Why do Devas have genders?

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It seems odd to bring up, but if Devas do not have children, and are reincarnated with the same soul every time one dies, why is there a differentiation between male and female? It isn't that big of an issue, of course, I was just wondering if there are any sources offering an explanation.
I don't know about you, but I'm married, so I don't need to play a sexless character in a game, too.
Guroth, you just made my week.

In a Dragon article, it's explained that Devas are created to get the full range of humanoid experience. This includes sexuality. They can't bear children, but they can still engage in sexual and romantic relations (once people can get past their inherent oddness). They can reincarnate as either gender too.

It also states that devas are generally of perfect form, but some may choose to reincarnate as short, fat, ugly, skinny, lame, or otherwise malformed in order to understand that aspect of being a mortal.

It's likely an issue of self-identity and a factor with how the soul was first elevated/created. 

If you don't care for that explanation, the soul likely subconsciously chooses a gender as a matter of not looking like a freak among the two gendered races.

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In a Dragon article, it's explained that Devas are created to get the full range of humanoid experience. This includes sexuality. They can't bear children, but they can still engage in sexual and romantic relations (once people can get past their inherent oddness). They can reincarnate as either gender too.

It also states that devas are generally of perfect form, but some may choose to reincarnate as short, fat, ugly, skinny, lame, or otherwise malformed in order to understand that aspect of being a mortal.




The Deva Bloodline feat would seem to suggest Deva can mate with other races and produce children.
It's just like in Avatar: The Last Airbender. The reincarnated soul's past lives vary in gender, ethnicity, personality, and physical attributes.

Gender is part of being a mortal. Unless you're born as a neuter of your race, like the aliens from Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy.
It seems odd to bring up, but if Devas do not have children, and are reincarnated with the same soul every time one dies, why is there a differentiation between male and female? It isn't that big of an issue, of course, I was just wondering if there are any sources offering an explanation.



Actually, Devas can have children -- just not with each other.  The Deva Heritage feat has fluff suggesting descent from a liaison between a Deva and a member of another race.
It's the business model.  Trust me when they make jellies and oozes playble as characters, they'll have male and female.
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Zombies, Vampires, and Cenobites all have sexes while being rather asexual.
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It's the business model.  Trust me when they make jellies and oozes playble as characters, they'll have male and female.




Warforged and Shardminds do not have gender. Although they can both opt to appear in that form (warforged via modification, shardminds via will).

In a Dragon article, it's explained that Devas are created to get the full range of humanoid experience. This includes sexuality. They can't bear children, but they can still engage in sexual and romantic relations (once people can get past their inherent oddness). They can reincarnate as either gender too.

It also states that devas are generally of perfect form, but some may choose to reincarnate as short, fat, ugly, skinny, lame, or otherwise malformed in order to understand that aspect of being a mortal.




Excuseme could you give me the number of Dragon with this article?
So i can read it.

Best reguards

Elish
Zombies, Vampires, and Cenobites all have sexes while being rather asexual.



Totally different.  Vampires and zombies are the animated carcasses of creatures that reproduce sexually.  They're riding around in pre-owned bodies built for a different purpose.  Deva are sort of the other way around: they're pre-owned souls riding around in brand new bodies built in response to a demand for labor.  When you think about it from that angle, shouldn't they be more specialized?
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Excuseme could you give me the number of Dragon with this article?
So i can read it.



Dragon 374; article is "Ecology of the Deva".

Thanks, i forgot to read the post and  I already found the article.

elish
Guroth shooted the best possible answer I may say.

what you should be asking now, my sex addict friend, is:
Why do female dragonborns have boobs?
what you should be asking now, my sex addict friend, is:
Why do female dragonborns have boobs?



Magic.
Leaders are fifth wheels - the steering one.

A wizard did it.

A kinky one.

I remember reading some where... I am not sure where but female dragonborns... Lactate. So breasts are needed.
I remember reading some where... I am not sure where but female dragonborns... Lactate. So breasts are needed.


hum... deep
So greasy virgins can make there character have sex with them. Duh.
Guroth shooted the best possible answer I may say.

what you should be asking now, my sex addict friend, is:
Why do female dragonborns have boobs?


Because a platypus produces milk, so why not a dragonborn?
It seems odd to bring up, but if Devas do not have children, and are reincarnated with the same soul every time one dies, why is there a differentiation between male and female? It isn't that big of an issue, of course, I was just wondering if there are any sources offering an explanation.


I haven't read the 374 article yet, but I tend to like the explanation that the game devs think 4e *needs* a female/male for every race.  Female players are hard enough to come by in DnD, and they usually want to play female characters (imagine that?).  When you're trying to increase the success of your product by appealing to new and different varieties of people, you need to lure them in somehow.

I do agree that a few of the races could go minus-boobs and be fine; Minotaur, Shardmind, Dragonborn, and Wilden.
Just wondering why Minotaurs would be without? Cows certainly arent.
Guroth shooted the best possible answer I may say.

what you should be asking now, my sex addict friend, is:
Why do female dragonborns have boobs?



Because a platypus produces milk, so why not a dragonborn?


And it's not as if the idea of a race laying eggs and having breasts is anything new to D&D; way back in the AD&D Monster Manual, Githyanki and Githzerai were described as laying eggs, and their women have always had cleavage. Very scrawny cleavage, admittedly, with those gaunt builds, but still cleavage.
Guroth shooted the best possible answer I may say.

what you should be asking now, my sex addict friend, is:
Why do female dragonborns have boobs?




Because a platypus produces milk, so why not a dragonborn?



And it's not as if the idea of a race laying eggs and having breasts is anything new to D&D; way back in the AD&D Monster Manual, Githyanki and Githzerai were described as laying eggs, and their women have always had cleavage. Very scrawny cleavage, admittedly, with those gaunt builds, but still cleavage.

And many dinosaurs now seem to have been warm blooded (zoology is arbitrary categorization).... but if you want a species to have a strong socio-emotional connection from one generation to the next mammary glands and intimately sharing nutrients for an implied dependent childhood is not a bad way.  

Kobolds can be the cold blooded short lived reptilians without mammaries if you like;-p

My dragonborn I flavor as magical humans with souls of dragons anyway.  
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At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
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DnD community forum states:
"yes, although the general opinion is that we don't, I have to say yes... we have geeks indeed".
DnD community forum states:
"yes, although the general opinion is that we don't, I have to say yes... we have geeks indeed".



Yes geeks, but nerds those are out of style.

  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

A deva chooses it's appearance and gender at the time of rebirth for reasons beyond mortal comprehension. 

A more interesting question is the gender of changelings. After all, they can change at will. Talk about catering to your greasy virgins... 
     Where does the fluff suggest that they have differing genders at all?  I don't see anything to that effect, and they all seem to dress very similarly (the bare-chested male and covered-up female might be a nod to social mores, or might simply be because the female is wearing armor); at least as far as the PHB II entry goes, I see no indication that the deva have genders.
(I employ zie/zie/zir as a gender-neutral counterpart to he/him/his. Just a heads-up.) Essentials definitely isn't for me as a player, and I feel that its design and implementation bear serious flaws which fill me with concern for the future of D&D, but I've come to the conclusion that it isn't going to destroy the game that I want to play. Indeed, I think that I could probably run a game for players using Essentials characters without it being much of a problem at all. Time will tell, I suppose.
You might want to bring this question to the greek demigods."hint hint"

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A gender might be an optional feature on a deva.  Bear in mind they're purpose built, and I would imagine that their purposes frequently require them to interact with people.  Choosing a gender is probably a popular choice among them because it helps ease their dealings with races that reproduce sexually, which seem to comprise a majority of the civilized creatures in most game settings.  While it might be possible for them to appear without one, that might not be a wise choice unless their mission puts them in frequent contact with asexual creatures, or perhaps if their cause would be well served if their appearance was unnerving to people.

"When Friday comes, we'll all call rats fish." D&D Outsider
Maybe, in their earliest lives, they were asexual, but after eons of being born into the world, and interacting with people who do divide along those lines, they began to differentiate as well based on their inner natures, by unconscious choice.