Archenemy FAQ

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_Archenemy_(TM) Frequently Asked Questions
Compiled by Mark L. Gottlieb
Document last modified June 15, 2010

An FAQ is a collection of clarifications and rulings involving the cards in a new _Magic: The Gathering_(R) set. It's intended to make playing with these new cards more fun by clearing up the common misconceptions and confusion inevitably caused by new mechanics and interactions. As future sets are released, updates to the _Magic_(TM) rules may cause some of this information to become outdated. If you can't find the answer you're looking for here, please contact us at .

This FAQ has two sections, each of which serves a different purpose.

The first section ("General Notes") explains the new mechanics and concepts in the set.

The second section ("Card-Specific Notes") contains answers to the most important, most common, and most confusing questions players might ask about cards in the set. Items in the "Card-Specific Notes" section include full card text for your reference. Not all cards in the set are listed.
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GENERAL NOTES

***Release Information***

The _Archenemy_ release consists of four different game packs: Assemble the Doomsday Machine, Bring About the Undead Apocalypse, Scorch the World with Dragonfire, and Trample Civilization Underfoot. Each game pack contains a 60-card traditional _Magic_ deck and a 20-card scheme deck. There are a total of 45 different scheme cards overall.

_Archenemy_ official release date: Friday, June 18, 2010.

Release events held June 18-20, 2010. Go to  to find an event or store near you.
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***Overview***

Archenemy is a casual variant in which one player assumes the role of the archenemy, and all the other players team up in an attempt to defeat him or her. The archenemy is aided by a supplemental deck of oversized scheme cards, which add powerful effects to the game.

All players need their own decks (made of traditional _Magic_ cards). The archenemy also needs his or her own scheme deck, made of at least twenty scheme cards and with no more than two of any scheme card with a particular English name.

An Archenemy game is best as a four-player game (played as a one vs. three matchup) among players with Constructed decks. Of course, players can set up an Archenemy game as they see fit (including playing with Limited decks, playing with more people on the team facing off against the archenemy, and so on). There's even a Free-for-All variant in which each player is an archenemy!
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***Starting an Archenemy Game***

An Archenemy game is played between two "teams." One team is the archenemy by himself or herself. The players determine, using any means they see fit, which one of them will be the archenemy that game. The opposing team may have any number of players. That team will take a shared team turn.

Before the game begins, each player shuffles his or her traditional _Magic_ deck, then the archenemy shuffles his or her scheme deck so that the cards are in a random order. The archenemy's scheme deck is placed face down next to his or her library.

The archenemy declares whether or not he or she will take a mulligan first. Then the players on the other team do the same. Teammates may consult while making their decisions. Then all mulligans are taken at the same time. (The first time a player takes a mulligan in a multiplayer game, he or she draws a new hand of seven cards rather than six cards. Subsequent hands decrease by one card as normal.) The process then repeats among the players who took mulligans. A player may take a mulligan even after his or her teammate has decided to keep his or her opening hand.

The archenemy starts the game with 40 life. Each other player starts the game with 20 life.

***Playing an Archenemy Game***

The archenemy takes the first turn of the game. Since it's a multiplayer game, the archenemy doesn't skip his or her draw step that turn.

Immediately after the archenemy's precombat main phase begins during each of his or her turns, that player sets the top card of his or her scheme deck in motion. This turn-based action doesn't use the stack. Abilities that trigger as a result of that scheme being set in motion do use the stack.

The archenemy's attacking creatures attack individual players and/or planeswalkers, not the opposing team as a whole. The archenemy can attack more than one player and/or planeswalker at once. The defending players don't have to be sitting next to the archenemy to be attacked. As the archenemy declares attackers, he or she announces which player or planeswalker each one is attacking.

During the declare blockers step, each defending player declares blockers. A player's creatures may block only the creatures that are attacking that player or one of his or her planeswalkers.

***Taking a Shared Team Turn***

Archenemy uses the shared team turn option, just as the Two-Headed Giant multiplayer variant does.

* All players on the opposing team take their turn at the same time. They all begin their draw steps or their declare attackers steps at the same time, for example.

* Each player on the opposing team draws a card during that team's draw step.

* Each player on the opposing team may play a land during each of that team's turns.

* Attacking creatures controlled by any member of the opposing team all attack at the same time. Each one must attack the archenemy or a planeswalker the archenemy controls. Players can never attack themselves or a teammate.

* The "active team" is the team whose turn it is. That may be the archenemy, or it may be the opposing team.

* The opposing team as a whole (rather than the individual players on it) gets priority. If that team has priority, any player on that team may cast a spell, activate an ability, or take a special action. If no player on that team wishes to do anything, the team passes priority.

* The player seated in the opposing team's rightmost seat (from their perspective) is its primary player. Whenever possible, each player on that team makes his or her own choices. However, if the players on that team fail to agree on a choice, such as which creatures attack or what order triggered abilities are put on the stack, the primary player makes that choice.

* Although the opposing team's turn is shared, its resources (cards in hand, mana, and so on) are not shared. Teammates may review each other's hands and discuss strategies at any time. Teammates can't manipulate each other's cards or permanents.

* Each player on the opposing team is an individual with his or her own life total. If one of those players leaves the game, the rest of the players continue to play.

* If each player would make choices and/or take actions at the same time, first each player on the active team (whether that's the archenemy or the opposing team) makes any choices required in whatever order they like, then the players on the other team do the same. Once all choices have been made, the actions happen simultaneously.

* If an effect instructs more than one player to draw cards, first each player on the active team (whether that's the archenemy or the opposing team) performs his or her draws in whatever order that team likes, then each player on the other team does the same.

* If multiple triggered abilities have triggered since the last time a team received priority, first the members of the active team (whether that's the archenemy or the opposing team) put all triggered abilities any of them controls on the stack in any order they choose, then the members of the other team do the same.

* If an effect gives a player on the opposing team an extra turn, or adds a phase or step to that player's turn, that team takes the extra turn, phase, or step. If an effect causes a player on the opposing team to skip a step, phase, or turn, that team does so. If a single effect causes more than one player on the opposing team to add or skip the same step, phase, or turn, the team adds or skips only that step, phase, or turn. If an effect causes the archenemy to control another player's turn, the archenemy controls the opposing team's turn.

***Leaving the Game***

Unlike in a two-player game, a multiplayer game continues after a player leaves the game (because that player lost the game or conceded).

* When a player leaves the game, all permanents, spells, and other cards owned by that player also leave the game.

* If that player controlled any abilities or copies of spells that were waiting to resolve, they cease to exist.

* If that player controlled any permanents owned by another player, the effects that gave control of them to the player who left end. If that doesn't give control of them to a different player (perhaps because they entered the battlefield under the control of the player who left), they're exiled.

***Winning the Game***

* The archenemy wins the game if all of his or her opponents have lost the game, or if an effect states that that player wins the game.

* The opposing team wins the game if the archenemy has lost the game, or if an effect states that a member of that team wins the game.

* If the opposing team wins the game, each member of that team wins, even those that had previously lost.
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***Supervillain Rumble Option***

As an alternative option, an Archenemy game may be played in which _each_ player is an archenemy.

* Each player must have his or her own scheme deck.

* There are no teams. Rather, the players play a Free-for-All game.

* The starting player is randomly determined. All other rules that apply to the archenemy in an Archenemy game apply to each player in a Supervillain Rumble game. Most importantly, each player sets a scheme in motion during each of his or her precombat main phases.

* A player wins the game when all his or her opponents have lost the game, or when an effect says that player wins the game.
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***New Card Type: Scheme***

Scheme cards are oversized _Magic_ cards that feature the "Archenemy" back (as opposed to the "Deckmaster" back). Each one represents a dastardly plot undertaken by the archenemy.

Behold the Power of Destruction
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, destroy all nonland permanents target opponent controls.

* Scheme cards start the game in a zone called the "command zone." They remain there throughout the game.

* Scheme cards have no mana cost. They can't be cast as spells. They're not permanents. Since scheme cards have no mana costs, they're all colorless.

* Scheme cards have no subtypes.

* A scheme card may have any number of static, triggered, and/or activated abilities. As long as a scheme card is face up in the command zone, its static abilities affect the game, its triggered abilities may trigger, and its activated abilities may be activated.

* Scheme cards refer to themselves as "this scheme" rather than by name.

* Scheme cards may be "set in motion." To set a scheme in motion, the archenemy moves the top card off of his or her scheme deck and turns it face up.

* Most scheme cards have abilities that trigger "When you set this scheme in motion." When such an ability triggers, it's put on the stack, then players may respond by casting spells and activating abilities.

* If a face-up scheme card's "When you set this scheme in motion" ability is neither on the stack nor waiting to be put on the stack (either because it resolved, it's been countered, or it left the stack after triggering because no legal targets could be chosen), that scheme card is turned face down and put on the bottom of its owner's scheme deck. This is a state-based action. Ongoing schemes (see below) are exempt from this.

* Some schemes have the supertype "ongoing." An ongoing scheme remains face up until an effect causes it to be "abandoned." To abandon a scheme is to turn it face down and put it on the bottom of its owner's scheme deck.

* A face-up scheme card that's turned face down becomes a new object with no relation to its previous existence.

* The owner of a scheme card is the player who started the game with it in his or her scheme deck. The controller of a scheme card is its owner.

* When a scheme card is turned face up, it gets a new timestamp.

* If an effect would cause a scheme card to leave the command zone, it doesn't; the scheme card remains in the command zone. If an effect would bring a scheme card into the game from outside the game, it doesn't; the scheme card remains outside the game.
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***Theme: "Hot Seat" Cards***

Some schemes cause a player to choose self or others. That player must decide whether to take one for the team, or spread the pain around (and emerge unscathed!)

Feed the Machine
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, target opponent chooses self or others. If that player chooses self, he or she sacrifices two creatures. If the player chooses others, each of your other opponents sacrifices a creature.

* The targeted player may choose "self" even if he or she can't perform the resulting action. For example, a player targeted with Feed the Machine may choose "self" even if he or she controls no creatures.

* The targeted player may choose "others" even if there are no others (because all of his or her teammates have lost the game, for example), or the archenemy's other opponents can't perform the resulting action.

* In a Supervillain Rumble game, the targeted player may still choose "others." Each player who isn't the active player or the targeted player will thus be affected.
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CARD-SPECIFIC NOTES

All Shall Smolder in My Wake
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, destroy up to one target artifact, up to one target enchantment, and up to one target nonbasic land.

* You may choose zero, one, two, or three targets.
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Approach My Molten Realm
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, until your next turn, if a source would deal damage, it deals double that damage instead.

* The effect doesn't wear off until just before your next untap step (even if an effect will cause that untap step to be skipped).

* This ability applies no matter who or what the damage would be dealt to: a creature, a player, or a planeswalker. It also doesn't matter who controls the source.

* If multiple effects modify how damage will be dealt, the player who would be dealt damage or the controller of the permanent that would be dealt damage chooses the order to apply the effects. For example, Mending Hands says, "Prevent the next 4 damage that would be dealt to target creature or player this turn" and Lava Axe says "Lava Axe deals 5 damage to target player." Suppose a Lava Axe would deal 5 damage to a player who has cast Mending Hands targeting him or herself. The player who would be dealt damage can either (a) prevent 4 damage first and then let this scheme's effect double the remaining 1 damage, taking 2 damage, or (b) double the damage to 10 and then prevent 4 damage, taking 6 damage.

* If a spell or ability divides damage among multiple recipients (such as Fireball does), the damage is divided before this effect doubles it.
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Choose Your Champion
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, target opponent chooses a player. Until your next turn, only you and the chosen player can cast spells and attack with creatures.

* The effect doesn't wear off until just before your next untap step (even if an effect will cause that untap step to be skipped).

* The player is chosen as the ability resolves. Once a player is chosen, it's too late for other players to respond by casting spells.

* The targeted opponent may choose himself or herself.

* The targeted opponent may choose you. In that case, only you can cast spells and attack with creatures before your next turn begins.

* Players other than you and the chosen player may still perform game actions besides casting spells and attacking with creatures: They may block with creatures, activate abilities, perform special actions, and so on.
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Dance, Pathetic Marionette
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, each opponent reveals cards from the top of his or her library until he or she reveals a creature card. Choose one of the revealed creature cards and put it onto the battlefield under your control. Put all other cards revealed this way into their owners' graveyards.

* You'll put just one creature card onto the battlefield this way. The other revealed creature cards, and all the revealed noncreature cards, will wind up in their owners' graveyards.

* If an opponent has no creature cards left in his or her library, that player will wind up revealing his or her entire library and putting it into his or her graveyard. You'll still get to choose a creature card revealed by another player.
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The Dead Shall Serve
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, for each opponent, put up to one target creature card from that player's graveyard onto the battlefield under your control. Each of those creatures attacks its owner each combat if able.

* For each opponent, you may choose not to target any creature cards in that player's graveyard.

* Each of the creatures you put onto the battlefield this way must attack its owner, not a planeswalker that player controls.

* If, during your declare attackers step, one of these creatures is tapped or is affected by a spell or ability that says it can't attack, then it doesn't attack. If there's a cost associated with having that creature attack, you aren't forced to pay that cost, so it doesn't have to attack in that case either.

* If one of these creatures can't attack its owner during any given turn (due to a spell or ability such as Chronomantic Escape, or because a player on the opposing team has gained control of it, for example), it may attack another player, attack a planeswalker an opponent controls, or not attack at all. If there's a cost associated with having that creature attack its owner, you aren't forced to pay that cost, so it may attack another player, attack a planeswalker an opponent controls, or not attack at all.

* If there are multiple combat phases in a turn, each of these creatures must attack its owner in each of them that it's able to.
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A Display of My Dark Power
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, until your next turn, whenever a player taps a land for mana, that player adds one mana to his or her mana pool of any type that land produced.

* The ability affects all players, not just you.

* The effect doesn't wear off until just before your next untap step (even if an effect will cause that untap step to be skipped).

* The types of mana are white, blue, black, red, green, and colorless.

* If a land produces more than one type of mana at a single time (as Boros Garrison does, for example), the land's controller chooses which one of those types of mana is produced by the delayed triggered ability.

* If a land is tapped for mana but doesn't produce any (for example, if you tap Gaea's Cradle for mana while you control no creatures), the delayed triggered ability won't produce any mana either.
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Every Hope Shall Vanish
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, each opponent reveals his or her hand. Choose a nonland card from each of those hands. Those players discard those cards.

* First you choose a nonland card in each opponent's hand (if he or she has any). Then all the chosen cards are discarded at the same time.
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Every Last Vestige Shall Rot
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, you may pay {X}. If you do, put each nonland permanent target player controls with converted mana cost X or less on the bottom of its owner's library.

* You choose the target player when the ability triggers. As the ability resolves, you choose a value for X and decide whether to pay {X}. If you do decide to pay {X}, it's too late for any player to respond since the ability is already in the midst of resolving.
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I Bask in Your Silent Awe
Ongoing Scheme
(An ongoing scheme remains face up until it's abandoned.)
Each opponent can't cast more than one spell each turn.
At the beginning of your upkeep, if no opponent cast a spell since your last turn ended, abandon this scheme.

* Players can't respond to the action of setting a scheme in motion. That means that if this scheme is turned face up, your opponents can't cast spells before the static ability takes effect.

* If any of your opponents cast a spell during your upkeep or draw step, that player can't cast another spell during the turn this scheme is set in motion.

* The scheme is abandoned if all your opponents refrain from casting spells during their entire turn, and during your subsequent upkeep before this scheme's last ability resolves. They may still activate abilities and perform special actions.
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I Call on the Ancient Magics
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, each other player searches his or her library for a card, reveals it, and puts it into his or her hand. Then you search your library for two cards and put them into your hand. Each player shuffles his or her library.

* Your opponents each find a card in whatever order they like. They may consult with each other during this process. You'll know what cards they've found before you search.

* You don't reveal the cards you search for.
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I Delight in Your Convulsions
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, each opponent loses 3 life. You gain life equal to the life lost this way.

* The amount of life a player can lose is not bounded by his or her life total. For example, if your opponents have 1, 2, and 10 life, respectively, when this scheme's ability resolves, each of them will lose 3 life. This brings their life totals to -2, -1, and 7 life, respectively. You gain 9 life. Then the first two opponents lose the game as a state-based action. (If the first two opponents concede before the triggered ability resolves, however, you'll gain only 3 life.)
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I Know All, I See All
Ongoing Scheme
(An ongoing scheme remains face up until it's abandoned.)
Untap all permanents you control during each opponent's untap step.
At the beginning of each end step, if three or more cards were put into your graveyard this turn from anywhere, abandon this scheme.

* As an opponent's untap step begins, if you control this face-up scheme card, all your permanents untap during that untap step. You have no choice about what untaps. Those permanents untap at the same time as the active players' permanents.

* Since your opponents take a shared team turn, they all have the same untap step. Your permanents untap just once during that step, no matter how many opponents you have.

* During an opponent's untap step, effects that would otherwise cause your permanents to stay tapped don't apply because they apply only during *your* untap step. For example, if you control a Deep-Slumber Titan (a creature that says "Deep-Slumber Titan doesn't untap during your untap step"), you untap Deep-Slumber Titan during each opponent's untap step.

* Controlling more than one face-up I Know All, I See All card is redundant. You can't untap your permanents more than once in a single untap step.

* The last ability won't trigger at all unless, as an end step starts, three or more cards have already been put into your graveyard that turn. Those cards don't still need to be in your graveyard at that time.

* The last ability of this scheme counts the number of cards put into your graveyard over the course of the entire turn, even if it wasn't face up the whole time. Specifically, during the turn you set this scheme in motion, its last ability will count cards that were put into your graveyard during your upkeep or draw step.

* The last ability doesn't count tokens that were put into your graveyard from the battlefield, because they're not cards. The same is true for copies of spells that were put into your graveyard when they resolved or were countered.
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Ignite the Cloneforge!
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, put a token onto the battlefield that's a copy of target permanent an opponent controls.

* You can target any permanent an opponent controls, not just a creature.

* The token that's put onto the battlefield copies exactly what's printed on the targeted permanent (unless that permanent is copying something else or it's a token; see below). It doesn't copy whether that permanent is tapped or untapped, whether it has any counters on it or Auras attached to it, or whether it's been affected by any noncopy effects that changed its power, toughness, types, color, or so on.

* If the targeted permanent is copying something else when the ability resolves (for example, if it's a Clone), then the token enters the battlefield as a copy of whatever that permanent is copying.

* If the targeted permanent is a token, the new token copies the characteristics of the original token as stated by the effect that put it onto the battlefield.

* If the targeted permanent has {X} in its mana cost (such as Protean Hydra), X is considered to be zero.

* Any enters-the-battlefield abilities of the targeted permanent will trigger when the token is put onto the battlefield. Any "as [this permanent] enters the battlefield" or "[this permanent] enters the battlefield with" abilities of that permanent will also work.

* If the targeted permanent leaves the battlefield before the ability resolves, the ability is countered. You don't get a token.

* If the targeted permanent is legendary or is a planeswalker, that permanent and the token will both be put into the graveyard as a state-based action. You don't get a chance to activate any of the token's abilities.

* If the targeted permanent is an Aura, you choose a legal permanent, player, or other card for the token to enchant as it enters the battlefield. A permanent you choose must be able to be enchanted by the token. (For example, if the Aura it's copying is red and has "enchant creature," the permanent must be a creature, and it can't have protection from red.) Since the token Aura wasn't cast as a spell, it doesn't target what it will enchant; you may choose something that has shroud, for example. As the ability resolves, no player can respond between the time you choose what the token will enchant and the time it enters the battlefield. If you can't choose something for the token to enchant, it enters the battlefield unattached, then is put into your graveyard as a state-based action.
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Into the Earthen Maw
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, exile up to one target creature with flying, up to one target creature without flying, and all cards from up to one target opponent's graveyard.

* You may choose zero, one, two, or three targets.
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Introductions Are in Order
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, choose one — Search your library for a creature card, reveal it, put it into your hand, then shuffle your library; or you may put a creature card from your hand onto the battlefield.

* You choose this ability's mode as you put it on the stack.
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Mortal Flesh Is Weak
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, each opponent's life total becomes the lowest life total among your opponents.

* For a player's life total to become a certain number that's lower than his or her current life total, what actually happens is that the player loses the appropriate amount of life. For example, if the lowest life total among your opponents is 5 and another opponent has 12 life, this scheme's ability will cause that player to lose 7 life. Abilities that interact with life loss will interact with this effect accordingly.
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My Crushing Masterstroke
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, gain control of all nonland permanents your opponents control until end of turn. Untap those permanents. They gain haste until end of turn. Each of them attacks its owner this turn if able.

* Each of those permanents attacks its owner if able, not necessarily the player you gained control of it from.

* Any of those permanents that are creatures at the time your declare attackers step begins must attack its owner if able. This includes permanents that became creatures after you gained control of them, such as an animated Chimeric Staff. Any of those permanents that aren't creatures at that time can't attack.

* If, during your declare attackers step, one of the creatures you gained control of this way is tapped or is affected by a spell or ability that says it can't attack, then it doesn't attack. If there's a cost associated with having that creature attack, you aren't forced to pay that cost, so it doesn't have to attack in that case either.

* If one of those creatures can't attack its owner that turn due to a spell or ability (such as Chronomantic Escape), you may have it attack another player, attack a planeswalker an opponent controls, or not attack at all. If there's a cost with having that creature attack its owner, you aren't forced to pay that cost, so you may have it attack another player, attack a planeswalker an opponent controls, or not attack at all.

* If there are multiple combat phases that turn, each of those permanents must attack its owner only in the first one in which it's able to.
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My Genius Knows No Bounds
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, you may pay {X}. If you do, you gain X life and draw X cards.

* As the ability resolves, you choose a value for X and decide whether to pay {X}. If you do decide to pay {X}, it's too late for any player to respond since the ability is already in the midst of resolving.
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My Undead Horde Awakens
Ongoing Scheme
(An ongoing scheme remains face up until it's abandoned.)
At the beginning of your end step, you may put target creature card from an opponent's graveyard onto the battlefield under your control.
When a creature put onto the battlefield with this scheme is put into a graveyard, abandon this scheme.

* You put a creature card on the battlefield this way during the end step of each of your turns. As soon as any one of those creatures is put back into a graveyard for any reason, this scheme is abandoned.

* When this scheme is abandoned, nothing happens to the rest of the creatures that were put onto the battlefield with it. They simply remain on the battlefield.
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My Wish Is Your Command
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, each opponent reveals his or her hand. You may choose a noncreature, nonland card revealed this way and cast it without paying its mana cost.

* You choose a total of one card, and that card can't be a creature or a land.

* If you choose a card, you cast it as part of the resolution of this ability. Timing restrictions based on the card's type are ignored. Other restrictions are not (such as "Cast [this card] only during your end step").

* If you choose a card you can't cast (because there are no legal targets for the spell, for example), nothing happens to it. It remains in its owner's hand.

* If you cast a card "without paying its mana cost," the value of any X in the card's mana cost must be 0. You can't pay any alternative costs for that card. On the other hand, if the card has optional additional costs (such as kicker or replicate), you may pay those when you cast the card. If the card has mandatory additional costs (such as Fling does), you must pay those when you cast the card.
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Nature Demands an Offering
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, target opponent chooses a creature you don't control and puts it on top of its owner's library, then repeats this process for an artifact, an enchantment, and a land. Then the owner of each permanent chosen this way shuffles his or her library.

* The targeted opponent may choose a creature he or she controls, or may choose a creature one of your other opponents controls. The same is true for each of the other permanent types listed.

* The four permanents are put on top of their owners' libraries in sequence. That means that a single artifact creature, for example, can't be chosen as both the creature and as the artifact.

* If there are no applicable choices for one of the permanent types, it's simply skipped. The process is still repeated for the other listed permanent types.

* If a player owns multiple permanents chosen this way, that player shuffles his or her library just once.

* The owner of a token permanent chosen this way still shuffles his or her library, even though the token ceases to exist.

* If one of the chosen permanents is controlled by an opponent but owned by you, you'll wind up shuffling your library.
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Nature Shields Its Own
Ongoing Scheme
(An ongoing scheme remains face up until it's abandoned.)
Whenever a creature attacks and isn't blocked, if you're the defending player, put a 0/1 green Plant creature token onto the battlefield blocking that creature.
When four or more creatures attack you, abandon this scheme at end of combat.

* You're the defending player if a creature is attacking you or a planeswalker you control.

* For each unblocked creature attacking you, you must put a Plant token onto the battlefield blocking it, even if you don't want to.

* The Plant token blocks the attacking creature even if the block couldn't legally be declared (for example, if the attacking creature has flying).

* Putting a blocking creature onto the battlefield doesn't trigger "Whenever a creature blocks" abilities. It also won't check blocking restrictions, costs, or requirements.

* Putting a blocking creature onto the battlefield will trigger "When this creature becomes blocked by a creature" abilities. It will also trigger "When this creature becomes blocked" abilities in this case, because the attacking creature had not yet been blocked that combat.

* The last ability triggers only if four or more creatures were declared as attackers during your opponents' declare attackers step. Only creatures attacking you are counted; creatures attacking your planeswalkers are not. The creatures may be controlled by different players.
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Nothing Can Stop Me Now
Ongoing Scheme
(An ongoing scheme remains face up until it's abandoned.)
If a source an opponent controls would deal damage to you, prevent 1 of that damage.
At the beginning of each end step, if you've been dealt 5 or more damage this turn, abandon this scheme.

* The prevention effect prevents 1 damage from each source an opponent controls each time that source would deal damage to you. It prevents damage of any kind, not just combat damage.

* The prevention effect doesn't affect damage dealt directly to a planeswalker you control (such as combat damage). It can prevent noncombat damage that's redirected from you to a planeswalker you control if you apply this effect first.

* The effects from more than one of these schemes are cumulative.

* The last ability won't trigger at all unless, as an end step starts, you have already been dealt 5 or more damage that turn. It doesn't matter whether any of it was combat damage or not, nor does it matter who controlled the sources of that damage. (In other words, it will count damage dealt to you by sources you control.)
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Only Blood Ends Your Nightmares
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, each opponent sacrifices a creature. Then each opponent who didn't sacrifice a creature discards two cards.

* Each opponent who can sacrifice a creature must do so, and thus won't discard any cards. Each opponent who can't sacrifice a creature (either because he or she doesn't control any, or because he or she controls Tajuru Preserver) will wind up discarding two cards. Your opponents have no choice in the matter.
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Rotted Ones, Lay Siege
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, for each opponent, put a 2/2 black Zombie creature token onto the battlefield that attacks that player each combat if able.

* For each Zombie token you put onto the battlefield this way, make sure it's clear who its designated player is. A token's designated player won't change for the rest of the game.

* Each of these Zombies must attack its designated player, not a planeswalker that player controls.

* If, during your declare attackers step, one of these Zombies is tapped or is affected by a spell or ability that says it can't attack, then it doesn't attack. If there's a cost associated with having that creature attack, you aren't forced to pay that cost, so it doesn't have to attack in that case either.

* If one of these Zombies can't attack its designated player during any given turn (because that player has left the game, due to a spell or ability such as Chronomantic Escape, or because a player on the opposing team has gained control of it, for example), it may attack another player, attack a planeswalker an opponent controls, or not attack at all. If there's a cost with having that creature attack its designated player, you aren't forced to pay that cost, so it may attack another player, attack a planeswalker an opponent controls, or not attack at all.

* If there are multiple combat phases in a turn, each of these Zombies must attack its designated player in each of them that it's able to.
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Tooth, Claw, and Tail
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, destroy up to three target nonland permanents.

* You may choose zero, one, two, or three targets.
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Which of You Burns Brightest?
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, you may pay {X}. If you do, this scheme deals X damage to target opponent and each creature he or she controls.

* You choose the target opponent when the ability triggers. As the ability resolves, you choose a value for X and decide whether to pay {X}. If you do decide to pay {X}, it's too late for any player to respond since the ability is already in the midst of resolving.
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Your Puny Minds Cannot Fathom
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, draw four cards. You have no maximum hand size until your next turn.

* What your maximum hand size is (or whether you even have one) matters only during the cleanup step during the ending phase of your turn.

* The effect doesn't wear off until just before your next untap step (even if an effect will cause that untap step to be skipped). Effectively, that means it removes your maximum hand size just during the turn in which you set it in motion.

* If multiple effects modify your hand size, apply them in timestamp order. For example, if you put Null Profusion (an enchantment that says your maximum hand size is two) onto the battlefield and later set this scheme in motion, you'll have no maximum hand size until your next turn. However, if you set this scheme in motion and then put Null Profusion onto the battlefield that turn, your maximum hand size would be two.
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Your Will Is Not Your Own
Scheme
When you set this scheme in motion, gain control of target creature an opponent controls until end of turn. Untap that creature. It gets +3/+3 and gains haste and trample until end of turn.

* You may target any creature an opponent controls, even one that's already untapped.
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