Rules on number of opportunity attacks per turn.

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I'm trying to find out how many opportunity attacks per round a player can have.

Also, I'm i'd like to know how powers are affected by. For example, if number of opportunity attacks used per round are finite, how are powers that grant them affected. Does specific beat general apply if your out of opportunity attacks but a power grants one anyway letting you have it?

Anyway, exact text in phb is as follows: You can take one opportunity action on each other combatant's turn. An opportunity action must be triggered by an enemy's action.

What does the bolded part mean?
It means if 12 creatures provoke an AoO from you, you can make an AoO on each of the 12 creatures. There is no maximum number of AoOs between a creatures turns.

You are limited to making 1 AoO on each creature, even if it provokes several AoOs from you.
Anyway, exact text in phb is as follows: You can take one opportunity action on each other combatant's turn. An opportunity action must be triggered by an enemy's action.

What does the bolded part mean?

It means that on each person's turn aside from your own, you may make one Opportunity Attack.

For instance, if an enemy moves up to and round you on its turn, provoking an OA for movement, then stops within your threatened area and makes a ranged attack, you could make the OA for his movement, but would not then be able to make an OA against his ranged attack. However, if a second opponent then acts on its own turn and provokes an OA from you, you can make one.

On the other hand, if two allied opponents were both within your threatened area, and one of them provoked an OA for movement from you, then used a power that granted its ally an immediate free ranged attack, you'd only be able to attack one of them, because that all occurred on a single monster's turn.

Even if several monsters act on the same initiative, each one's actions count as a separate turn for OA purposes.

As a general rule for all Opportunity Actions (including Attacks), you cannot use them on your own turn.
I was under the impression that a character could take only one immediate action per turn.
I was under the impression that a character could take only one immediate action per turn.

An OA is NOT an immediate action.
I was under the impression that a character could take only one immediate action per turn.

An OA is NOT an immediate action.

Also, the limit is one immediate action per round, while opportunity attacks are merely limited to one per turn.

How many ATTACKS per turn ?

 

Sorry to reactive this old post but I'm a bit puzzled by the answer.

 

I'm a newbie on D&D and I caught that ACTION are not necesseraly ATTACK.

 

So when the PBH says that a character can have an Opportunity Action by each opponent's turn, it's doesn't mean he can get an opportunity ATTACK each time.

 

Better to have an example : let's have a fighter surrounded by 8 stupid opponents.

If they run away (that's why they're stupid!) one by one, does the fighter (who hasn't yet get his turn) have 8 ATTACK opportunities ? Even at level 1 ??

Yes.

 

You can use on opportunity action per creature's turn in the combat, and you can use those to do whatever opportunity actions you might have available to you.  If things provoke, on separate turns, you can hit them on each of those turns.  Making on Opportunity Attack is an at-will ability; you can use it whenever it's provoked, as long as you're capable of doing so (not dazed or stunned, can see the opponent etc).

 

EVERYONE can do this, not just the fighter.


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What the heck, it's an old thread.  Allow me to go into a couple of further details to hopefully clarify further.

 

Opportunity Attack is an attack power that everyone can perform that is one type of Opportunity Action.  So when someone says you can take one opportunity action per turn, that means one opportunity attack.

 

Also, many DMs will have a bunch of monsters of the same type take their turns on the same initiative number.  Just becuase three orcs all act on initiative number 15 does not mean they all act on the same turn.  They each get their own turn, it's just that the DM will often handle all of their turns at once to make things go quicker (hopefully without cheating on the action economy, a common DM mistake, but that's another topic).  So yes, if all three of them run past you, you can take an opportunity attack on each one of them, because you're still only taking one OA per turn.

 

So to answer 95Spitfire's question, yes, the Fighter gets eight opportunity attacks, one on each opponent, and it doesn't matter whether he has had his turn yet or not.  He can't do OAs ON HIS OWN TURN, but he can do them any other time.  Even at level 1.  Because each of those opponents has their own turn, even if they all have the same initiative number.

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To add even more to this thread if the fighter has not acted because it is a surprise round then he would not get opritunity attacks against the track and feild team going past him because of the rules for surprise rounds.

Unless he has a feat or class feature that says it changes the rules of surprise rounds.

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