Planechase FAQ

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_Planechase_(TM) Frequently Asked Questions
Compiled by Mark L. Gottlieb
Document last modified September 4, 2009

_Planechase_ official release date: Friday, September 4, 2009. Go to <www.wizards.com/locator> to find a store near you.

The _Planechase_ release consists of four different game packs: Elemental Thunder, Metallic Dreams, Strike Force, and Zombie Empire. Each game pack contains a 60-card traditional _Magic_(TM) deck and a 10-card planar deck. The 10 plane cards in each planar deck are different, for a total of 40 different plane cards.

This FAQ has two sections, each of which serves a different purpose.

The first section ("General Notes") explains the new rules for playing Planar Magic. The second section ("Card-Specific Notes") contains answers to the most important questions players might ask about a given plane card in the set.

Items in the "Card-Specific Notes" section include full rules text for your reference. Not all plane cards in the set are listed.
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GENERAL NOTES

***Overview***

Planar Magic is a casual variant in which plane cards add additional abilities and randomness to the game. A Planar Magic game is best as a Free-for-All game among 3-6 people with Constructed decks. Of course, you can turn any game (including two-player games, Limited games, and so on) into a Planar Magic game by adding the Planar Magic components and rules.

***Components***

All players need their own decks (made of traditional _Magic_ cards) and their own planar decks (made of plane cards). The game will also need one planar die.

* Plane cards are oversized _Magic_ cards that feature the "Planechase" back (as opposed to the "Deckmaster" back). Each one represents a place in the _Magic_ Multiverse.

* A planar deck must contain at least ten plane cards. Each card in a planar deck must have a different English name.

* The planar die is a specialized six-sided die. One side features the planeswalker symbol {P}. One side features the chaos symbol {C}. The other four sides are blank.

***Plane cards***

Plane is a new card type.

* Plane cards start the game in a new zone called the "command zone." They remain there throughout the game.

* Plane cards have no mana cost. They can't be cast as spells. They're not permanents.

* Since plane cards have no mana costs, they're all colorless.

* Each plane card has a subtype listed after a long dash. Unlike other subtypes, plane subtypes (or "planar types") may be multiple words. Each word after the dash is, collectively, a single subtype.

* A plane card may have any number of static, triggered, and/or activated abilities. As long as a plane card is face up in the command zone, its static abilities affect the game, its triggered abilities may trigger, and its activated abilities may be activated.

* A plane card is treated as if its text box included "When you roll {P}, put this card on the bottom of its owner's planar deck face down, then move the top card of your planar deck off that planar deck and turn it face up." This is called the "planeswalking ability."

* A face-up plane card that's turned face down becomes a new object with no relation to its previous existence. In particular, it loses all counters it may have had.

* Each plane card has a triggered ability that triggers "Whenever you roll {C}." These are called "chaos abilities." Each one is indicated by a {C} to its left, though the symbol itself has no special rules meaning.

* The owner of a plane card is the player who started the game with it in his or her planar deck.

* The controller of a plane card changes each turn. See the "Playing a Planar Magic Game" section below for more details.

* When a plane card is turned face up, it gets a new timestamp.

* If an effect would cause a plane card to leave the command zone, it doesn't; the plane card remains in the command zone. If an effect would bring a plane card into the game from outside the game, it doesn't; the plane card remains outside the game.

***Starting a Planar Magic Game***

Before the game begins, each player shuffles his or her traditional _Magic_ deck, then shuffles his or her planar deck so that the cards are in a random order. Each planar deck is placed face down next to its owner's library.

* Once all players have kept their opening hands and used the abilities of cards that allow them to start the game with those cards on the battlefield, the starting player turns the top card of his or her planar deck face up. No abilities of that card trigger as a result.

* Finally, the starting player takes his or her first turn.

***Playing a Planar Magic Game***

Only one plane card will be face up at any given time in a Planar Magic game.

* The controller of a face-up plane card is the player designated as the "planar controller." Normally, the planar controller is whoever the active player is. However, if the current planar controller would leave the game, instead the next player in turn order that wouldn't leave the game becomes the planar controller, then the old planar controller leaves the game. The new planar controller retains that designation until he or she leaves the game or a different player becomes the active player, whichever comes first.

* This means that control of the face-up plane will rotate around the table. If an ability of a plane refers to "you," it's referring to whoever the plane's controller is at the time, not to the player that started the game with that plane card in his or her deck. Many abilities of plane cards affect all players, while many others affect only the planar controller, so read each ability carefully.

* Any time the player whose turn it is could cast a sorcery, that player can roll the planar die. Taking this action costs the player an amount of mana equal to the number of times he or she has already rolled the planar die that turn. (It doesn't matter if that player has already rolled {C}, or already rolled {P} and planeswalked.) That means that the first roll each turn is free, the second roll costs {1}, the third roll costs {2}, and so on. The player may roll the die as many times as he or she likes (including none), as long as that player has the mana to pay for it.

* Rolling the planar die doesn't use the stack. It just happens. However, any abilities that trigger due to the roll's results do use the stack.

* Rolling the planar die could have three results:
-- If the roll is a blank face, nothing happens.
-- If the die roll is the chaos symbol {C}, the face-up plane card's "chaos ability" triggers. Players may cast instants and activate abilities before it resolves.
-- If the die roll is the planeswalker symbol {P}, the face-up plane card's "planeswalking ability" triggers. Players may cast instants and activate abilities before it resolves. When it resolves, the player who rolled the die puts the face-up plane card on the bottom of its owner's planar deck face down, then moves the top card of his or her planar deck off that planar deck and turns it face up.

* Nearly all {C} abilities are mandatory. For example, Bant says "Whenever you roll {C}, put a divinity counter on target green, white, or blue creature. That creature is indestructible as long as it has a divinity counter on it." When you roll {C}, you must use this ability, even if it forces you to make one of your opponent's creatures indestructible.

* When a player leaves the game, all objects owned by that player leave the game. If that includes the face-up plane card, the planar controller turns the top card of his or her planar deck face up immediately. If there's a "planeswalking ability" from the previous plane card on the stack, that ability ceases to exist. (If there's a {C} ability from the previous plane card on the stack, that ability will resolve as normal.)

* After the game has started, any time a player turns the top card of his or her planar deck face up, that player has "planeswalked." This could be as the result of a "planeswalking ability" or because the owner of the face-up plane card left the game. Effects that last until a player planeswalks end. Abilities that trigger whenever a player planeswalks trigger.

* The plane card that's turned face up is the plane the player planeswalks to. The plane card that's turned face down, or that left the game, is the plane the player planeswalks away from.

***Single Planar Deck Option***

As an alternative option, a Planar Magic game may be played with just a single communal planar deck.

* The number of cards in a single planar deck must be at least forty or at least ten times the number of players in the game, whichever is smaller. Each card in the planar deck must have a different English name.

* In a Planar Magic game using the single planar deck option, the planar controller is considered to be the owner of all the plane cards. That means ownership of the planes changes each turn just like control does. That also means that no plane cards will leave the game when a player leaves the game.

* If any rule or ability refers to a player's planar deck, the communal planar deck is used.

***Free-for-All Rules***

A Free-for-All game is quite similar to a two-player game, except that more players are involved. Over the course of a game, players may make temporary truces, deals and alliances -- politics matter! There are some rules differences as well, of course.

* Before the game starts, the players seat themselves randomly around the table.

* The first time a player takes a mulligan, he or she draws a hand of seven cards rather than six cards. If the player takes any further mulligans, his or her hand size decreases by one each time. (So it goes seven cards, seven cards, six cards, five cards, and so on.)

* The player who goes first doesn't skip his or her first draw of the game.

* As far as the cards are concerned, each other player in the game is your opponent, even if you've made a pact with them.

* Your spells and abilities can affect any player, permanent, or spell in the game, no matter how far away from you they are.

* Each turn is taken individually. Your turn works the same as in a two-player game, except for combat. You may attack any of the other players, and/or their planeswalkers, even if they're not sitting next to you. You can attack more than one player and/or planeswalker at once. When you declare attackers, announce which player or planeswalker each one is attacking.

* During the declare blockers step, each defending player, in turn order around the table, declares blockers. A player's creatures may block only the creatures that are attacking that player or one of his or her planeswalkers.

* After your turn ends, the player to your left takes the next turn. While it's not your turn, you can do all the things that you could do during your opponent's turn in a two-player game.

* A player wins the game when all his or her opponents have lost the game, or when an effect says that player wins the game.

***Leaving the Game***

Unlike in a two-player game, a multiplayer game continues after a player leaves the game (because that player lost the game or conceded).

* When a player leaves the game, all permanents, spells, and other cards (including plane cards) owned by that player also leave the game.

* If that player controlled any abilities or copies of spells that were waiting to resolve, they cease to exist.

* If that player controlled any permanents owned by another player, the effects that gave control of them to the player who left end. If that doesn't give control of them to a different player (perhaps because they entered the battlefield under the control of the player who left), they're exiled.

* If the player who left was taking his or her turn, that turn continues to its completion even though that player is now gone.
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CARD-SPECIFIC NOTES

Academy at Tolaria West
Plane -- Dominaria
At the beginning of your end step, if you have no cards in hand, draw seven cards.
Whenever you roll {C}, discard your hand.

* Academy at Tolaria West's first ability has an "intervening 'if' clause." That means (1) the ability won't trigger at all unless you have no cards in hand as your end step begins, and (2) the ability will do nothing unless you have no cards in hand by the time it resolves.

* If you discard your hand as a result of rolling {C}, Academy at Tolaria West's first ability will then trigger at the beginning of your end step (unless you planeswalk or somehow put a card in your hand before then).
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The Æther Flues
Plane -- Iquatana
When you planeswalk to The Æther Flues or at the beginning of your upkeep, you may sacrifice a creature. If you do, reveal cards from the top of your library until you reveal a creature card, put that card onto the battlefield, then shuffle all other cards revealed this way into your library.
Whenever you roll {C}, you may put a creature card from your hand onto the battlefield.

* The first ability of The Æther Flues doesn't target a creature. You don't choose a creature to sacrifice until the ability resolves. Once you choose a creature to sacrifice, it's too late for players to respond.

* If you use the first ability of The Æther Flues but there are no creatures in your library, you'll reveal your entire library then shuffle it.
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Agyrem
Plane -- Ravnica
Whenever a white creature is put into a graveyard from the battlefield, return it to the battlefield under its owner's control at the beginning of the next end step.
Whenever a nonwhite creature is put into a graveyard from the battlefield, return it to its owner's hand at the beginning of the next end step.
Whenever you roll {C}, creatures can't attack you until a player planeswalks.

* Agyrem's first and second abilities each set up a delayed triggered ability. These abilities will trigger at the beginning of the next end step even if Agyrem is no longer the face-up plane card.

* Agyrem's first ability will return a card to the battlefield only if it's still in the graveyard by the time the delayed triggered ability resolves. Similarly, Agyrem's second ability will return a card to its owner's hand only if it's still in the graveyard by the time the delayed triggered ability resolves.

* If a creature is put into a graveyard from the battlefield, its last existence on the battlefield is checked to determine its color.

* A creature that caused either of Agyrem's first two abilities to trigger will be returned at the beginning of the next end step even if it's not a creature card. (For example, if it's a Treetop Village.)

* If a token creature is put into a graveyard from the battlefield, one of Agyrem's first two abilities will trigger, but the token will cease to exist long before it would be returned somewhere.

* If multiple creatures are put into their owners' graveyards at the same time (due to combat damage or Planar Cleansing, for example), Agyrem's first two abilities trigger that many times. At the beginning of the next end step, the player whose turn it is at that time puts all of his or her Agyrem delayed triggered abilities on the stack in any order, then each other player in turn order does the same. The last ability put on the stack is the first one that resolves. The creatures are returned one at a time.

* If you're affected by the {C} ability, creatures will still be able to attack planeswalkers you control.
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Bant
Plane -- Alara
All creatures have exalted. (Whenever a creature attacks alone, it gets +1/+1 until end of turn for each instance of exalted among permanents its controller controls.)
Whenever you roll {C}, put a divinity counter on target green, white, or blue creature. That creature is indestructible as long as it has a divinity counter on it.

* If you declare exactly one creature as an attacker, each exalted ability on each permanent you control (including, perhaps, the attacking creature itself) will trigger. Note that if a creature has multiple instances of exalted, each one triggers separately. The bonuses are given to the attacking creature, not to the permanent with exalted. Ultimately, the attacking creature will wind up with +1/+1 for each of your exalted abilities.

* If you attack with multiple creatures, but then all but one are removed from combat, your exalted abilities won't trigger.

* Some effects put creatures onto the battlefield attacking. Since those creatures were never declared as attackers, they're ignored by exalted abilities. They won't cause exalted abilities to trigger. If any exalted abilities have already triggered (because exactly one creature was declared as an attacker), those abilities will resolve as normal even though there may now be multiple attackers.

* Exalted abilities will resolve before blockers are declared.

* Exalted bonuses last until the turn ends. If an effect creates an additional combat phase during your turn, a creature that attacked alone during the first combat phase will still have its exalted bonuses in that new phase. If a creature attacks alone during the second combat phase, all your exalted abilities will trigger again.

* In a Two-Headed Giant game, a creature "attacks alone" if it's the only creature declared as an attacker by your entire team. If you control that attacking creature, your exalted abilities will trigger but your teammate's exalted abilities won't.

* A creature with a divinity counter put on it due to the {C} ability remains indestructible even after Bant stops being the face-up plane card.

* If all divinity counters on a creature are moved to a different creature, the indestructibility doesn't move along with them. The first creature is no longer indestructible because it no longer has a divinity counter on it. The second creature isn't indestructible because the {C} ability didn't target it.
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Cliffside Market
Plane -- Mercadia
When you planeswalk to Cliffside Market or at the beginning of your upkeep, you may exchange life totals with target player.
Whenever you roll {C}, exchange control of two target permanents that share a card type.

* For two players to exchange life totals, what actually happens is that each player gains or loses the amount of life necessary to equal the other player's previous life total. For example, if Player A has 5 life and Player B has 3 life before the exchange, Player A will lose 2 life and Player B will gain 2 life. Other cards that interact with life gain or life loss will interact with this effect accordingly.

* Neither permanent you target with the {C} ability needs to be controlled by you.

* The control-change effect has no duration. For each permanent, it will last until the game ends or the permanent leaves the battlefield. It will override all previous control-change effects for those permanents, and may be overridden by a later control-change effect.

* Both permanents targeted by the {C} ability may be controlled by the same player. If they are, the effect nothing.

* If either permanent targeted by the {C} ability is an illegal target by the time the ability resolves, the exchange doesn't happen. If both targets become illegal, the ability is countered.
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The Dark Barony
Plane -- Ulgrotha
Whenever a nonblack card is put into a player's graveyard from anywhere, that player loses 1 life.
Whenever you roll {C}, each opponent discards a card.

* The Dark Barony's first ability doesn't behave like a leaves-the-battlefield triggered ability, since the card put into a graveyard may come from anywhere. If a card is put into a graveyard from the battlefield, its color is checked in the graveyard, not as it last existed on the battlefield.
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Eloren Wilds
Plane -- Shandalar
Whenever a player taps a permanent for mana, that player adds one mana to his or her mana pool of any type that permanent produced.
Whenever you roll {C}, target player can't cast spells until a player planeswalks.

* You're "tapping a permanent for mana" only if you're activating an activated ability of that permanent that includes the {T} symbol in its cost and produces mana as part of its effect.

* Eloren Wilds's first ability affects any permanent players tap for mana, not just lands they tap for mana.

* The additional mana is produced by Eloren Wilds, not the permanent that was tapped for mana.

* The {C} ability prevents the affected player from casting permanent spells (artifacts, creatures, enchantments, and planeswalkers), not just instant and sorcery spells. It doesn't stop the player from playing lands or activating abilities (such as cycling or unearth).
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Feeding Grounds
Plane -- Muraganda
Red spells cost {1} less to cast.
Green spells cost {1} less to cast.
Whenever you roll {C}, put X +1/+1 counters on target creature, where X is that creature's converted mana cost.

* Spells that are both red and green cost {2} less to cast.
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Glimmervoid Basin
Plane -- Mirrodin
Whenever a player casts an instant or sorcery spell with a single target, he or she copies that spell for each other spell, permanent, card not on the battlefield, and/or player the spell could target. Each copy targets a different one of them.
Whenever you roll {C}, choose target creature. Each player except that creature's controller puts a token that's a copy of that creature onto the battlefield.

* If a spell targets multiple things, it won't cause Glimmervoid Basin's first ability to trigger, even if all but one of those targets has become illegal.

* If a spell targets the same player or object multiple times, it won't cause Glimmervoid Basin's first ability to trigger.

* Other than choices involving modes or additional costs, the copies are created based on what they could target if the spell were cast anew. For example, if a player casts Naturalize ("Destroy target artifact or enchantment") targeting an artifact, Glimmervoid Basin's first ability will copy it for each artifact and enchantment it could target (and each copy will target a different one of those), not just for each artifact it could target.

* Anything that couldn't be targeted by the original spell (due to shroud, protection abilities, targeting restrictions, or any other reason) is just ignored by Glimmervoid Basin's first ability.

* The controller of the spell that caused Glimmervoid Basin's first ability to trigger also controls all the copies. That player chooses the order the copies are put onto the stack. The original spell will be on the stack beneath those copies and resolves last.

* The copies that Glimmervoid Basin's first ability creates are created on the stack, so they're not "cast." Abilities that trigger when a player casts a spell (like Glimmervoid Basin's first ability itself) won't trigger.

* If the spell that's copied is modal (that is, it says "Choose one --" or the like), the copy will have the same mode. Its controller can't choose a different one.

* If the spell that's copied has an X whose value was determined as it was cast (like Earthquake does), the copy has the same value of X.

* The controller of a copy can't choose to pay any additional costs for the copy. However, effects based on any additional costs that were paid for the original spell are copied as though those same costs were paid for the copy too.

* As a token is created by the {C} ability, it checks the printed values of the creature it's copying, as well as any copy effects that have been applied to it. It won't copy counters on the creature, nor will it copy other effects that have changed the creature's power, toughness, types, color, and so on.
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Grixis
Plane -- Alara
Blue, black, and/or red creature cards in your graveyard have unearth. The unearth cost is equal to the card's mana cost. (Pay the card's mana cost: Return it to the battlefield. The creature gains haste. Exile it at the beginning of the next end step or if it would leave the battlefield. Unearth only as a sorcery.)
Whenever you roll {C}, put target creature card in a graveyard onto the battlefield under your control.

* Despite the appearance of the reminder text, the unearth abilities that Grixis grants are activated abilities of each individual blue, black, and/or red creature card in a graveyard. They're not activated abilities of Grixis.

* A card's mana cost includes its color.

* Grixis may cause a creature card in a graveyard to have multiple unearth abilities. Its owner may activate any one of those abilities.

* If you activate a creature card's unearth ability but that card is removed from your graveyard before the ability resolves, that unearth ability will resolve and do nothing.

* Activating a creature card's unearth ability isn't the same as casting the creature card. The unearth ability is put on the stack, but the creature card is not. Spells and abilities that interact with activated abilities (such as Stifle) will interact with unearth, but spells and abilities that interact with spells (such as Essence Scatter) will not.

* At the beginning of the end step, a creature returned to the battlefield with unearth is exiled. This is a delayed triggered ability, and it can be countered by effects such as Stifle or Voidslime that counter triggered abilities. If the ability is countered, the creature will stay on the battlefield and the ability won't trigger again. However, the replacement effect will still exile the creature if it would eventually leave the battlefield.

* Unearth grants haste to the creature that's returned to the battlefield. However, neither of the exile abilities is granted to that creature. If that creature loses all its abilities, it will still be exiled at the beginning of the end step, and if it would leave the battlefield, it is still exiled instead.

* If a creature returned to the battlefield with unearth would leave the battlefield for any reason, it's exiled instead -- unless the spell or ability that's causing the creature to leave the battlefield is actually trying to exile it! In that case, it succeeds at exiling it. If it later returns the creature card to the battlefield (as Oblivion Ring or Flickerwisp might, for example), the creature card will return to the battlefield as a new permanent with no relation to its previous existence. The unearth effect will no longer apply to it.

* Unlike the unearth ability, the {C} ability returns a creature card from a graveyard to the battlefield indefinitely.
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The Hippodrome
Plane -- Segovia
All creatures get -5/-0.
Whenever you roll {C}, you may destroy target creature if its power is 0 or less.

* Creatures may have negative power. For example, a 3/4 creature that gets -5/-0 becomes -2/4. The total of its power and toughness is 2. It would need +3/+0 to raise its power to 1.

* A creature that would assign 0 or less combat damage (due to having power 0 or less) doesn't assign combat damage at all.

* You may target any creature with The Hippodrome's {C} ability. Whether its power is 0 or less isn't checked until the ability resolves.
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The Great Forest
Plane -- Lorwyn
Each creature assigns combat damage equal to its toughness rather than its power.
Whenever you roll {C}, creatures you control get +0/+2 and gain trample until end of turn.

* The Great Forest's first ability means, for example, that a 2/3 creature will assign 3 damage in combat instead of 2.

* The Great Forest's first ability doesn't actually change creatures' power; it changes only the value of the combat damage they assign. All other rules and effects that check power or toughness use the real values.
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Immersturm
Plane -- Valla
Whenever a creature enters the battlefield, that creature's controller may have it deal damage equal to its power to target creature or player of his or her choice.
Whenever you roll {C}, exile target creature, then return it to the battlefield under its owner's control.

* If a creature controlled by a player other than the planar controller enters the battlefield, the planar controller (not the creature's controller) controls Immersturm's triggered ability. That means that if multiple creatures enter the battlefield at the same time, that player controls all of Immersturm's triggered abilities and may put them on the stack in whichever order he or she likes. The last one put on the stack is the first one to resolve.

* When the {C} ability resolves, the targeted creature is exiled, then immediately returned to the battlefield as a new permanent with no relation to its previous existence.

* Any "as [this permanent] enters the battlefield" choices for the card returned by the {C} ability are made by that card's owner, not its old controller or the controller of the {C} ability.

* A token that has left the battlefield can't come back onto the battlefield. If the {C} ability exiles a token, that token remains in exile until state-based actions are checked, then it ceases to exist.
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Isle of Vesuva
Plane -- Dominaria
Whenever a nontoken creature enters the battlefield, its controller puts a token onto the battlefield that's a copy of that creature.
Whenever you roll {C}, destroy target creature and all other creatures with the same name as that creature.

* As a token is created by Isle of Vesuva's first ability, it checks the printed values of the creature it's copying, as well as any copy effects that have been applied to it. It won't copy counters on the creature, nor will it copy other effects that have changed the creature's power, toughness, types, color, and so on.

* If the creature that caused Isle of Vesuva's first ability to trigger has already left the battlefield by the time the ability resolves, the ability still creates a token. It will have the copiable values of the characteristics of that nontoken creature as it last existed on the battlefield.

* The {C} ability will destroy all creatures with the same name as the target creature, not just tokens created by Isle of Vesuva's first ability. It doesn't matter who controls them.

* If the permanent targeted by the {C} ability has become an illegal target by the time the ability resolves, the ability is countered. Nothing will be destroyed.

* If the permanent targeted by the {C} ability isn't destroyed (because it regenerates, or because it's indestructible), all other permanents with the same name as it will still be destroyed.

* A token's name is the same as the creature types listed by the effect that created it, unless the token copies a permanent or that effect specifically gives that token a name. For example, the effect of The Fourth Sphere's {C} ability creates a token with the name "Zombie."

* A face-down creature has no name, so it doesn't have the same name as anything else.
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Izzet Steam Maze
Plane -- Ravnica
Whenever a player casts an instant or sorcery spell, that player copies it. The player may choose new targets for the copy.
Whenever you roll {C}, instant and sorcery spells you cast this turn cost {3} less to cast.

* The effect of Izzet Steam Maze's first ability is mandatory. You must copy the spell whether you want to or not.

* Izzet Steam Maze's first ability will copy any instant or sorcery spell, not just one with targets.

* The controller of the spell that caused Izzet Steam Maze's first ability to trigger also controls the copy. The copy resolves before the original spell.

* A copy is created even if the spell that caused Izzet Steam Maze's first ability to trigger has been countered by the time that ability resolves.

* The copy will have the same targets as the spell it's copying unless its controller chooses new ones. That player may change any number of the targets, including all of them or none of them. The new targets must be legal.

* If the spell that's copied is modal (that is, it says "Choose one --" or the like), the copy will have the same mode. Its controller can't choose a different one.

* If the spell that's copied has an X whose value was determined as it was cast (like Earthquake does), the copy has the same value of X.

* The controller of the copy can't choose to pay any additional costs for the copy. However, effects based on any additional costs that were paid for the original spell are copied as though those same costs were paid for the copy too.

* The copy that Izzet Steam Maze's first ability creates is created on the stack, so it's not "cast." Abilities that trigger when a player casts a spell (like Izzet Steam Maze's first ability itself) won't trigger.
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Lethe Lake
Plane -- Arkhos
At the beginning of your upkeep, put the top ten cards of your library into your graveyard.
Whenever you roll {C}, target player puts the top ten cards of his or her library into his or her graveyard.

* If you don't have ten cards in your library, you'll put all the cards in your library into your graveyard. The same is true if the targeted player doesn't have ten cards in his or her library.
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The Maelstrom
Plane -- Alara
When you planeswalk to The Maelstrom or at the beginning of your upkeep, you may reveal the top card of your library. If it's a permanent card, you may put it onto the battlefield. Otherwise, put that card on the bottom of your library.
Whenever you roll {C}, return target permanent card from your graveyard to the battlefield.

* A permanent card is an artifact, creature, enchantment, land, or planeswalker card.

* As The Maelstrom's first ability resolves, you choose whether or not to reveal the top card of your library. If you reveal it and it's a permanent card, you have two choices: Put it onto the battlefield, or put it on the bottom of your library. It can't remain on top of your library. On the other hand, if you reveal it and it's an instant or sorcery card, it must remain on top of your library.

* If you reveal a permanent card that can't enter the battlefield (because it's an Aura and there's nothing it can enchant, for example), then you must put it on the bottom of your library.
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Minamo
Plane -- Kamigawa
Whenever a player casts a spell, that player may draw a card.
Whenever you roll {C}, each player may return a blue card from his or her graveyard to his or her hand.

* Minamo's first ability resolves before the spell that caused it to trigger.

* The {C} ability doesn't target the cards it will return, so they're not chosen until resolution. As the ability resolves, first the active player may choose a blue card in his or her graveyard, then each other player in turn order does the same, then all cards chosen this way are returned to their owners' hands. Once a card is chosen, it's too late for players to respond.
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Murasa
Plane -- Zendikar
Whenever a nontoken creature enters the battlefield, its controller may search his or her library for a basic land card, put it onto the battlefield tapped, then shuffle his or her library.
Whenever you roll {C}, target land becomes a 4/4 creature that's still a land.

* The effect of the {C} ability has no duration. The affected land will remain a creature until the end of the game, it leaves the battlefield, or some other effect changes its card types, whichever comes first. It doesn't matter whether Murasa remains the face-up plane card.
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Naya
Plane -- Alara
You may play any number of additional lands on each of your turns.
Whenever you roll {C}, target red, green, or white creature you control gets +1/+1 until end of turn for each land you control.

* If you play a land during your turn, you must declare whether you're using your standard land play or Naya's first ability (or another similar ability).

* If you play lands using Naya's first ability, and then you planeswalk away from Naya, the lands you played still count as additional land plays for the turn. If you haven't already, you can still play a land using your standard land play.

* The bonus granted by the {C} ability is determined at the time it resolves. It won't change if the number of lands you control changes later in the turn.
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Otaria
Plane -- Dominaria
Instant and sorcery cards in graveyards have flashback. The flashback cost is equal to the card's mana cost. (Its owner may cast the card from his or her graveyard for its mana cost. Then he or she exiles it.)
Whenever you roll {C}, take an extra turn after this one.

* If you use a card's flashback ability, you're actually casting that card. It moves from your graveyard to the stack. Abilities that trigger when you cast a spell will trigger. That spell can be countered.

* If you cast a card by using flashback, you cast that card from your graveyard rather than your hand, and you pay an alternative cost rather than its mana cost, but everything else about casting that spell works normally. You must follow timing restrictions based on the card's type (if it's a sorcery), as well as other restrictions (such as "Cast [this card] only before blockers are declared"). You may pay additional costs (such as kicker). Effects that cause you to pay more or less for a spell will apply.

* As a spell cast with flashback resolves, it never goes to its owner's graveyard, so abilities that trigger on cards being put in a graveyard won't trigger. The card is exiled instead.

* If a spell cast by using flashback is countered, it's still exiled rather than being put into its owner's graveyard.

* If you use the flashback ability granted by Otaria to cast a split card from your graveyard, the flashback cost you pay is equal to the mana cost of the half that you're casting.

* If you use the flashback ability granted by Otaria to cast a card with X in its mana cost from your graveyard, you choose the value of X as you cast it. You'll still have to pay that X.

* Otaria may cause an instant or sorcery card in a graveyard to have multiple flashback abilities. Its owner may cast it using any one of those abilities.

* If you roll {C} multiple times in the same turn, you'll take that many extra turns after this one.
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Pools of Becoming
Plane -- Bolas's Meditation Realm
At the beginning of your end step, put the cards in your hand on the bottom of your library in any order, then draw that many cards.
Whenever you roll {C}, reveal the top three cards of your planar deck. Each of the revealed cards' {C} abilities triggers. Then put the revealed cards on the bottom of your planar deck in any order.

* The face-up plane card isn't currently part of its owner's planar deck. If the {C} ability is rolled by the owner of Pools of Becoming, Pools of Becoming is not one of the three cards that are revealed.

* You may put the {C} abilities of the three revealed plane cards on the stack in any order. The last one you put on the stack will be the first one to resolve.

* If one of the revealed plane cards is another Pools of Becoming, its {C} ability triggers. When it resolves, you'll reveal three more cards from the top of your planar deck, their {C} abilities will trigger, and you'll put them on the stack in any order on top of any remaining {C} abilities from the first Pools of Becoming's effect.
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Raven's Run
Plane -- Shadowmoor
All creatures have wither. (They deal damage to creatures in the form of -1/-1 counters.)
Whenever you roll {C}, put a -1/-1 counter on target creature, two -1/-1 counters on another target creature, and three -1/-1 counters on a third target creature.

* Wither applies to any damage, not just combat damage.

* The -1/-1 counters that result from wither remain on the damaged creature indefinitely. They won't be removed if the creature regenerates or the turn ends.

* Since damage from a creature with wither is real damage, it follows all the other rules for damage. It can be prevented or redirected. When it's dealt, it will cause "Whenever [this creature] deals damage" and "Whenever [this creature] is dealt damage" abilities to trigger.

* If the source of the damage is still on the battlefield at the time that damage is dealt, its characteristics are checked to see if it has wither. If the source has left the battlefield by then, its last existence on the battlefield is checked to see if it had wither.

* Damage from creatures with wither affects players and planeswalkers normally.

* Multiple instances of wither are redundant.

* You must target three different creatures when the {C} ability triggers, even if that means you have to target creatures you control. If you can't target three creatures (because there are just two creatures on the battlefield, perhaps), the ability is removed from the stack and does nothing.
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Sanctum of Serra
Plane -- Serra's Realm
When you planeswalk away from Sanctum of Serra, destroy all nonland permanents.
Whenever you roll {C}, you may have your life total become 20.

* If you planeswalk away from Sanctum of Serra because the player who owns Sanctum of Serra leaves the game, its first ability will still trigger and resolve.

* For a player's life total to become 20, what actually happens is that the player gains or loses the appropriate amount of life. For example, if your life total is 14 when this ability resolves, it will cause you to gain 6 life. Other cards that interact with life gain or life loss will interact with this effect accordingly.
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Skybreen
Plane -- Kaldheim
Players play with the top card of their libraries revealed.
Spells that share a card type with the top card of a library can't be cast.
Whenever you roll {C}, target player loses life equal to the number of cards in his or her hand.

* When playing with the top card of your library revealed, if an effect tells you to draw several cards, reveal each one before you draw it.

* If the top card of your library changes during the process of casting a spell or activating an ability, the new top card won't be revealed until the process of casting the spell or activating the ability ends (all targets are chosen, all costs are paid, and so on).

* Skybreen's second ability prevents each player from casting spells that share a card type with a card on top of any library, not just the one on top of that player's own library. This includes permanent spells (artifacts, creatures, enchantments, and planeswalkers), not just instant and sorcery spells. It doesn't stop players from playing lands or activating abilities (such as cycling or unearth).
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Sokenzan
Plane -- Kamigawa
All creatures get +1/+1 and have haste.
Whenever you roll {C}, untap all creatures that attacked this turn. After this main phase, there is an additional combat phase followed by an additional main phase.

* If you roll {C} twice in the same main phase, two new combat phases will be created. However, all creatures that attacked this turn untap as the {C} abilities resolve, not as the combat phases start. Any creature that attacks in the second combat phase will remain tapped during the third combat phase (unless you roll {C} again).
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Stronghold Furnace
Plane -- Rath
If a source would deal damage to a creature or player, it deals double that damage to that creature or player instead.
Whenever you roll {C}, Stronghold Furnace deals 1 damage to target creature or player.

* Stronghold Furnace's first ability interacts with all damage, not just combat damage. Notably, it doubles the damage from its own {C} ability.

* If multiple effects modify how damage will be dealt, the player who would be dealt damage or the controller of the creature that would be dealt damage chooses the order to apply the effects. For example, Mending Hands says, "Prevent the next 4 damage that would be dealt to target creature or player this turn." Suppose a spell would deal 5 damage to a player who has cast Mending Hands targeting him or herself. The player who would be dealt damage can either (a) prevent 4 damage first and then let Stronghold Furnace's effect double the remaining 1 damage, taking 2 damage, or (b) double the damage to 10 and then prevent 4 damage, taking 6 damage.

* Combat damage that a source would deal to a planeswalker is not doubled. However, if a source a player controls would deal noncombat damage to an opponent who controls a planeswalker, and that opponent chooses to apply Stronghold Furnace's replacement effect before applying the planeswalker redirection effect, the damage will be doubled before the source's controller chooses whether to deal it to a planeswalker that opponent controls. (If players always apply the planeswalker redirection effect first, Stronghold Furnace's effect will never double damage that a source would deal to a planeswalker.)

* If a spell or ability divides damage among multiple recipients (such as Pyrotechnics does), the damage is divided before Stronghold Furnace's effect doubles it. The same is true for combat damage.
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Turri Island
Plane -- Ir
Creature spells cost {2} less to cast.
Whenever you roll {C}, reveal the top three cards of your library. Put all creature cards revealed this way into your hand and the rest into your graveyard.

* Turri Island's first ability can't reduce the cost to cast a creature spell to less than {0}.

* If there are fewer than three cards in your library as the {C} ability resolves, you'll reveal all the cards in your library.
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Undercity Reaches
Plane -- Ravnica
Whenever a creature deals combat damage to a player, its controller may draw a card.
Whenever you roll {C}, you have no maximum hand size for the rest of the game.

* If multiple creatures deal combat damage to a player, the first ability of Undercity Reaches triggers multiple times.

* If a creature deals combat damage to a player, the controller of Undercity Reaches controls the ability that triggers, but the controller of the creature decides whether to draw a card.

* The {C} ability's effect continues to apply even after Undercity Reaches stops being the face-up plane card.

* If multiple effects modify your hand size, apply them in timestamp order. For example, if you put Null Profusion (an enchantment that says your maximum hand size is two) onto the battlefield and then roll {C} while Undercity Reaches is the face-up plane card, you'll have no maximum hand size. However, if those events had happened in the opposite order, your maximum hand size would be two for as long as Null Profusion is on the battlefield.
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Velis Vel
Plane -- Lorwyn
Each creature gets +1/+1 for each other creature on the battlefield that shares at least one creature type with it. (For example, if two Elemental Shamans and an Elemental Spirit are on the battlefield, each gets +2/+2.)
Whenever you roll {C}, target creature gains all creature types until end of turn.

* Sharing multiple creature types doesn't give an additional bonus. Velis Vel's first ability counts creatures, not creature types.

* The {C} ability doesn't give a creature changeling.
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Questions don't have to make sense, but answers do.

If Planes are a new card type, can card's like Pithing Needle and Voidstone Gargoyle prevent players from activating them?
If Planes are a new card type, can card's like Pithing Needle and Voidstone Gargoyle prevent players from activating them?


You can name a Plane card for Pithing Needle or Voidstone Gargoyle, but they prevent only activated abilities. These are always written in the [cost]: [effect] format.


No currently printed plane have any activated ability. All of them have triggered abilities (they start with when, whenever, or at), and some have also static abilities. For example, all "chaos" abilities say "whenever you roll [CHAOS]", so they're triggered. The Gargoyle and the Needle can't do anything against them.

[<o>]
Apologies. I missed the part about rolling not using the stack.
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