Fluff This! -- A Creativity-Challenging Thread

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Here's the premise: In fascinating detail, describe the previous poster's offering. At the end of your desciption, provide an offering for the next poster.

Rules
  1. Quote the previous post's offering.

  2. Descriptions should be at least three sentences, and no more than ten.

  3. You cannot describe your own offering.

  4. If your offering contains fictional words or can have more than one meaning, you may provide a single word in parentheses for guidance.

  5. An offering must be a creature, place, or thing.

  6. An offering may not be a unique individual. (save that for the Character Development threads)

  7. If you are not the first to post on an offering, please retract your post.

  8. Lastly, this is all fluff. Crunch is a no-no.

Examples of acceptable offerings   
  • an origin stone

  • thirsty sand

  • baln berries

  • skuit (mammal)

  • taldrra (tree)

  • the ruins of Mar-Akoth

  • radiant rain


Examples of unacceptable offerings   
  • Joe Sverfneblin

  • the mayor's daughter

  • the cultist leader of the Frozen Lips

  • Acquisitions Incorporated


Here's an example post:
flatknife (animal)





A flatknife is a slimy invertebrate found in freshwater. Their skin exudes a gooey film which makes them difficult to grasp. Outside of water, they will eventually dry, shrivel, and die. A flatknife will attach itself to a host, whether fish or mammal, and leech memories from it. Most often the memories eaten are those of recent events, as such their prey may become disoriented, confused, or apathetic to its current state. There are some who purposely cover themselves with flatknives to escape the stress of everyday life or the anguish of a recent event.

Offering: swipwitch (grass)





And that's how it works. Now let's have some fun!

Offering: a blood tree



Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.
Offering: a blood tree






A blood tree stands tall and proud like the maple and can be found in small groups amidst the denser forests of cooler climes.  As the name would suggest, the blood tree bears its moniker from the crimson colored sap it produces.  They are readily identifiable by the pale green leaves of the tree, as the veins of the leaves carry the scarlet color throughout, granting them the visage of decrepit hands.  Legend carries the tale that when a blood tree is felled, the cries of its brethren can be heard throughout the forest.


Offering: a grinner (humanoid)

Celebrate our differences.


a blood tree



A lazy willow leans against the bank, swaying in the breeze. Only a keen observer sees the unnatural twitch of the leaves, the way the tree moves just out of step with the wind. Only up close can one observe the thin barbs that protrude from the trunk, and by then it is far too late. The tree's sharp, thin needles dig into soft patches of skin, secreting a numbing toxin. Soon the victim loses all cares as its blood goes to feed the lurking, squamous mass beneath the "roots". The body is drawn under once dry, and careful redcaps will often dig under the notorious blood trees for the valuables of the departed.

Offering: the Chapterhouse Sidereal
Uh oh, I didn't forsee this.

Well, let's say, in these cases, to let the first poster remain. All secondary posters will have to sadly remove their post so as to not confuse the up and coming poster as to which offering to take.

However, upriest, leave what you have (or this post won't make sense), but from now on the first to post receives precedence.

I'll update the original post with this rule.




Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.
a grinner (humanoid)


Tall, lithe, and gangly, the flesh-eating grinner has smooth grey skin and stands approximately 8 feet tall, though usually remains hunched, diminishing its height to about 6 feet. When on the hunt, a grinner moves through heavily-shaded regions at a deceptively slow  pace until it spots its prey. A grinner will draw attention to itself purposefully in order for the prey to meet its paralyzing gaze. Unable to move, the unfortunate creature watches as the grinner takes long, looping strides forward while it bears its teeth in an ever-widening grin. By the time the two meet, the grinner has its hinged jaw stretched to capacity and lowers it over its hapless victim.

Offering: devil's teeth (weapon)

Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.

Offering: devil's teeth (weapon)




The business end was not shiny, nor particularly sharp; in fact it was a grimy and dull maw of slicing death. To wield it, one must grasp hold of the chain and use it like a whip. It was made up of a pair of curved blades, the inner edges of which were jagged and pitted on purpose. These "teeth" were reddened in hue by artificial dyes, and the gore that stuck to it from its previous victim's still clung to it like dark-brown confetti. Those teeth were angled obtusely to create a horrific spray of gore when they swung past each other. The two curved blades resembled half-moons, and were hinged at their ends to create a sort of mouth that bit viciously into flesh or limb when whirled about during an attack. The outer edges were jagged as well; so that regardless of how the weapon struck, it would cause significant pain to the subject. The blades were attached to a chain composed of black-dyed iron links, which were greased by the blood of those unlucky enough to be hit by the devil's teeth. 

Offering:  blood elm witch (humanoid)


Locke: [after mugging a merchant for his clothes] It's a little tight, but the price was right.
Offering:  blood elm witch (humanoid)

A blood elm witch follows the teachings of Lulurii, the Wilderness Witch, both in practice of magic and their interpersonal skills. Long thought of as cultists, blood elm witches actually follow strict codes of nonviolence toward sentient and nonsentient races alike. Though not truly pacifists, a blood elm witch will seek to mediate and arbitrate disputes where she can. Much speculation has gone into why the group only allows female members, but many believe it to be a sexist mandate from its widely-known matriarchal founder. Regardless, it is a much lauded custom among the blood elm witches. Whispered gossip claims Lulurii arrived at the tenets of the "religion" after communing with the primal spirits of blood elms.

Offering: slither rope





Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.


Offering: slither rope




Many a rogue has found himself chafed and burned, wriggling down a rope in a dark sewer. Those who can afford the cost buy slither ropes. Smoothed and flattened on one side, slither ropes have enough grip to attach climbing gear while still giving almost no resistance to the erstwhile cat burglar forced to slither along them. Frequently a prized possession, the silver-white slither rope has often found itself in adventurer's gear.

Offering: The Boulevard of Forgotten Charms

Offering: The Boulevard of Forgotten Charms


Though sources are rare and unsubstantiated, rumor persists of an elongated stone pagoda filled with wealth and riches somewhere in the Rond mountain range erected by the late King Throfton Van Bhauslenbrugg. The confusion surrounding the sudden disappearance of the vast majority of King Throfton's wealth is attributed to this mythical construction known as the Boulevard of Forgotten Charms. Allegedly, King Throfton, paranoid and suspicious, appointed a group of sages to place a special ward upon a secret vault of his own design in an undisclosed location. After all of the king's items of value and splendor were situated by blinded servants, blindfolded sages commenced and completed a two-fold ritual. The first effect robbed any who entered the Boulevard of the desire for material possessions. The second effect erased the short-term memory of all who encountered the wondrous vault. Unfortunately, the ritual was particularly effective indeed--King Throfton, the sages who performed the ritual, and all who carried the treasures into the mountains failed to recall or record where the Boulevard lies, nay, that it even existed. Yet, rumors persist...

Offering: milney ruddercrisp (food)

Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.
Offering: milney ruddercrisp (food)




Originating in a dockside tavern, ruddercrisp is an easy-to-preserve bread, somewhat like dried pita, that has become the favorite food of many sailors who need meals that aren't perishable in open air. The most famous and widely popular recipe was invented by the tavern cook Milney. By preserving salted jerky inside of the ruddercrisp bread, he added extra flavor to the standard meal and bonus nutrition to help hungry travelers.

Offering: hocota's wrath (artifact weapon)

The original core books said that this was our game too. It doesn't feel like that anymore.

Just one parenthetical word, please: artifact or weapon. (see rule #4)

The object is to let the next poster's imagination runaway with the idea.

~~~

Everyone's been doing great--cookies for all!




Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.


Offering: hocota's wrath (artifact weapon)



Don Hocota de la Campedoro is the subject of many tales. Said to ride exclusively on a donkey, the trickster "lord"'s exploits usually involve tricking wealthy barons out of their beautiful daughters. The tales of Don Hocota are mostly of this vein, but a common thread in them is his battle with the sinister Marquis Albadred. These tales culminate in a battle in which the Marquis, said to be in league with an ambiguously described Demon Prince (probably Pazuzu) was banished from the world with a blow from Don Hocota's wooden paddle. This paddle, known as Hocota's Wrath, is rumored to be passed from traveler to traveler in the Monstero wastelands. Lending credence to the tale is the similarity between Don Hocota's name and that of an old bhuka jackal deity, which suggests the tales are an allegory for a much older myth.

Offering: barbazu's delight (deliberately left ambiguous)
Barbazu's Delight is a cruel weapon devised by Barbazu The Butcher. The Butcher was a fierce warrior known throughout the land. Throughout all of his adventures, he always enjoyed forging his own weapons. Some were fine, sturdy weapons, some were not of such high quality. And then, there is this. This heavy sword was an experiment of Barbazu's. It was his test of how lethal a sword could become. A long, fine-toothed serrated edge lines one side of the blade, while vicious spikes line the opposite. The tip is sharpened to a thin point. Holding this blade, Barbazu never lost a battle.

Offtering: Maxion's Mausoleum
Offtering: Maxion's Mausoleum


Maxion's Mausoleum stands in the center of Willsburrow Lake, most of it submerged. Designed by the eccentric architect Margo Maxion, the mausoleum's initial purpose was to draw outsiders to the town of Willsburrow to incite trade, not to inter the dead. However, after the Great Flood of Downing's Eve, the town of Willsburrow was washed away--the steeple of the mausoleum remains as the only visible proof the town existed. Rumors say Maxion, in an attempt to save his edifice, barricaded the doors to the mausoleum at the sight of the oncoming flood. If this is true, ironically, Maxion's body is the mausoleum's sole inhabitant.


Offering: sprig ghost ash






Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.


Offering: sprig ghost ash




Small and pale, sprig ghost ash grows deep in forests which border on the feywild. Often overshadowed by larger trees, sprig ghost ash is prone to a variety of disfiguring infestations. These twist the trees so much that they often appear to have faces staring out of the bark, twisted and mournful fey staring out at travelers. The fey themselves laugh at such tales, but nonetheless refuse to use sprig ghost wood for their fires.

Offering: al-saur (humanoid)
Offering: al-saur (humanoid)


The al-saur are a tribe of desert dwelling lizardfolk. Their complexion is similar, but with brown shades instead of green. Having cold blood and thick skin, the al-saur actually thrive in their desert home. They have developed powerful claws and forearms for moving earth and rock, to create natural and  indicernable places to hide at night. The al-saur posess many varied diviniation rituals, looking to the  motion of the winds and the minerals within sanctified rocks for  insight. Their cheiftan, the al-saur-rei, is a practitioner of tribal magics. The al-saur-rei has the responsibility of leading the tribe to food, or drawing food to the tribe through magic. Should he be deemed irresponsible in this way, he is ritually murdered by the new al-saur-rei, and then canibalized by the most needy of the tribesmen.


Offering: Zamtack (weapon)
Let your voice be heard! Tell WotC to Publish D&D 4e under the OGL!
Offering: Zamtack (weapon)


A small, two-pronged blade designed for use in enclosed spaces, the zamtack was originally tempered by dwarven scouts who found themselves frequently besieged by drow raiding parties far beneath the earth. Unfortunately, drow raiders discovered the finely crafted weapon and refined it's form and function, creating a deadly parrying weapon that could also be hurled with startling accuracy. In frequent skirmishes, the new zamtack changed hands again, falling into the possession of eladrin warriors and being modified further for greater accuracy at the cost of deadliness.

Offering: varakith (humanoid) 

The original core books said that this was our game too. It doesn't feel like that anymore.

Offering: varakith (humanoid) 



The varakith are a race of avian beings, and though their numbers are small, they are growing quickly. Though descended from vrocks, avian demons from the abyss, varakith do not share their monstrous behavior or appearance. Their necks are shorter than that of the vrock, and their bodies are covered in healthy-seeming feathers and downy fur, usually brown, white, or red.  Legends, both their own and of surrounding cultures, state that the varakith were once vrocks whom were purified by the primal spirits, though some variations instead cite the gods Avandra or Sehanine. They appear to have retained their demonic ability to quickly adapt to their environs, allowing them to withstand the fury of nature, and expand into new lands at unprecedented rates. Though varakith are known to hunt other humanoids, they are not savage; trade between humanoid settlements and köthnark - groups of closely settled varakith nests - is relatively commonplace. The word köthnark is Abyssal for a stable, safe place; among demons, it is a curse implying weakness, but the varakith use it affectionately in reference to the place they keep their offspring.

Offering: Jadash (food)
Let your voice be heard! Tell WotC to Publish D&D 4e under the OGL!

Offering: Jadash (food)




The old halfling woman winked across the fire. "A pot of Jadash, eh? Ye're quite an adventuresome human, ain't ye?" With a nod from the traveler the crone went to work, lading crawfish and rice into the steaming broth. Shredded turnip fell into the mix, as well as the contents of the still-uncleaned cutting board. Small pieces of three varieties of cheese were melted into the broth. Finally the mixture came to a boil and the inkeeper ladled a heaping spoonful into the traveler's bowl. As the traveler leaned in to drink the crone shooed him back before grabbing a handful of sand and plopping it into the bowl. "Can't have a proper Jadash wivvout grit, now can ye?"

Offering: the Elderspawn Sea

Offering: the Elderspawn Sea


An inlet of the Jurikari Ocean, referred to as the Elderspawn Sea by the semisentient chronoans, is the race's breeding grounds. Due to their unique physiology, the chronoans are born withered and frail, but improve physically as they age, though at the same time their minds succumb to a deteriorative effect. The wisdom and life experience of the parents are passed to their offspring; as such, the newly born are the wisest and most experienced members of their race. No one knows why the chronoans continue to lay their eggs in this particular part of the Jurikari, but sages suspect the alchemical makeup of the water has special properties which assist the maturation process.

Offering: dowlette (bird)

Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.

Offering: dowlette(bird)




The dowlette is a strange flightless bird sharing a unique symbiotic relationship with a fungus, unimaginatively called dowlette caps. The adult animal has much of its body covered in these short, broad headed mushrooms, obscuring its reddish brown feathers with large, blotched caps. It stands at the height of a typical chicken, but with longer, more slender legs and a smaller body. The fungi survive by leaching nutrients from their avian host. In return, the dowlette caps provide the birds with a unique self defense mechanism. In addition to providing camouflage in the bird's swamp habitat, the caps release great quantities of spores when the dowlette vigorously flaps its wings. These spores bind and harden in contact with mucous membranes of eyes and throats, causing temporary blindness, coughing, and perhaps infection in potential predators. The dowlettes themselves are immune to these effects due to their dry throats and a second set of eyelids. dowlette chicks begin to grow fungus a week or so from hatching, from spores fallen from their parents. Both mother and father dowlettes care for the young, and are difficult for the untrained eye to tell apart.

Offering: kshev vine (plant)
EDIT: Damn, you beat me to the punch.  There goes my "Care for a moist dowlette?" joke. 


Offering: kshev vine (plant)


The kshev vine is dark green with light green and brown mottled splotches and is indigenous in jungle climates where thick mists are common, such as the outer edges of waterfalls.  Since it is well nourished, the fragile kshev vine does not sprout any leaves to speak of.  However, the skin of the vine is very tacky to the touch, allowing it to grow on just about any surface.  The kshev vine is sought by natives for its ability to soothe open wounds, although it does not offer any direct healing properties.  It is often used in native cooking as well, as it adds a subtle and cool, almost minty, flavor to soups and broths.

Offering: Aaristrar (constellation)

Celebrate our differences.

Offering: Aaristrar (constellation)


The constellation Aaristrar is also known as the Kinslayer; it resembles a dragonborn wielding two blades, shooting a cluster of stars, its breath weapon, in the direction of nearby Ixthelion, the Last Icelord.   The legend associated with Aaristrar, and by association Ixthelion, takes place in the last days of the war between Bael Turath and Arkhosia. The mighty Arkhosian warrior Aaristrar was famous for the number of tieflings he had killed in missions to infiltrate high-security locations; these locations, because of his division in the army, were only ever to secure intelligence, and rarely to control new ground. On the day of one mission in particular, a callous dragon overlord named Ixthelion made a move to secure the emperor's crown for himself, and in the aftershock of the politico-military move, Aaristrar's mate and hatchlings were slain in an influx of Turathi infantry. Aaristrar was ignorant of this until he had nearly completed his mission; in the bowls of a tiefling ritual chamber, a devil appeared before him, and revealed the "truth" behind the slayings, and offered him the power to avenge his family.  Aaristrar obliged, and paced steadily to face Ixthelion, slaying all in his path with hell-bolstered might.  He and the great Icelord finally met in combat, and the devastation was cataclysmic. But the battle never ended, for a great earthquake shook the lands and, according to legend, Ixthelion and Aaristrar flew into the sky to continue their fight - which continues to this day.

Offering: Old Green Lake (song)
Let your voice be heard! Tell WotC to Publish D&D 4e under the OGL!
Offering: Old Green Lake (song)


"Old Green Lake" is a lament for fallen warriors of an ancient battle. The nation of Kharlamen faced certain doom at the hands of demon-worshiping barbarians, the brutes' ranks bolstered by gnolls, orcs, and other races of chaos.
Their forces shattered from repeated clashes with their foes, each skirmish resulting in another crushing defeat, Kharlamen attempted one final gambit: they gathered their forces around Lokhursce's Tear (known to commoners as Green Lake), a location with no real tactical value but well-defensible nonetheless. The plan was to lure the attackers to Green Lake and stall them for as long as their defenders possibly could, affording the noncombatants and leaders of Kharlamen to flee into anonymity.
After initially winning the upper hand, Kharlamen's champions attempted to end the war once and for all, abandoning their defensive position to mount a suicide charge into their enemies' ranks. While the charge ultimately failed, it did cripple the barbarian legions such that they eventually dissolved.

The song itself is soft, almost haunting, rising to a crescendo reminiscent of screaming for the battle itself. Tapering off into despair, the song cuts off mid-verse as it begins rising into happiness again.

Offering: alamence's knot (landmass)

The original core books said that this was our game too. It doesn't feel like that anymore.


Offering: alamence's knot (landmass)



Legends tell of three great Borograv sailors who were first to land in what is now called Esterlandia. Two, Caldamane and Bonaveir, founded cities which would become capitols of new nations. Alamence longed to do better, and he sailed his triremes between the courses of his contemporaries, hoping to find vast fertile plains on which to found a new Borograv nation. What he found instead was a rocky, barren isthmus, barely capable of holding a small settlement. Each attempt at development met with disaster, and now the twisted terrain of Alamence's Knot remains a home only to shipwrecked sailors and a few hardbitten fishermen.

Offering: Githmas Morn
Offering: Githmas Morn


[You did not specify a word to disabiguate this, so I am just going on a limb here.]

Githmas is the Githyanki and Githzerai day of independence, remembering the time they broke free of their ilithid overlords.  Among githyanki, youths earn their independence from their parents on the morning of Githmas, supposing they can best them in a non-lethal duel. Failing youths are sentenced to menail physical labor for twenty-four hours, which traditionally consists of working in mines.  Among the Githzerai, Githmas Morn is "celebrated" by parents taking away a valuable toy from youngsters. This is to symbolize the self-sacrifice that must be to achieved to lead a good, free life, and also serves to bolster a sense of monastic detachment.

Offering: Book of Pages (tome)
Let your voice be heard! Tell WotC to Publish D&D 4e under the OGL!

Offering: Book of Pages (tome)




[That was an entirely appropriate limb, incidentally, though I would have been fine with someone choosing an odder disambiguation.]

Countess Zorozadny, called the Witch-Countess, was known for her insatiable appetites. After her husband became a death knight in 672 CY she turned to her young pageboys to satisfy her lusts. Villages across her domain feared the countess's recruiters. A boy who displeased the countess would merely be executed in the morning, but a far worse fate awaited those who she enjoyed. Using her mastery of necromancy the countess bound their souls into a tome, each onto a page, so that she could summon them up whenever she craved them. Each page of the tome features a lavishly illustrated picture of the boy bound into its parchment. This sinister Book of Pages is rumored to still exist in the ruins of the Witch-Countess's castle.

Offering: mimsy bandersnatch (monster)
Offering: mimsy bandersnatch (monster)


(Kudos on the Alice in Wonderland reference)

So named by the gnomes whom they harass, bandersnatches are small insectoid critters rather like pixies that flutter around on six rainbow-colored wings. These creatures are kleptomaniacal and have an obsession with, as their mispronounced elven states, "Teh shineez." A subset of bandersnatches, known to the gnomes as mimsies, can actually be somewhat tamed if bribed with the periodical gift of baubles. Mimsy bandersnatches are very useful as personal thieves and first-alert living alarms. As any gnome will tell you, it's impossible to mistake or ignore a bandersnatch's scream of distress.

Offering: the gorian desert (location)

The original core books said that this was our game too. It doesn't feel like that anymore.



Offering: the gorian desert (location)




Admiral Gorian, high Morninglord of the Radiant Armada, was the first sane being to see what is now known as the Gorian Desert. One of the few semipermanent features of the Far Realm, the Gorian "Desert" is a vast stretch of emptiness, where infinitely thin planes of sand intersect at angles that change whenever the viewer closes their eyes. Surprisingly empty of the plane's usual denizens, the Gorian Desert serves as a passable staging ground for voyages into the wider Far Realm, as it did for Gorian's colorful band of half-elf companions on their quest to slay a greater avatar of Ulban.

Offering: St. Cuthbert's Folly (flower)
Offering: St. Cuthbert's Folly (flower)


Legend tells of when St. Cuthbert was a young god, just after having been raised to divinity, he set about claiming his spheres of divine influence, as new-made gods are wont to do. At the time, he was not known as the merciless even hand of justice as he is known today. St. Cuthbert found it within himself to forgive people if their crimes were minor, provided that he received a promise that they would never again draw his ire.
St. Cuthbert's resolve was tested the day a woman of unfathomable beauty appeared before his gaze, standing above the body of her lover, whom she had slain. So enthralled with her was the new god that he descended from the heavens to speak with her personally, inquiring of her what had occurred. The woman told him a tale of abuse and hardship that stirred his heart. Had he been thinking clearly, St. Cuthbert would have notice contradictions in her narrative, but he was indisposed, paying attention to her preternatural beauty instead. He offered her clemency for her crimes, and she accepted.

Not ten years later, he saw her once again, standing above the body of a dead man. This time, it was her husband. Again, Cuthbert descended from on high, and again she told him a tale that made his heart melt. She had confessed her former sin to her husband, and he was not as forgiving as the god of justice had been. He tortured her as punishment for her crime in lieu of St. Cuthbert's intervention, until she could no longer take it and slew him with his own knife.
Again entranced by her beauty, St. Cuthbert spared her life and set her free.

Decades passed, until yet again St. Cuthbert saw the woman in his frame of vision. She was old, and her beauty had faded. A husband of equal age had died in his sleep, poisoned by his beloved wife. When St. Cuthbert moved to confront her, he found himself no longer entranced by her lost beauty, and a litany of crimes appeared before him. She had gleefully murdered her lovers, stolen, bribed, and lied even to a god himself.
Enraged beyond imagining, St. Cuthbert shed his mortal disguise and stood before her as a full god, shattering her mind with his glory.
She had polluted the world with so much ugliness, he said, that retribution was too good for her. Instead, what remained of her mind would be trapped within a thing that existed for no other reason than to be beautiful, to make people happy.
The woman let out a final scream as she shrank, turning into a flower of unfathomable beauty. So that none would ever forget the legend and allow affection to cloud their judgment, he decreed that the flower be named St. Cuthbert's Folly.

And from then on, the god of justice never again granted clemency, no matter how minor the offense.


Offering: mah jedaira (place) 

The original core books said that this was our game too. It doesn't feel like that anymore.

Please remember rule #2.


Descriptions should be at least three sentences, and no more than ten.






Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.
Oh, jeez. Sorry. Kinda got caught up in the whole thing. Want me to edit it down?

The original core books said that this was our game too. It doesn't feel like that anymore.

No, that's okay. Just from now on. ^-^

Think of it as if you are writing a lore entry for the monster manual.




Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.
Offering: mah jedaira (place) 



"Mah jedaira" is the Giant experession for an expanse of land composed mostly of glass. Mah jedaira are mostly found in the mountains, where the ties to the Elemental Chaos are strong. Goliath dawnsingers use the mah jedaira as a place to contact spirits that have not yet drifted to the afterlife. This belief is founded in the philosophy that glass is clear, and in allowing light to pass through, is aligned with "life," yet as a "stone," it is also associated with earth, the origin and final resting place for souls. Thus, mah jedaira are a natural place for sprits cought between life and death to gather. The accoustical resonance natural to glass might have contributed to this belief.

Offering: Yellow-backed footscratcher (bird)
Let your voice be heard! Tell WotC to Publish D&D 4e under the OGL!

Offering: Yellow-backed footscratcher (bird)



The yellow-backed footscratcher lives in the heat and humidity of the Burmoodi jungles. The bright orange plumage of the male is an impressive display, while the dull-brown of the female causes her to easily be mistaken as a phru quail. A characteristic stripe of yellow feathers begins at the base of the head of both genders and runs down the back to the end of the tailfeathers. Flightless birds, yellow-backs often enter into symbiosis with larger earth-bound creatures, picking parasites from hooves, paws, and feet. Because of their brilliant coloration, males are sometimes caught to sell as pets to the wealthy elite. At other times, the orange feathers are used to create boas which also fetch a princely price.

Offering: best wish (opiate)





Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.
Offering: best wish (opiate)


The opiate known as "best wish" is synthisized from the horns of the garden veriety al-mi'raj (a rabbit like creature with a horn reminicent to that of a unicorn). The commonality of the seemingly-harmless al-mi'raj is countered by their tenacity and the surprisingly high fatality rates of their exterminators.

An extracted al-mi'raj horn is ground into powder, and mixed with other ingredients, which will not be mentioned in this lore entry due to the legal restrictions of this book's region of publication. The resulting cream is then smoked, inducing extreme hollucinations almost immidiately. Tradditionaly, participants will wish each other "best wishes" before indulging themselves, for it is commonly believed that best wish manifests the topics on has presnetly on their mind. For those properly prepared, the induced hollucinations can appear to grant the user's wishes.


Offering: Refutalite (mineral)
Let your voice be heard! Tell WotC to Publish D&D 4e under the OGL!
Offering: Refutalite (mineral)


When the eladrin dug out the earth from beneath the drow city of M'tredei, they had only sabotage planned; to sink the city further below the Underdark, burying their hated brethren beneath tons of rock. However, the eladrin miners discovered thick stone, dark and unyielding. Upon realizing the potential of this substance, the mission changed: stealthily extract as much of the mineral from beneath M'tredei without sinking the city, and once all of this special stone was taken, only then would M'tredei crumble.

M'tredei's expert spies discovered the plot, and moved their forces to stop the plan. Using the mineral that they had been mining as ramshackle bunkers, the eladrin miners fortified their positions, hurling spells and weapons while they set their emergency failsafe in place: gnomish explosives to sink the great drow city.

After slaughtering the remaining drow who had survived the collapse of M'tredei, the miners returned to the surface with tales of the mineral's potency and a new name: refutalite. Despite the small amounts found at any one site, eladrin seek out new sources of the mighty stone with an almost obsessive fervor.

Offering: order of the skeletal wyrm (religion) 

The original core books said that this was our game too. It doesn't feel like that anymore.



Offering: order of the skeletal wyrm (religion) 



Wyrmcults and cults of death abound in the underdark, but none are more widespread than the Order of the Skeletal Wyrm, with size and organization approaching that of a true religion. Legend has it that the Spellcarved Shadow Dragon Thucaxes conquered a vast underdark empire by promising his troops eternal life in the spells that etched his scales. At the height of his power, Thucaxes ruled the most cosmopolitan empire in the history of the underdark, where drow, orcs, goblins and grimlocks stood united in their faith in life eternal. Soon the empire menaced the surface world, and brave adventurers assaulted Thucaxes' lair, slaying him and throwing his empire into chaos.

Soon the former empire was a mess of squabbling city-states and scattered tribes, beholden to none. However, one hundred years after his supposed slaying the priests of his former capitol declared that Thucaxes had returned to them, that he had in fact become a Dracolich and thus survived. Soon the priests declared that Thucaxes would appear to the public, and he soon did so, surrounded and guarded by priests. Belief spread once again, and while the empire remained sundered, churches of the new Order of the Skeletal Dragon sprung up across the underdark.

In truth, Thucaxes never underwent the ritual of Dracolichdom, and would have found it against his beliefs. The skeletal dragon who appears before cheering crowds is a puppet, the skeleton of the old emperor supported by cunningly hidden wires and illusion magic. Were this to be discovered, the underdark's greatest faith might crumble into dust.

Offering: Solarium of the Mother (place)
Offering: Solarium of the Mother (place)



The Solarium of the Mother is positioned high in the northern hemisphere, where The Mother constellation is able to be viewed all year around. Astrologers find The Mother to be a collection of stars of great power, particularly when "womb" of The Mother aligns with the path of the sun - a powerful omen of life.  On days of such an occurrence, the Solarium's crystalline structure lights up with a warm radiance, supposedly bringing the newly dead back to life. The Solarium was founded half a century ago by a messianic figure (who many scholars believe to have been the recipient of a star-pact) as he "...made his ascent to rejoin his heavenly Mother." Some scholars disagree on the point of the figure's power's origin, as the holy powers of life are believed to be only granted by gods, and never from the alien creatures from Beyond.

[Incidentally, I totally used the Book of Pages in my campaign today!! It was great! Thank you everyone who has contributed to this thread!]

Offering: Kileemu [Pronounced "Kee-lee-moo"] (Primate)
Let your voice be heard! Tell WotC to Publish D&D 4e under the OGL!

Offering: Kileemu [Pronounced "Kee-lee-moo"] (Primate)


The kileemu are tan colored primates who spend the majority of their lives in the treetops of the Raushta Hoost and Wrodd forests. Very sociable toward humanoids, kileemu are known to quickly charge people to search their hands and belongings though nothing has ever been taken. Most people believe kileemu are naturally tailess monkeys. The truth is the high-end sausage dish known as k'smararak is little else than ground kileemu tails spiced and served in a graulanaut sauce. With its prehensile tails, a kileemu is an agile and elusive creature; after its three tails are severed, the stunted kileemu is easy prey for dauku spinners and spotted mherutooks, predators who otherwise never would enjoy such fast food.

Offering: greed blisters (disease)





Life will knock you down. It is up to you whether to get back up.
Offering: greed blisters (disease)







Greed blisters, also known as Miser's Bane, is the result of a poison contained in tainted metal, most often found in cheaply smelted silver and gold. A lethally toxic metal called tarrelite becomes mixed with the more precious metals. In small doses, it can be flushed out of the system with minimal damage. In large concentrations, such as a massive pile of tainted coins, it causes the victim to break out in hives and festering boils. Eventually, the boils (the "greed blisters") deflate as the toxins enter the victim's system, resulting in a massive heart attack or stroke that is always fatal.


Offering: the oasis of crisis (demiplane) 

The original core books said that this was our game too. It doesn't feel like that anymore.

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