Dungeon 176 - Fantastic Terrain: Elemental Motes

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DnDi_Large.png Dungeon 176
Fantastic Terrain
Elemental Motes

By Charles Choi

Today in Dungeon, we explore a concept brought up in Forgotten Realms – Earth Motes, now featured as Elemental motes.  We'll see how the terrain can become a featured adventure site for your campaign.


Just as with any island, bizarre societies can pop up on motes—feral halflings or mad albino dwarves or anything else you want—potentially leading to intriguing relationships with nearby lands. One unusual possibility is that monsters on motes might not even know the rest of the world exists if the monsters have no safe way off and are prevented from seeing their surroundings by, say, banks of clouds or walls of flame. How will the inhabitants of the motes deal with any strangers that pierce such veils?


Talk about this Dungeon article here.

176_elemental_motes.jpg


Before posting, why not ask yourself, What Would Wrecan Say?

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A great man once said "If WotC put out boxes full of free money there'd still be people complaining about how it's folded." – Boraxe

I am glad they brought up one of the oldest uses of this type of terrain, the Flying Citadels from Dragonlance.  I always thought they were an awesome concept, and they can actually be explained in 4e terms.
I totally loved this article. Probably one of my favorites in Dungeon so far. The top 10 earthmotes was a great section -- makes me wish I had a whole campaign arc to run with it. My next adventure will definitely be set on an earthmote. I also really liked the whole section about how to get up to them -- a lot of neat skill challenge and narrative material there. Props to the author.
Yeah, two thumbs up for this article. I am hammering out a MYRE for my group and this article played right into that. Woohoo!
While some may not care for the lack of hardcore FR content in a supposedly FR article, I liked it.

It was jam packed with ideas, many of which are worthy of cannibalising for one's own nefarious purposes.

It emphasized the fantastic nature of the terrain, which is a welcome change to traditional D&D design. Why use a ladder when you can use moonbeams or a pile of ravens?

It had giant peoplepults and burnchutes. 'Nuff said.
D&DNext: HTFU Edition
I totally loved this article. Probably one of my favorites in Dungeon so far. The top 10 earthmotes was a great section -- makes me wish I had a whole campaign arc to run with it. My next adventure will definitely be set on an earthmote. I also really liked the whole section about how to get up to them -- a lot of neat skill challenge and narrative material there. Props to the author.



I can't agree more. This is type of stuff I want to see more and more of in Dungeon magazine. These kind of articles are incredible and can totally inspire me as a DM to add something to my campaign that I may have never thought of.

This is one of my favorites. Excellent.

I really liked this article, the whole floating island idea is a great fantasy trope and giving DMs tips on doing it up right or twisting it in new directions (the fire mote doesn't sound like the kind of setting i'd ever want to use, but it's a great idea.) is a good thing.  I especially liked number 6 on the top 10, just because it's a floatig rock doesn't mean it has to be miles in the air.

I wouldn't mind seeing some of the suggested motes fleshed out, either as other settings have been, or as the location for an adventure.  the article presented great ideas, and a second one showing how those ideas can be combined and executed would be nice.
This is the happy swamp. Love it. I am red/blue, I think logically and act impulsively.
While some may not care for the lack of hardcore FR content in a supposedly FR article, I liked it.



It was never advertised as an FR article - merely that they first mentioned them in the FRCG but beyond that it has nothing to suggest it ever was for FR specifically.

It's a really solid article though.

The writing was solid but what really grabbed me was the art on the first page of the article.  The image of a waterfall spilling out of a floating island onto an oasis below reminds me of why I started playing D&D again.  It evokes that sense of the fantastic that can make it all so fun.  More please.

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