What does your weapon say about you?

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I was trying to come up with something to have carved into the shaft of my barbarian's halberd when I started to think about how personal some weapons are to the character who wields them. The first example that comes to mind is Drizzt and his scimitars, or Wulfgar and Aegis-Fang. I find that most of the characters I make have stories behind their weapons too.

So I figured I'd see what everyone else had, as far as weapons that define your characters.
I was trying to come up with something to have carved into the shaft of my barbarian's halberd when I started to think about how personal some weapons are to the character who wields them. The first example that comes to mind is Drizzt and his scimitars, or Wulfgar and Aegis-Fang. I find that most of the characters I make have stories behind their weapons too.

So I figured I'd see what everyone else had, as far as weapons that define your characters.

Well,  its not a weapon, but one of my group has a magic missle nicknamed "Dragon Bane" With that spell, he has killed two adult dragons in 3ed and a young adult in 4ed. It fits his character, blast first, intimidate later.
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One of my characters has two Scimitars collectively known as engel bana they got this name when he fought an angel in single combat and slaughtered it. Thus why they carry the firey feathers attached to the hilts of each. Once per encounter he can use those feathers to ignite his blades giving him a +2 to attack and +d6 to damage.
Heh, I like that. I had a warlock character for a little while who's eldritch blast came in the form of black lightening, and when he got angry, his hands would spark up. He was very much a "blast first, ask questions later" type of character. Fortunately, he was tempered a bit by a dragonborn ranger who had a much more level head. she was just about the only one who could talk sense into him.
The weapon I mentioned when I started this thread is a halberd that was given to my character by his mentor and teacher. It had been in Darian's (The mentor) family for generations, and with no children of his own, he passed it onto my character. Carved into the hilt of the halberd in draconic runes is "Fear not my blade, fear the strength behind it." My character and his mentor were both followers of Kord and Bahamut, so inner strength is kind of their thing. I'm thinking it will have some sort of radiant or fire damage enchant, but I haven't fully decided yet. Either way, the weapon will be very dear to the character.
I like what you've got. I've already got what I'm going to put on my Swordmage's blade, but I'm not sure what kind of blade it will be. He's going to be a Genasi with his blade lined with grooves emulating his szuldar, and by attuning to the blade said szuldar are charged with the same elemental power running through him.
I like what you've got. I've already got what I'm going to put on my Swordmage's blade, but I'm not sure what kind of blade it will be. He's going to be a Genasi with his blade lined with grooves emulating his szuldar, and by attuning to the blade said szuldar are charged with the same elemental power running through him.


Wow, that is EXCELLENT! I love that idea. Making the blade, literally, one with your character. I've always been fond of scimitars, but a longsword or broadsword would be good choices too. Kind of depends on the character. If he is all finesse and out maneuvering, I would go with the lighter blades. If he's more of a power fighter, relying on strength as much as his skill, then the extra weight of the broadsword would fit well. I suppose his element would play a part as well.  
I like how in 4e it really made keeping the same weapon easier.  With enchant weapon and transfer enchantment you can keep the same 'physical' weapon from 1st to 30th if you so choose.

Currently have a character like that.  Rolled up a 1st level character, an Ardent and decided to go with an Executioner's Axe from the adventurer's vault.   A rather strange and unwieldly weapon, certainly not something particularly meant for combat.  So I had to ask myself why he would weild it.  I decided that as part of his backstory he was put on the headsman's block.  Working with the DM and the other players we decided that my character joined with the others when a pair of them on a completely unrelated adventure ended up interupting my execution and saving my life.  I carry the headsman's axe that was meant for my neck...  and I'm always going to carry that thing. 

It may be enchanted now and again, becoming 'different weapons' but it will always be that axe.
Aesop had it right 2,500 years ago, "By endeavoring to please everyone, he had pleased no one, and lost his ass in the bargain".
I had a one-shot game Kobold Brawler Fighter in Scalemail with a +1 Vicious Spiked Gauntlet. The gauntlet was a tinkered skull of a Sand Dragon Wyrmling that he had slayed. The skull was remodified with magic and iron on the inside of the skull to keep it from breaking, or so he was told by the Blacksmith who forged it. He nicknamed his weapon "Snapjaw" as whenever he would grab somebody with this Gauntlet, the mouth on the gauntlet would lock down onto his prey quickly.
I like how in 4e it really made keeping the same weapon easier.  With enchant weapon and transfer enchantment you can keep the same 'physical' weapon from 1st to 30th if you so choose.


I actually had a DM in 3.5 that worked a system similar to the 4e system.  It was so much better in the essence that you could augment your current magic items and build some backstory with it.
I like how in 4e it really made keeping the same weapon easier.  With enchant weapon and transfer enchantment you can keep the same 'physical' weapon from 1st to 30th if you so choose.


I really enjoy that about 4e too. In 3.X, I don't remember any "iconic" weapons. Meanwhile, nearly all of my 4e characters have a trademark or sorts. Whether we're talking about my fighter's dual broad sword with fire and ice enchantments respectively, (Gifts from a dwarfish smith whose life he saved early in the heroic teir.) or my halfling sorcerer who only cast lightening spells. (Funny story behind that...there was a bit of time travel involved and he played a rather CHARGED game of patty cake with himself. Bad punning aside, I'm totally serious. He played lightening patty cake with himself in an alternate time.)
I've got 2 that come to mind.

My Goliath Barbarian (Crunk) has a distance throwing hammer named "thanks". He was getting pummelled by 2 wizards while he was immobilized (couldn't save worth a damn!) and the reward was a 5th lvl item. This way, he says "thanks" every time he hits someone more than 1 square away

I've got a Ardent named Gertrude that is like 70 years old (and a human!) who wields a halberd. Obviously, an old lady wouldn't wield a halberd normally, so i re flavored her into an old farm lady who uses her trusty gardening hoe in combat.  It got some weird looks at the table, but DAMN is it hella fun to play
It started as just a way to make one weapon cooler, but now I actually like the design: my eladrin swordmage has a Thundering Longsword, whose blade splits in half like an elongated, razor-sharp tuning fork. I think I'm going to keep that design in each of his weapons for the future, and then he'll have legitimate reason to take the surname Bladesong: his sword clangs in F-sharp.

The original core books said that this was our game too. It doesn't feel like that anymore.

Sword - You like to slice things.
Axe - You like to chop things.
Spear - You like to stab things.
Hammer or mace - You like to smash things.

;)
It started as just a way to make one weapon cooler, but now I actually like the design: my eladrin swordmage has a Thundering Longsword, whose blade splits in half like an elongated, razor-sharp tuning fork. I think I'm going to keep that design in each of his weapons for the future, and then he'll have legitimate reason to take the surname Bladesong: his sword clangs in F-sharp.



I like this.
My Dragonborn Ardent/Warlord hybrid Art (short for Artemis) has a greatspear whose handle folds up to make it a shortsword for easy carrying and use in tight spaces. Mainly because she's very efficient and rather intelligent to boot. That, and it's awesome having a spear whose shaft just sort of slides into being with the press of a button.
Sword - You like to slice things.
Axe - You like to chop things.
Spear - You like to stab things.
Hammer or mace - You like to smash things.

;)

Couple adjustments:

Dagger - you like to stab things.
Spear - you like to poke holes in things.
Bow or crossbow - you like to poke holes in things way over there.

"The world does not work the way you have been taught it does. We are not real as such; we exist within The Story. Unfortunately for you, you have inherited a condition from your mother known as Primary Protagonist Syndrome, which means The Story is interested in you. It will find you, and if you are not ready for the narrative strands it will throw at you..." - from Footloose
   My Sorcerer once had a dagger that would guide him like a compass and speak to him. It was fun to roleplay.

...you will do as I say...
My current character Jonn Bastain (fighter/runepriest) has a +1 vicious greatsword named Queen's Judgement as he is a devout follower of the Raven Queen ( his faith brought about by his father). Rather than fear death and cast off fate he embraces them and strives to gain his deity's favor so that in death he may be rewarded. The blade is strong yet unique like my character.
In my LARP days I would name all my weapons, gave them some deeper attachment.
My Hand and a Half was Rightious Indignation
I had a hand axe called Diamond Cutter
a Marn  named Evil Shenanigans
a warhammer  called the Red Right Hand
My Dragonborn Ardent/Warlord hybrid Art (short for Artemis) has a greatspear whose handle folds up to make it a shortsword for easy carrying and use in tight spaces. Mainly because she's very efficient and rather intelligent to boot. That, and it's awesome having a spear whose shaft just sort of slides into being with the press of a button.


I really like that idea. I was thinking of playing a beast master ranger who was sort of a sage looking character. Complete with well worn robes (over the armor of course) and a quarterstaff to go with the look of a wizened wanderer. The quarterstaff, however, is actually the business part of the bow, and when it's activation word is spoken the bow threads itself in the user's hands. I haven't figured out how to work in a quiver that wouldn't look suspicious with the whole wanderer get up. If anyone has any ideas, let me know.
You could always MC artificer, PP Self-Forged, and use an armbow. No staff-bow needed, and armbows supply thier own ammunition. Just make use your robes cover the metal bits. ;)
You could always MC artificer, PP Self-Forged, and use an armbow. No staff-bow needed, and armbows supply thier own ammunition. Just make use your robes cover the metal bits. ;)


That's a great idea, and I like the idea of his weapon being part of him physically, but I'm thinking of a way to make it work straight out of the gate(RE: Level 1). That, and artificer/self forged don't quite mesh with the character I have in mind. Granted, I don't have much fleshed out yet, but the early vision I have of him doesn't really cast him as a character who is concerned with the arcane properties of mundane and magical objects. The MC/PP combo give perfect flavor, but MCing and PP's are big character investments I'm not willing to make just for flavor's sake. 

I'm thinking perhaps a large bundle of scrolls secured to his back could disguise a quiver. 9 of 10 would be actual scrolls, but the tenth would house several arrows? I'm not crazy about it, but it could work if nothing better comes along. 
You could always MC artificer, PP Self-Forged, and use an armbow. No staff-bow needed, and armbows supply thier own ammunition. Just make use your robes cover the metal bits. ;)




Also take a Disembodied Hand familiar cuz that's how we roll.

When I try to make a weapon unique to a character, I think of what the character's ambitions are, and how he'd use a weapon for that purpose. For example, a barbarian (or better yet, a barbarian/ranger hybrid) might be a defender of his tribe, and a hunter during peace times, so he might integrate the bones of his ancestors and greatest trophy kills. Definitely captures the savagery of Barbarians, but also the essence of primal characters.

The coolest thing I ever did was have an Artificer turn the Lord of Blades into a Vorpal Glaive. Could talk and everything. Awesome.





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The coolest thing I ever did was have an Artificer turn the Lord of Blades into a Vorpal Glaive. Could talk and everything. Awesome.








You win one (1) internet.


I really like that idea. I was thinking of playing a beast master ranger who was sort of a sage looking character. Complete with well worn robes (over the armor of course) and a quarterstaff to go with the look of a wizened wanderer. The quarterstaff, however, is actually the business part of the bow, and when it's activation word is spoken the bow threads itself in the user's hands. I haven't figured out how to work in a quiver that wouldn't look suspicious with the whole wanderer get up. If anyone has any ideas, let me know.



Not sure what design your sage's robes are but here goes:

Your character's robes have what look like enticing geometric patterns, horrifically to those who are smart enough to analyze the designs spot the myriad of arrows stitched into your clothing. Displayed as lines within the patterns adorning your robe, they are the very reflection of 'cannot see the forest for the trees'. It is in fact very possible that all the designs are nothing more than arrows, merely hidden far too professionally to be noticed as some of the other arrows have been.

For a simple brown robe, your arrows are wooden, no steel tips, no designs to let people know they have been stitched in possibly the hundreds onto the skin of the robe, looking exactly like any section of the robe.
I like how in 4e it really made keeping the same weapon easier.  With enchant weapon and transfer enchantment you can keep the same 'physical' weapon from 1st to 30th if you so choose.



My bard is doing that with her songblade. It was a gift from a wealthy lover, and she's v. attached to both of them.
Well, I've had a lightning greataxe +4 since level 1...

My girlfriend was DMing and she had us wandering around her NPC's store when Thor-Axe noticed it. I pretty much demanded it and she said I could have it on the sole condition that I went on this quest for her. Long story short, it's become one of the defining symbols for my charrie. Thor-Axe's first quest as an adventurer since failing his tribe and he's had it ever since. Slayed countless monsters with it. I pretty much redid my whole charrie around it! Started off as a firebreathing rageblood barbarian, now he's a lightning breath thaneborn who's trying to redeem hisself (both as a charrie and as a player.)

And in the next session, I'm going to see if I can include the fact that a wolverine's been forged onto it. (Mind you, it's a wolverine not because of X-men but purely because it's the biggest mustelid ((I love ferrets)), they're smart, and they're very ferocious.)
My current character, John d'Orien(Revenant(Genasi) Swordmage), has a sword that is pretty much a crystalization of his memories, soul, or something to that effect(I'm letting my DM decide on what exactly it is). John has no memories of his life prior to being found at the edge of the Mournland with his sword in hand. He doesn't know anything about the sword other than it greatly increases his ability to use teleportation magic(fluffwise he is incapable of using most of his powers without it) and that he is extremely uncomfortable without it being in reach. The description of the sword that I wrote before is below:

He carries an unusual looking longsword at his side. The pommel of the sword has the crest of House Orien imprinted into white gold. The rest of the handle appears to be made out of gold with streaks of a dark purple gemstone occasionally in it. The actual grip of the blade appears to be made entirely of the gemstone. The blade looks as though it was made of white gold with five streaks of different gemstones; one green, one red, one yellow, one blue, and one white; extending from the handle to the tip. The blade and handle both have writing in a mixture of draconic, celestial, and primordial. However, the writing seems to be pure nonsense and purely decorative. The blade has the mark of passage stamped into both sides of it. The most unusual quality of the sword is that all the parts of it blend together almost implying that it was forged as a single piece of metal rather than as several components.
My character for a campaign I'll soon be joining is going to be built around the idea that he's a professional interrogator. His weapons are a reflection of his thoughts on pain and misery:

The waraka blade, the short sword of a set of blades that includes the waraka dagger, waraka long sword and waraka 7 foot (two-handed) sword. These blades were made years ago by seven master weaponsmiths who were meticulous in their work, working together to notice even the tiniest fault in a blade and to have it instantly scrapped if it contained any, applying their own vast knowledge of tests for blades to make sure they were unrivaled in one specific aspect: cutting flesh. These blades produce the thinnest, but deepest cuts, painful to the touch, one certainly does not want a second cut after tasting the first.

The word waraka is arabic for paper (well, actual word would be CLOSEST to waraga, but I thought waraka sounded better). I was sitting around thinking about paper cuts and how people say the worst kind of pain is a paper cut, the sword's style is built around the concept of a paper cut, hence, the paper blade.

The Bi's olNaar is a blade crafted by an unknown swordsmith from recent age. The blade supposedly bursts into flame if ignited by even the smallest spark. The secret of the blade itself lies in the edge of the sword, being definable as a saw, though not noticeable if one does not look closely at the edge of the blade to notice the pattern. Every time the sword claims a victim, human fat and other ignitable body liquids get stored upon the blade and is what actually ignites to cause flames upon the sword.

The idea for the sword came from an anime I watched a while back, the idea seemed very befitting of my character's nature. The word bi's (pronunciation is not easily transferred to be honest) is arabic for bad/horrific fate, Naar is arabic for fire but also used for hell (the 'ol' prefix is only used if another word is used prior to this word, for instance ilnaar translates into 'the fire', olnaar translates into 'of fire' but specifically SOMETHING of fire, just that you need to specify it). Translation would be horrible fate of hell (mind you, this is like japanese words, translated they sound lame, but in their original japanese they sound normal) but I've no intention of translating the name lest the DM make me do some cheesy anime move every time my character uses his sword.
My duelist/swashbuckler from second edition found a simple rapier with an electric motif (Swooping arcs formed the basket, the blue blade flashed when he attacked) which he named Arc Falsh but as he weilded it it took on lightning based powers and a part of his own personality.  In 3rd ed, Arc Flash became Arcspire and the two became more "teammates" than weilder and weapon and was stated as a legacy weapon.  For a time, his essence was fused with a Necromancer from my evil game as the two tried to stop the destruction of the world.  The Mancer had an equally potent scythe named Asteroth and when we fused, so did the weapons into Arcsteroth (a heavy curved blade angled forward on a sword hilt, wrapped in necrotic blue lightning) this lead to the play-out of 3rd and the vanishing of the characters.  In 4th we just returned the two (Now separated again) and I chose to remake as a hybrid Rog/storm Sor with all feats and powers dedicated to show him using his legacy abilities through Arcspire.  Its worked out really well and Arcspire holds a fearsome reputation on the world once again.
One of my characters (a halfling ranger, mc rogue) found a nice lifedrinker scimitar he really liked, although it was a bit unwieldy for his taste. Rather than simply just transferring the enhancement, my DM let me pull the old 13th warrior trick and grind it down to a shortsword for the same cost. We jokingly handwaved the cost as the task wearing out a fair number of grindstones... ;)

Last session I pilfered a large greatsword off an oni mage. I sure hope grindstones are on sale in the next town we hit, cos I need a new dagger. ;)

 My somewhat mentally-unbalanced Unaligned ranger Molly Borden carries a number of handaxes: one in her left boot, one hidden in the small of her back, and five in a pair of specially-made quick-draw holsters - Along the front of each leg, a wide piece of thick leather stretches from the front of her belt to mid-thigh, strapped down like a gunfighter's holsters. There are three thick loops sewn to the leather pad on each leg, and each contains one of her perfectly balanced, perfectly matched handaxes. All except for one... The top loop on her right leg. In that loop hangs an ordinary wood-chopping hatchet, of the sort found in every household in every village. The same hatchet which Molly used to kill her parents when she was thirteen...
Though all of her axes appear almost obsessively clean and polished, anyone who looks closely at her hatchet will notice a few tiny dark spots in the crevices or on the blade, as though the gore of old battles hadn't quite been cleaned well enough and discolored the metal. And old battles the axe has seen - the hatchet was originally a waraxe, an evil weapon forged in the fires of malevolent intent and used to commit bloody murder and mayhem for centuries before being reforged into a simple woodcutter's axe six generations ago by one of Molly's ancestors, and reforged again into a hatchet by that man's daughter. Among the few tiny bloodstains on the weapon lie those of several of Molly's ancestors, slain with the hatchet by their own kin, a family for whom misfortune, madness and murder have become a family legacy and, as it is often rumored, possibly an actual family curse.

I've yet to actually decide what sort of magic weapon it actually is, since A.) Molly's only gotten to 4th level and hasn't picked up a magic weapon yet, and B.) I intentionally wrote a DM choice into Molly's background, never quite determining whether or not the madness and tragedy of Molly's family history is actually a direct result of the presence of some "evil" cursed weapon or simply a family history of mental illness and abuse. It could be both - perhaps it was an intelligent weapon that simply found a family predisposed to the sort of behavior it preferred to encourage.






The Long Story


    "Elsie Borden took an axe
 And gave her mother forty whacks.
 And when she saw what she had done, 
 She gave her father forty-one..."

  A simple children's rhyme, sung while skipping rope, old as the city itself. An urban legend, an old wives' tale children tell to scare each other. Nothing more than a fable, surely?
  How soon they forget...

    Six generations ago, a bunch of local young men returned from the latest, largest campaign against the gnolls, and were welcomed as homecoming heroes. With them came a man named Harris Borden, a mercenary who carried a wicked-looking waraxe, brightly polished but with a few small spots where old blood improperly removed had stained the metal. They had come upon him alone in the midst of the last climactic battle, claiming to have been separated from his unit several days past and having taken the waraxe off the body of an enemy after losing his own weapon. The whole town celebrated their return for several days, and many weeks passed before those young men paid for a single drink or meal, constantly called upon to tell and retell their adventures in the war. Though Harris Borden was also welcomed as a hero and the young men he had fought with would tell grand tales of his bravery and ferocity in the final battle, Haris himself spoke only sparingly of his deeds during that skirmish and not at all of what had happened to his former mercenary unit, seeming to want to put it all behind him. It wasn't long before he married a local girl and settled down to run a small inn at the edge of town on one of the smaller trade roads. The wicked-looking war axe was reforged into a woodcutter's axe, and soon forgotten about by everyone in the town. A year later, Harris's wife gave birth to a daughter named Eloise, who quickly became known to all as "Elsie". 
Although it seemed that fortune had smiled on Harris Borden, who had a loving wife, a beautiful daughter and a successful business, things began to change over the next ten years. Always seen as a quiet, sombre man, Harris became withdrawn and close-lipped. He seemed to be crumbling under the weight of some unbearable burden, something that haunted him. Though speaking few words to the people of the town and leaving the operation of the inn to his wife, he would often sit in the main room of the inn conversing late into the night with travellers who had passed through the lands previously held by the gnolls, questioning them obsessively about their travels. Over time, the small trade route fell into disuse, replaced by a larger one that entered the town some distance away. Few people stayed at the inn anymore. It began to be whispered that Harris Borden had taken to drinking heavily and beating his wife. Though originally hailed as a hero, it was now whispered that Harris was an evil man.
Harris' only response was to drink more and say less, becoming violent whenever his deeds during the war were mentioned. Most people questioned whether he truly had ever been a hero during the war, as noone clearly remembered Harris ever telling an exciting tale of his battles.
    In point of fact, not only had Harris never actually mentioned which mercenary company he had previously fought with, but had also said nothing about which side his mercenary company had fought for. Nothing is known about the man called Harris Borden before he wandered out of the gnoll lands bearing a weapon apparently somehow tainted by evil. Whether Harris Borden was originally a good man brought down and corrupted by the influence of the axe he carried, or if he had always been an evil man, the true owner of that cursed tool of destruction, it was certain that he had become morally bankrupt and possibly mad by the time of his death: It was occasionally implied, although always in hushed whispers and quiet tones, that although he rarely touched his wife other than to beat her, Harris Borden possessed an unhealthy fascination for his lovely daughter Elsie.
 What was not whispered amongst the good people of the town, however, was another secret just as dark - Ten-year-old Elsie possessed an equally unhealthy fascination with her father's wood-cutting axe...
The butchered bodies of Harris Borden and his wife were found by a neighbor the next morning, and young Elsie was found outside in the yard seemingly near-catatonic in shock. There was no sign of the weapon used to kill Elsie's parents. Refusing to believe that such a sweet beautiful girl had murdered both her parents with an axe, everyone blamed the incident on the recent rise in raiding activity by the newly resurgent gnoll clans. The neighbor who found the bodies took over the operation of the family's inn and raised Elsie as his own child.
 Years later, after the incident was mostly forgotten, Elsie married a distant cousin (also named Borden) and took up the family innkeeping again. She bore her handsome new husband three sons. On the first anniversary of their wedding, Elsie presented her husband with a brand new hatchet of supperior quality and balance. Less than a year later, the man accidentally severed the tips of two fingers while chopping wood. When Elsie's youngest son was still in his teens, her husband died during the winter after a long bout with influenza. Elsie herself passed away two years later.
After Elsie's death, the inn managed to stay afloat financially for a few years but was closed down after her two oldest sons argued over the business and the second oldest split the skull of his older brother with the family hatchet. People began to whisper in the streets that the family was cursed. Her youngest son Harrison eventually married and raised a family, though tragedy continued to stalk the Borden clan. Two of his children died at a young age, and Elsie's only granddaughter Sarah eventually went mad. In each generation, there was always something - madness, murder, incest or illness... As the village had grown into first a large town and then a small city, nearly everyone had forgotten the fateful story of the Borden family and a number of tragedies and atrocities went completely unremarked upon, the "family curse" having long since since become a thing of fiction and the subject of nursury rhymes. Few in the Borden family themselves even realized that the hatchet still existed, passed down through the generations with other family heirlooms.
Molly Borden was thirteen when she killed her abusive father and mother, and the bodies were discovered by a neighbor who found Molly sitting nearby, soaked in blood and still clutching the family hatchet. One of the few aware of the so-called "Family Curse", as well as the rumors that Molly's parents may have been abusing her, the neighbor tossed the hatchet into the Borden family home and set fire to the building with the bodies of Molly's parents inside, in hopes of somehow ending the curse. The man told the city watch and others who came to fight the fire that it was an accident. Whether anyone actually believed the legends of a family curse or not, that Molly had murdered her parents, or that the fire was truly an accident, everyone present simply stood there watching as it burned to the ground, most making signs against evil and praying under their breath. Molly, the last of her family, was placed into the local orphanage.
 Molly got into a large number of fights in the orphanage, often protecting the smaller, weaker children and nearly killing a number of older children who tried to touch her. Shunned by the other children and feared by the adults, Molly sometimes simply wandered off for days at a time, unbeknownst to her nominal caretakers often spending hours walking around the former site of her childhood home. Few noticed when she came and went, and nobody cared - they were happy to see the back of her when she left. At the age of nineteen Molly one day packed up her few possessions and simply walked away from the entire city. Several seasons later, a crotchety and cantankerous old ranger found her living half wild in the woods on the edge of the gnoll territories, carefully braiding strips of what appeared to be gnoll pelt onto the end of a "trophy rope" made from strips of at least a dozen other gnoll pelts.

About Molly
 
   Molly started out as a 4E translation of a 3.5 character I had named Hatchet, a handaxe-using ranger/fighter spec'd out as a TWF combat beast. I only ever got to play him in Neverwinter Nights, though. For some reason, during the translation to 4E the character just seemed to take on a more female feel, but I'd never really come up with a backstory for the character since it was mainly a mechanical concept build - I just named the original character Hatchet cuz it was a cool thematic name, y'know?. However, an interesting confluence of events happened a short while later - I was reading a post on the forums about character backgrounds and somebody posted a link to an article about the Lizzie Borden story (As a New Englander and a bit of a student of the area's darker history, I was of course familiar with it) so I followed the link. As I was reading it, the online radio station I was listening to just happened to play Molly Hatchet's "Fall Of The Peacemakers". Something about the lyrics, especially the line about "stop the madness" kind of struck a chord in my brain.
 Suddenly, "Hatchet" had morphed into "Molly Borden". And the story of Lizzie Borden became a family legacy of madness and misfortune that may or may not be a "family curse" brought on by the possession of an axe tainted by evil...


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I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...

And another one for (cross)bows: You like turning bad things into pincushions.