5/04/2010 LI: "Whoever Plays Their Bomb First ..."

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This thread is for discussion of this week's Limited Information, which goes live Tuesday morning on magicthegathering.com.
On the subject of Narcolepsy:

If I even thought I might be in blue, I would be quite happy to first pick this card.  This card is a blue Pacifism, in a format and color where that effect is even more valuable than it was in M10.  And I would be more than happy to first pick a Pacifism in M10.  In this format, I suppose one could make a case for picking See Beyond, Regress, or either of the two blue common levelers over Narcolepsy, but I'd much rather grab the two-mana spell that permanently shuts down totem armor, levelers, and Eldrazi alike.
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Virulent Swipe is an excellent way to deal with a bomb. I suppose that is a little obivious though. 
Another solid article, which is why Steve is  the best writer in wizards . . .

I agree on all points:

Guard Duty is a card I initially dismissed, but I think you're right that it has good utility.  
Oust and Corpsehatch are obviously strong, no need to elaborate there.
I think you underestimated Vendetta a bit, even though you noted it is good.  I think it is very, very good.  It was my best spell all prerelease and I was playing with a Corpsehatch.  It is better than Corpsehatch.  Amazing answer to Eldrazi and I don't think you will run into many decks aggressive enough to make the lifeloss truly significant. 
I also think that Smite is a bit underestimated.  You are going to have blockers, plain and simple, especially with all of the tokens running around.  Even without tokens, you likely have a creature, be it a wall or a smaller creature that you wouldn't have attacked with anyway.  Yes, it can be awkward if you are trying to kill an early creature before you have a blocker down, but it this format you aren't going to generally need it too early anyway.  It is one mana removal, in white, that destroys any size creature.  I think it is first pickable.
As to Narcolepsy, I think it is also first pickable.  It is similar in purpose to Pacifism, but is slightly better.  And in blue.  I think blue has a lot of really powerful utility cards in the set so a removal spell like this is welcome.  In such a slow format, evasion becomes even more important, hence white and blue being better than normal.  And this is a top notch removal spell in a powerful color.
As far as the counters go, I think you are right in saying that most of them are decent to barely playable.  I played both with and against them in the prerelease and they were exactly what you might expect of them, which is that they are barely playable.  That said, blue is a fairly deep color, and if you can pick these up post pick 9 then I think they are worth it.  I think they are likely going to be your 22 card so picking them late may be a bargain.
Perish the Thought is underwhelming and probably also is a 22nd type card.
Virulent Swipe is an excellent way to deal with a bomb. I suppose that is a little obivious though. 



Obvious but also true.  I think Virulent Swipe will quickly be regarded as a top three pick type card.  No joke.  It is an amazing combat trick, turning a wall or a token into an Eldrazi killer.  Even if your opponent doesn't have Eldrazi, it can lead to 4 dmg for 1 mana, and makes it so your opponent won't want to block your creature.  It is excellent in any context. 

I think that it also bears mentioning that it seems most of the best removal spells are in white.  White tends to be awesome in limited when it has good removal, because it does so many other things well.
Another solid article, which is why Steve is  the best writer in wizards . . .





With that, I have to say, Im not sure Im going to draft this set much.  That makes me sad, but my wallet will be happy.
[insert "blue sucks now" rant here]

Really, I got nuthin.

I definitely agree with the main argument of this article, which is that, in most cases, the fact that you're losing to a bomb is the result of either misplaying your removal during the gameplay or undervaluing removal during a draft. Even in Rise of the Eldrazi, a set that actively encourages players to cast high-cost, swingy creatures, there are multiple common and uncommon answers to these creatures.

Another strategy you can employ to get around the bomb cards is to improve your draw. Sea Gate Oracle, See Beyond, Wall of Omens and survival cache can enable you to dig through your deck quickly and set up the offense or defense you need to win the game. Transversely, there are plenty of aggressive strategies still within the format.
See Beyond definitely has my vote for the most likely mediocre blue draw to inexplicably get restricted in Vintage next.
While I agree that Oust has a place in many decks, in limited it can be a liability, especially against red.

Last week at FNM, my opponent ousted my opponent Oust ed my Ulamog's Crusher when he was on 8 life.

I was holding Explosive Revelation. GG.


Dan
For those that have played the format, how easy is it to leave up mana for stuff like combat tricks and counterspells without giving away massive tells when you have levelers in your deck?  It would seem that all your excess mana would get diverted into leveling up your guys, and if you ever "accidentally" forgot to level, your opponent would be like, "Uhhhhhh.... YES I'M SURE THAT 4 MANA YOU HAVE OPEN COULD NOT POSSIBLY BE LAY BARE NO SIR!"
Nice article. I would say that narcolepsy is a first pick in this format. In many scenarios it's a cheap removal spell that can answer bombs, and in rise limited answering bombs is often the key to victory. In addition several cards in the format that get rid of it like regress or counters are also used to delay or deal with bombs, so having them used on narcolepsy means your opponent has less answers to your own eldrazi spells.

For those that have played the format, how easy is it to leave up mana for stuff like combat tricks and counterspells without giving away massive tells when you have levelers in your deck?  It would seem that all your excess mana would get diverted into leveling up your guys, and if you ever "accidentally" forgot to level, your opponent would be like, "Uhhhhhh.... YES I'M SURE THAT 4 MANA YOU HAVE OPEN COULD NOT POSSIBLY BE LAY BARE NO SIR!"


It can be tricky, but it's certainly doable if you pay attention to how your opponent plays. Sometimes you can assume they won't notice, sometimes you can pretend you forgot and occasionally your opponent will always assume you have a trick when you don't level up, which is still something that you can use against them. Also in many scenarios like this in which the game is still close they have to play their bomb anyway because they'll lose if the board state doesn't change. If the board state is even but they have something awesome to play next turn then the game wasn't as close as it appears at first glance.
[insert "blue sucks now" rant here]

Really, I got nuthin.



Que? Narcolepsy is more than green got. No Lignify whatsoever =(

For those that have played the format, how easy is it to leave up mana for stuff like combat tricks and counterspells without giving away massive tells when you have levelers in your deck?  It would seem that all your excess mana would get diverted into leveling up your guys, and if you ever "accidentally" forgot to level, your opponent would be like, "Uhhhhhh.... YES I'M SURE THAT 4 MANA YOU HAVE OPEN COULD NOT POSSIBLY BE LAY BARE NO SIR!"



Reasonable easy. Many of the common & uncommon levelers cost 3 to level, so when you have 1 or 2 spare mana open that says nothing =)
Another good article from Steve. He is certainly correct that many times it is within the player's gift to make the judgment call about when to play (or draft) removal.

Yet the title of the of the article does strike a truth. Just because it is sometimes within your gift, doesn't mean it is always so. And, more relevantly, I think bombs are bombier now than they used to be now that rarity-creep has become de rigeur.

A number of players at my local club have been playing for years, and I think are a good measure of things. Whilst the limited game is arguably much more thoughtful than in years gone by, there have been a lot more games where "first to bomb" has been the deciding factor in a way that isn't terribly fun to play around. Maybe its just because I enjoy games with balance and more subtlety than "swing with eldrazi = win".

I would have been more interested if the article had commented on what some would say is an increase in bombiness in the limited environment, and whether that increase is a good thing, but as I say a good article as always.
So, if you manage to get a high pick quality removal card, or a few other cards that kinda sorta maybe deal with it and are admittedly limited in use and may not normally make a player's deck, and as long as you are in one of those colors AND you sit there and nurse one of these cards and not use them on anything else that may be beating your face, THEN MAYBE you can deal if your opponent drops an Eldrazi?

Thanks Steve, you've really opened my eyes about how much my whining about this set was wrong. Undecided
So, if you manage to get a high pick quality removal card, or a few other cards that kinda sorta maybe deal with it and are admittedly limited in use and may not normally make a player's deck, and as long as you are in one of those colors AND you sit there and nurse one of these cards and not use them on anything else that may be beating your face, THEN MAYBE you can deal if your opponent drops an Eldrazi?

Thanks Steve, you've really opened my eyes about how much my whining about this set was wrong. Undecided

Well, he is right. Limited has never really been "who ever lays there bomb first" and it still isn't. Ofcourse I don't understand how he gets this idea that people say that about every limited format. I never heard that before in my life until Eldrazi came out. But....

Yeah, I know...

Pretty much all of the writers at wizards don't know what they are talking about or are total douchbags.

- Mike Flores has made a ton of innacurate or flat out wrong statements

- Steve in this article because he somehow thinks that everyone will always have good enough luck to always draw removal or get passed removal. He acts like there is no luck involved in magic.

- Maro, because he is Maro, and his constant apple fanboyism. NO ONE CARES ABOUT HOW MUCH YOU USE YOUR iPHONE!!!!

- Adam, because all he does is subtly suggest that blue is terrible overpowered and unfun.  

The only one I don't find to be a douch is the guy that writes Savor the Flavor.
So, if you manage to get a high pick quality removal card, or a few other cards that kinda sorta maybe deal with it and are admittedly limited in use and may not normally make a player's deck, and as long as you are in one of those colors AND you sit there and nurse one of these cards and not use them on anything else that may be beating your face, THEN MAYBE you can deal if your opponent drops an Eldrazi?

Thanks Steve, you've really opened my eyes about how much my whining about this set was wrong. Undecided

Well, he is right. Limited has never really been "who ever lays there bomb first" and it still isn't. Ofcourse I don't understand how he gets this idea that people say that about every limited format. I never heard that before in my life until Eldrazi came out. But....




I first started hearing it with M10. Shards required you to draft mana fixing in many cases a lot higher than you normally would, because random artifact in your shard might not be around again.

For some reason I thought this would be an analysis of how wizards messed up and made yet another set that just revolves around droping your bomb first. Nobody likes to get beat because they had inferior cards. Sure I could get out my Ulamog's Crusher a turn earlier than your Kozilek but that might not help me if I don't get a couple of solid hits in.

I know most people missed where he said that removing that 4/4 that was beating face on you may still have been the right choice. It just seems to me that the way this set was designed everyone is playing the same deck just some card pools are stronger.

I was pretty disappointed that the Article didn't start with "Wins."

I wouldn't say there's a lack of removal in the suites of RotE. In fact, RotE is a pretty fun limited format to play with. A unique experience you probably won't get from other sets. Given RotE limited is only staying for like 3 months or so before M11, why complain?

Which reminds me, I'd better continue thinking how to complete that foil Colorless Eldrazi collection of mine when I've got the time. Plenty of folks in my area are also looking for them.
Just to add my own anecdotal experience to the discussion (and I understand the plural of anecdote is not 'data'), I've swept multiple drafts in the format with absolutely no rares in my drafted cards, and curves that stop at 5 (though sometimes with a good late-game sink like Artisan).
Being the first one to play a bomb is one way to win. But overlooking the other ways to win is indeed a way to lose.

There are ways to stop one's opponent's bomb... so, indeed, as the article notes, if one's strategy depends on getting one bomb out, and it fizzles, then one is helpless against one's opponent's bomb.

On the other hand, if one's opponent is able to get a legendary Eldrazi out on turn 3, and this would apply more to Constructed than to Limited, losing to that is not really something that can be blamed on a failure to emphasize counters and removal enough in one's deck.

The article also notes the other important thing to do: make every turn count instead of just waiting to play your own bomb later on.

It was noted, though, in another article, that this set was designed to ensure the big Eldrazi creatures played a prominent role. So just applying conventional Magic principles without tempering them to the more difficult path they face in this set doesn't work either. Getting one's bomb out first may not be everything, but in this set, it's more than it has been in other sets.

Coming up with weird ideas to make everyone happy since 2008!

 

I have now started a blog as an appropriate place to put my crazy ideas.

Narcolepsy is certainly a first-pick quality card. I'd go as far as saying it is one of the best removal spells in the format. The only kind of creature it doesn't completely deal with are the ones with abilities that don't need the creature to be in combat to be useful. Granted, there are a number of these (mainly the invokers at common), but otherwise Narcolepsy deals with the vast majority of direct threats. I'd pick Corpsehatch and Vendetta higher, since they deal with every kind of threat except black ones. I'd also pick Dawnglare Invoker, the all-out best common, above all these, but that's it except for bomb uncommons and rares, I think.

So, if you manage to get a high pick quality removal card, or a few other cards that kinda sorta maybe deal with it and are admittedly limited in use and may not normally make a player's deck, and as long as you are in one of those colors AND you sit there and nurse one of these cards and not use them on anything else that may be beating your face, THEN MAYBE you can deal if your opponent drops an Eldrazi?

Thanks Steve, you've really opened my eyes about how much my whining about this set was wrong. Undecided

It seems to me you're either a troll or you have strong preconceived ideas about the format that you are too stubborn to reevaluate, no matter what people, even Limited experts, tell you. I don't expect to be able to change that in your case, but for those who might lean towards thinking that way and are scared to try the format for that reason, know this : every color has mutiple good ways to efficiently deal with the Eldrazi (except Emrakul and Ulamog which are Mythic and hella hard to cast). The average draft deck has either multiple removal spells for them, or, in the case of red-green decks, has more of them and more ways to cast them faster, and is able to best the opponent's Eldrazi in combat. That doesn't mean Eldrazi don't win games, otherwise no one would be willing to pay their hefty mana costs, but the fact is that the threat they represent, the answers to them and the other types of threats available besides them are all very well balanced.

Eldrazi decks, in fact, are not the acknowledged best draft archetypes in the format. Blue and white leveler/evasion decks are. Why? They have the most cheap answers to fatties and can ignore most blockers.  To beat blue/white, an Eldrazi deck generally needs to play red for a good amount of burn for the small evasive threats, otherwise blue/white is most often favored.

I've played three sealed events and four drafts so far, and I've been able to do good with a variety of strategies. The number of games won on the spot by one unanswered Eldrazi were actually pretty rare. I find this format incredibly fun. The only thing that bugs me about it is the relatively low number of valuable rares, but that's not enough for me to skip on the fun of playing the set.
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On the other hand, if one's opponent is able to get a legendary Eldrazi out on turn 3, and this would apply more to Constructed than to Limited, losing to that is not really something that can be blamed on a failure to emphasize counters and removal enough in one's deck.



Sure it can, that's how the format works these days. Not entirely different from a T2 Woolly Thoctar or Doran, the Siege Tower

You can also put me in the camp who believes vendetta to be better than corpsehatch. Of course it all depends on the deck you are building however I had both of these cards in my deck at the pre release and vendetta was better more often. 8 life is not much in this format. While there were a few games where 8 life would have made a difference there weren't as many in this format as there have been in the past. Most of the games I played the winner ended the game with 10+ life. Add to the fact that vendetta can deal with levelers, and totem armor in ways that makes corpsehatch look like plague wind. Basically it depends on the type of deck I'm drafting. In aggro I want vendetta in a slower deck with colorless eldrazi I'll take corpsehatch.

I always laugh when these articles from the main site talk about the luck factor in Magic. They always make it sound like luck doesn't play much of a factor. I understand his point about "don't blame your luck and actually evaluate your draft decisions" but the way he writes it he totally dismisses the luck factor the same as every other author on this site.

Don't be too smart to have fun
It seems to me you're either a troll or you have strong preconceived ideas about the format that you are too stubborn to reevaluate, no matter what people, even Limited experts, tell you. I don't expect to be able to change that in your case, but for those who might lean towards thinking that way and are scared to try the format for that reason, know this : every color has mutiple good ways to efficiently deal with the Eldrazi (except Emrakul and Ulamog which are Mythic and hella hard to cast). The average draft deck has either multiple removal spells for them, or, in the case of red-green decks, has more of them and more ways to cast them faster, and is able to best the opponent's Eldrazi in combat. That doesn't mean Eldrazi don't win games, otherwise no one would be willing to pay their hefty mana costs, but the fact is that the threat they represent, the answers to them and the other types of threats available besides them are all very well balanced.



I don't consider myself a troll, but I will certainly cop to having a stubborn and strong negative opinion about this set ... and I'm sorry, I believe it's based on enough personal attempts and intelligent decision, not merely being closed minded.  I don't know who you are considering the "Limited experts" that are apparently trying to tell me otherwise, beyond Steve (unless you're counting yourself?), but your response to my accusations is only statements without any information or fact backing them up.

I drafted the set the entire week.  I also recognized the potential of U/W levellers and tried to go that way many times, with what I feel in other formats would have been good success.  The decks all had tempo, spot removal, threats, etc.  What they didn't have is more than 2-3 removal spells; in no draft did I see an Oust, Narcolepsy, Corpsehatch or Vendetta later than a 3rd pick.  There aren't enough for, as you say, "the average draft deck has ... multiple removal spells for them".  It's simply not true.  Everyone grabs the 5 common removal spells quickly (as they should).  I tried to go R/G and speed up my decks, but the Heat Rays in my hand cry when a (common) Crusher (or worse) hit the table.  Please give me the names of these supposed answers that Red and Green have, if not "Heat Ray + more mana than them"?  I drafted the Black, got a few of the removal spells (hell, I even opened the instant "less than 3" Wrath), and stared at the "non-black" aspect of it as I got pounded in the face by the likes of the 4/4 Witch and Pestilence Demon.  There is NOT enough removal in the set to appropriately deal with moderate threats whilst still nursing a removal spell if they drop an Eldrazi.  Again, please give me a list beyond the universally agreed top removal spells.

I've played Magic since Revised.  I've drafted every block you can.  I hated some seasons, loved others, adjusted well sometimes and never felt as comfortable in others.  Until now, I've never universally despised a draft format so much that it compelled me to revisit my Magic website sign on and voice my opinion; never checked the calendar to see if I could hold out until the next set of cards becomes the default draft at my FNM.  Until RoE. 

When Tempest came out and Cursed Scroll was hot, I remember people thinking "This isn't proper Magic ... it rewards you for being a bad player and emptying your hand".  I didn't buy that.  When Ravnica came out and people bitched that there wasn't enough flexibility because "you only have X number of color combinations to realistically build your deck around", I shrugged and did it.  But RoE says to me "build up defense and mana until you draw that overcosted card you happened to open", and I am listening to what it's telling me.  I know efficient decks CAN win; but I also know that the percentage of games won solely on luck went from, I dunno, 6% to 15%.  (Random numbers used here, please don't attempt to debate them.  Merely illustrating the jump.)  That's the point that you and your fellow "troll accusers" seem to miss; we're not complaining that Bombs ALWAYS win ... we're complaining that the NUMBER of games that bombs now win is TOO HIGH.
people have complained that all the games in the new Limited format are determined by mana screw or who plays their bomb first. I can tell you right now, thinking that way is a great way to not improve at Magic. If you try to blame your losses on luck or on the format being "bomb-dependent," then you're really missing the big picture.


Another writer for Magic, blaming the customer.  It's a good article, except for the lede.
Luck is something you can't control. Focusing on the things we can control is far more worthwhile task.  I'm having fun improving my drafting skills with this set.
Meh, Limited is pretty... what's the word I'm looking for...? Boring. The majority of Rise was pretty obviously created with only limited in mind and while that might not be entirely bad on its own, it makes RoE look bad compared to previous sets.

For the cards themselves, vendetta, smite, and deprive are all awesome in my book. I was really hoping for a reprint of smite in 10th, and then in M10, and it's nice to finally see it back. Deprive is really good w/ landfall especially... (hedron crab). For the billionth time (I grow tired of saying it), it's not counterspell, but it'll do for now.

BRING COUNTERSPELL BACK!!!! Okay, I'm done.
It's not a bad way of thinking about it when it's true, though.


For example, in M10 limited, most strategies were revolved around bombs, since there were so many at Uncommon.


A very succesful strategy was something like, stay alive until I draw my Overrun, or my Fireball, or Sleep, or Bogardan Hellkite, or Ant Queen, or Mind Control, or whatever.


Aside from Zendikar, where there really wasn't any such thing as a bomb because the format was so fast.



In other formats though, there are certain cards that make it true.  How exactly do you propose to beat a Martial Coup, or a Lavalanche, or Sacred Mesa, or a Stormbind, or a Jitte, or whatever?  Your average deck is not goign to have a good way to deal with those cards maindeck, and may have one sideboard card that can deal with it.


The only way I can agree with your statement is if we're using a very broad definition of "bomb", like including a Mahamotti Djinn as a "bomb".
The only way I can agree with your statement is if we're using a very broad definition of "bomb", like including a Mahamotti Djinn as a "bomb".

Well, isn't it?
"Hard to deal with + must be dealt with" is pretty much the only bomb criteria, right?

Meh, Limited is pretty... what's the word I'm looking for...? Boring. The majority of Rise was pretty obviously created with only limited in mind and while that might not be entirely bad on its own, it makes RoE look bad compared to previous sets.

For the cards themselves, vendetta, smite, and deprive are all awesome in my book. I was really hoping for a reprint of smite in 10th, and then in M10, and it's nice to finally see it back. Deprive is really good w/ landfall especially... (hedron crab). For the billionth time (I grow tired of saying it), it's not counterspell, but it'll do for now.

BRING COUNTERSPELL BACK!!!! Okay, I'm done.



I wonder why they chose righteousness over smite. Then they made it worse by including righteousness in every white intro pack from M10 until Rise of Eldrazi. Ugh. The card is so bad I really wished they had mixed it up a bit with the intro packs instead of putting one in each. There are only 40 cards why does one of them have to be righteousness
Don't be too smart to have fun
Pretty much all of the writers at wizards don't know what they are talking about or are total douchbags.

- Mike Flores has made a ton of innacurate or flat out wrong statements

- Steve in this article because he somehow thinks that everyone will always have good enough luck to always draw removal or get passed removal. He acts like there is no luck involved in magic.

- Maro, because he is Maro, and his constant apple fanboyism. NO ONE CARES ABOUT HOW MUCH YOU USE YOUR iPHONE!!!!

- Adam, because all he does is subtly suggest that blue is terrible overpowered and unfun.  

The only one I don't find to be a douch is the guy that writes Savor the Flavor.

I don't agree that this is true all across the board, but last week and this week, yeah. I was really disappointed in Eldrazi Week, and I was really looking forward to some interestingly epic articles about creating or playing with them. I'm one of the people who hated hated hated the idea of the Eldrazi, wasn't even looking forward to the prerelease, went anyway and played one of those mana ramp to mythic Eldrazi concoctions, had a surprising amount of success, and fell in love... so I really wanted to hear a lot about concepting them and making them work and such, and it seemed everything was off point! SAD ME WAS SAD.

And... I'm usually one of the people who likes MaRo even when he's being insufferable, but that last WOOO APPLE! one just... gah, no.  There's probably a good point buried in there, but his fanboying of other designers for long stretches before getting to telling us why he's inspired by them turned me off so much I couldn't really process the meat when I finally got to it. Nyargh.

Get your mojo back guys, I love you when you've got it.
Meh, Limited is pretty... what's the word I'm looking for...? Boring. The majority of Rise was pretty obviously created with only limited in mind and while that might not be entirely bad on its own, it makes RoE look bad compared to previous sets.

For the cards themselves, vendetta, smite, and deprive are all awesome in my book. I was really hoping for a reprint of smite in 10th, and then in M10, and it's nice to finally see it back. Deprive is really good w/ landfall especially... (hedron crab). For the billionth time (I grow tired of saying it), it's not counterspell, but it'll do for now.

BRING COUNTERSPELL BACK!!!! Okay, I'm done.



I wonder why they chose righteousness over smite. Then they made it worse by including righteousness in every white intro pack from M10 until Rise of Eldrazi. Ugh. The card is so bad I really wished they had mixed it up a bit with the intro packs instead of putting one in each. There are only 40 cards why does one of them have to be righteousness



Because new players think it's awesome. A double Giant Growth!
smite, and 
[...] are all awesome in my book.



Wut?
Blocked creature? My gosh. Somewhere in the middle of designing this set, they just said "Eff this. Lets just print whatever. They'll play it in Limited, right?"

Orzhova Witness

Restarting Quotes Block
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Disregard women acquire chase rares.
There are a lot of dudes for whom this is not optional.
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How;s a 2 drop 1/2, Flying broken? What am I missing?
You're missing it because *turns Storm Crows sideways* all your base are belong to Chuck Norris and every other overused meme ever.

I wonder why they chose righteousness over smite. Then they made it worse by including righteousness in every white intro pack from M10 until Rise of Eldrazi. Ugh. The card is so bad I really wished they had mixed it up a bit with the intro packs instead of putting one in each. There are only 40 cards why does one of them have to be righteousness

How's this for an explanation.  Righteousness has a powerful (+7/+7 for one mana!), if very restricted, ability.  That makes it flashy.  It is also very interactive (your opponent has to choose to attack, you have to then block with your own creature, they then have to not kill your guy after you play the Righteousness).  Giving your opponent lots of outs may not make a card you want to play, but it does make a card that leads to interesting games.

If removal spells were all Giant Growth, Righteousness, and Soul's Fire, Magic would be a more interactive (and possibly better) game.  (As long as most creatures could be realistically dealt with via such spells.  No Sprouting Thrinax or regenerators, probably fewer bombs.)

Thanks to everyone who helped with the design of the plane of Golamo in the Great Designer Search 2!
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Kicker Aggro (Invasion Block) Sunforger/Izzet Guildmage Midrange (Ravnica/Time Spiral/Xth Standard) Dragonstorm Combo (Time Spiral/Lorwyn/Xth Standard) Bant Midrange (Lorwyn/Shards/M10 Standard)
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Angel Resurrection Casual Soul Sisters Sindbad's Adventures with Djinn of Wishes Sphinx-Bone Wand Buyback Morph (No Instants or Sorceries) Cabal Coffers Control Zombie Aggro Hungry, Hungry Greater Gargadon/War Elemental Flashfires/Boil/Ruination - Boom! Call of the Wild Teysa, Orzhov Scion with Twilight Drover, Sun Titan, and Hivestone Slivers Rebels Cairn Wanderer Knights Only Gold and () Spells Captain Sisay Toolbox Spellweaver Helix Combo Merfolk Wizards Izzet Guildmage/The Unspeakable Arcane Combo Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind and his Wizards Creatureless Wild Research/Reins of Power Madness Creatureless Pyromancer Ascension Anarchist Living Death Anvil of Bogardan Madness Shamen with Goblin Game/Wound Reflection Combo Mass damage Quest for Pure Flame Valakut, the Molten Pinnacle/Clear the Land with 40+ Lands Doubling Season Thallids Juniper Order Ranger Graft/Tokens Elf Archer Druids Equilibrium/Aluren Combo Experiment Kraj Combo Reap Combo False Cure/Kavu Predator Combo Savra, Queen of the Golgari Sacrifice/Dredge Elf Warriors Eight-Post Sneak Attack Where Ancients Tread Zur the Enchanter with Opal creatures Tamanoa/Kavu Predator/Collapsing Borders Esper Aggro Mishra, Artificer Prodigy and his Darksteel Reactor Theft and Control Unearth Aggro Soul's Fire Vampires Devour Tokens Phytohydra with Powerstone Minefield Treefolk Friendly? Questing Phelddagrif Slivers Dragon Arch Fun I'm probably forgetting a few...
Wut?
Blocked creature? My gosh. Somewhere in the middle of designing this set, they just said "Eff this. Lets just print whatever. They'll play it in Limited, right?"

Personally, I think they're trying to make it the case that blocking happens more often in Constructed too.

Whether this will actually happen is another matter, but I think they intend it.
The article also notes the other important thing to do: make every turn count instead of just waiting to play your own bomb later on.


This is why level up creatures are inherently bad.
Leveling up a creature makes your turn "not count" as you wait for that creature to become a "bomb".

Orzhova Witness

Restarting Quotes Block
58086748 wrote:
58335208 wrote:
Disregard women acquire chase rares.
There are a lot of dudes for whom this is not optional.
97820278 wrote:
144532521 wrote:
How;s a 2 drop 1/2, Flying broken? What am I missing?
You're missing it because *turns Storm Crows sideways* all your base are belong to Chuck Norris and every other overused meme ever.
The article also notes the other important thing to do: make every turn count instead of just waiting to play your own bomb later on.


This is why level up creatures are inherently bad.
Leveling up a creature makes your turn "not count" as you wait for that creature to become a "bomb".



This is an inherently false assumption.  Improving a creature by making use of the Level up mechanic is not equivalent to making your turn "not count."  You have improved your board position.  Doing so may very well be relevant in the same turn.  The fact that you didn't need to waste an extra card from your hand to do so is a boon.

You are making the mistake of conflating the fact some of the levelers are not efficient, with the erroneous assumption that level up as a mechanic is inefficient.  The vast majority of non-leveler creatures are not efficient either, including the infamous Craw Worm you are so fond of using as a measuring stick.
The article also notes the other important thing to do: make every turn count instead of just waiting to play your own bomb later on.


This is why level up creatures are inherently bad.
Leveling up a creature makes your turn "not count" as you wait for that creature to become a "bomb".


I really making my turn not count. Like when I level up my student twice on turn 2 to swing for 3. Or level up my dragonlord with some mana I wasn't using on turn 3, so I can fly over their wall of omens on turn 4. Turn one guide, turn 2 dragonlord puts a lot of pressure on any deck.

Also all of the level up creatures are pretty sick in limited (with the exception of echo mage and maybe the squire guy), I'm not really sure how the discussion of this limited article has become some kind constructed discussion.
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