Arrow Slits and Murder Holes in Lost Mines of Karak. What???

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The section detailing the arrow slits and murder allows in the Gatehouse got me really perplexed.

Arrow Slits and Murder Holes: These apertures provide superior cover to creatures on either side of them.


Cover to creatures on both sides of them? What? That would make using them completely useless! If both the attackers and the defenders get the cover, then what have we achieved here?


However, they allow attacks to be made only in the two squares adjacent to them


What? I reread this sentence countless times, and still cannot understand what its meaning is. Which adjacent 2 squares? Does it mean that behind an arrow slit a defender can only attack those in just 2 squares that are adjacent to the arrow slit? Again, that would make the arrow slit completely useless!


A creature standing in a square adjacent to the wall 5 feet or more from an arrow slit cannot be seen by anyone on the other side.


Adjacent to a wall? What about squares not adjacent to a wall? Why does being adjacent to a wall have to do anything with this at all?

Gatehouse.jpg

It's because the dwarfs made the arrow slits backwards (see the map, they are angled to make shooting *into* the fortress easier) and tried to cover their mistake with crazy dwarf magic ;)

I completely ignored those restrictions when I ran it and had the slits grant cover to the monsters inside the fortress, and when I drew the map for the players I made sure I angled the slits in the right direction.  They never noticed the gaff.

The adjacent wall rule does make sense.  If someone in the entrance is sliding along the wall he can't be seen by the arrow slits on the same wall that are adjacent to him (or farther away).  However, he can be seen just fine from the arrow slits on the opposite wall and the ones in the ceiling.
I agree, the way that the arrow slits were written make arrow slits rather pointless.  I changed it so that anyone on the defensive side of the arrow slits had superior cover, while anyone on the business end only had cover.  I figured it was harder to hit them due to a reduced field of fire, but that's made up for the small target they present to the attacker.

The section detailing the arrow slits and murder allows in the Gatehouse got me really perplexed.

Arrow Slits and Murder Holes: These apertures provide superior cover to creatures on either side of them.


Cover to creatures on both sides of them? What? That would make using them completely useless! If both the attackers and the defenders get the cover, then what have we achieved here?



I think the intent is that attacking through an arrow slit provides superior cover to the target UNLESS you're adjacent to the slit.

Regarding visibility, I think the intent is that creatures on the outside can only see creatures on the inside that are next to the slit or in the space directly behind the one next to the slit.

I'll admit that the wording has failed to not be unclear though.  Tongue out
I just went with what I thought was the flavor of it: those on the 'inside', the 'defenders', didn't have any attack penalty to people they could see, whereas people on the 'outside' couldn't easily target them.  As far as what exactly they could and couldn't see, I just winged it, and the players didn't seem to notice that I wasn't using exact measurements.
It's because the dwarfs made the arrow slits backwards (see the map, they are angled to make shooting *into* the fortress easier) and tried to cover their mistake with crazy dwarf magic ;)



i don't think they are drawn incorrectly.  First off if you had the cone faceing the outside then missed shots could skip off the edges of the cone and be funneled into the slit right where the person is standing.  Immagine a bunch of sling bullets being fired at a cone, you could get seriously hurt.  On the other hand a flat wall with a slit in it is much harder to get a shot through.

Second you need to aim a the people outside and the angled walls on the inside give you jsut as many angle of attack as if they where on the outside.

Third i think the windows would let more light in if they where built this way rather than having a slit at the end of a short recessed tunnel.

Fourth, that's the way all forts are built.  You need thick walls to support the weight of the heavy rock over head and this way you can have a window and still have supporting walls.  See the following links.
estalia.net/estalia/argon2.gif
www.fromoldbooks.org/Gotch/pages/09-Cast...
www.skiptoncastle.co.uk/3dmap.asp
www.carneycastle.com/Dunsoghly/index.htm

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arrowslit






i don't think they are drawn incorrectly.  First off if you had the cone faceing the outside then missed shots could skip off the edges of the cone and be funneled into the slit right where the person is standing.  Immagine a bunch of sling bullets being fired at a cone, you could get seriously hurt.  On the other hand a flat wall with a slit in it is much harder to get a shot through.



Word.
Hah those arrow slits are not drawn backwards:

 en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arrowslit

your players were probably being polite by not pointing out your mistake when you reversed them.