turn comes up, thereby negating any opportunity attack an adjacent monster could have delivered.  Is this loophole still there?

RC p.247 "If a creature readies and action that normally triggers OA's, it triggers them twice: when it readies the action and when it takes the action."

How does that work?  Charge only triggers if you move out of a square adjacent to an enemy.  If the adjacent enemy moves away before you trigger the Charge, you won't trigger an OA.  I can see that rule causing some arguments.
RC p.247 "If a creature readies an action that normally triggers OA's, it triggers them twice: when it readies the action and when it takes the action."

How does that work?...  If the adjacent enemy moves away before you trigger the Charge, you won't trigger an OA.

The same could be said for any OA. The example in RC p.247 covers this though. You still trigger initially.

The ability of a create to delay to avoid a penalty really isn't that big of a deal. When you delay, you are delaying past the turn of another creature-this means you are giving that creature a "bonus term" relative to yourself. A creature who delays until after the turn of the creature who acted just immediately before it, then, essentially just lost an entire turn. This is doubly or triply so of solo monsters (of whom, in my not-so-humble opinion, are totally incapacitated by the prevalance of End of Next Turn effects to begin with), who are often faced with an entire party that-assuming they're a cohesive enough unit-can use delaying to their own advantage to maximize the impact of status effects.



How about this scenario:
(Numbers are monsters, Letters are players)

Round order:
A
B
1
2
C
3
D
E
4
F

Player C uses a power to slow monster 2. Monster 2's turn comes up. He delays just one turn and now can benefit from not being slowed. This can be extended to any negative condition...except for stunned (or dazed pre-Essentials).

Sorry, I don't agree with the hand waiving. This is a serious flaw in design and the powers that a player uses should work as intended... 
The ability of a create to delay to avoid a penalty really isn't that big of a deal. When you delay, you are delaying past the turn of another creature-this means you are giving that creature a "bonus term" relative to yourself. A creature who delays until after the turn of the creature who acted just immediately before it, then, essentially just lost an entire turn. This is doubly or triply so of solo monsters (of whom, in my not-so-humble opinion, are totally incapacitated by the prevalance of End of Next Turn effects to begin with), who are often faced with an entire party that-assuming they're a cohesive enough unit-can use delaying to their own advantage to maximize the impact of status effects.



How about this scenario:
(Numbers are monsters, Letters are players)

Round order:
A
B
1
2
C
3
D
E
4
F

Player C uses a power to slow monster 2. Monster 2's turn comes up. He delays just one turn and now can benefit from not being slowed. This can be extended to any negative condition...except for stunned (or dazed pre-Essentials).

Sorry, I don't agree with the hand waiving. This is a serious flaw in design and the powers that a player uses should work as intended... 



Player C now gets to go again before monster 2 goes, assuming he slowed him last turn, I can now slow him again, or maybe just kill him before he gets his turn.  Even in this completely best case scenario, the monster still lets an enemy go that wouldn't have gone again if it hadn't delayed. 

What is moster 2 going to do if Player C slows him again????.
The ability of a create to delay to avoid a penalty really isn't that big of a deal. When you delay, you are delaying past the turn of another creature-this means you are giving that creature a "bonus term" relative to yourself. A creature who delays until after the turn of the creature who acted just immediately before it, then, essentially just lost an entire turn. This is doubly or triply so of solo monsters (of whom, in my not-so-humble opinion, are totally incapacitated by the prevalance of End of Next Turn effects to begin with), who are often faced with an entire party that-assuming they're a cohesive enough unit-can use delaying to their own advantage to maximize the impact of status effects.



How about this scenario:
(Numbers are monsters, Letters are players)

Round order:
A
B
1
2
C
3
D
E
4
F

Player C uses a power to slow monster 2. Monster 2's turn comes up. He delays just one turn and now can benefit from not being slowed. This can be extended to any negative condition...except for stunned (or dazed pre-Essentials).

Sorry, I don't agree with the hand waiving. This is a serious flaw in design and the powers that a player uses should work as intended... 

The logic there is that player C, if he's going to use an ENT effect, should have delayed until just before the monster.

PLAY THE METAGAME!
I think you only play the metagame till it means an enemy that was going to be after you is now before you, meaning delay to go after an ally instead of before the ally so you can set up flanking, ready actions only so you can now have flanking or get to sneak attack again (thanx essentials), but never do it, if it means a monster gets to act before you, instead of after you.

In the case above the monster is avoiding being slowed only to now go after the creature who originally slowed him.  He played himself out, since now he can be slowed or much worse by the creature who originally affected him. 

Sure you can try to be clever with delays and readied actions but don't out think yourself and let the yourself be at the mercy of the same creature that messed you up in the first place do it again.

Disclaimer- there are in fact times where delaying can be used to get yourself in a better situation or have effect that crippled you, only make you wait a spot in initiative order, but in any case you did give up something significant in most all cases.  I just don't think its usually that useful to delay or ready just to avoid an end of monster's turn effect.
RC p.247 "If a creature readies an action that normally triggers OA's, it triggers them twice: when it readies the action and when it takes the action."

How does that work?...  If the adjacent enemy moves away before you trigger the Charge, you won't trigger an OA.

The same could be said for any OA. The example in RC p.247 covers this though. You still trigger initially.

I don't know, this still seems potentially weird. I'm aware of feats like Fey Charge and Dodgy Charge which alter charge movement in ways which mean the charge won't necessarily provoke OAs. If I'm an Eladrin and I want to ready a charge, do I really have to know ahead of time whether I'll being teleporting if I want to avoid the associated OA at the time I'm readying it?
I don't know, this still seems potentially weird. I'm aware of feats like Fey Charge and Dodgy Charge which alter charge movement in ways which mean the charge won't necessarily provoke OAs. If I'm an Eladrin and I want to ready a charge, do I really have to know ahead of time whether I'll being teleporting if I want to avoid the associated OA at the time I'm readying it?

I gotta say... that does sound Dodgy.