[$ = Win] Is it true nowadays?

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Just wondering about the title.
Its like u have to spend bout $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ to get a deck competible for a tournament if u want a chance to win. 
Im not complaining its just that it frustrates me that u have to spend so much cash to win.

So what are your thoughts?

Cheers!  

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56965528 wrote:
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Current deck goals:

NON-AGGRO, NON-MONO RED deck (Not getting very far with it though)

Standard mono red deck for FNM next Friday

Money buys cards, not skill.

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Just wondering about the title.
Its like u have to spend bout $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ to get a deck competible for a tournament if u want a chance to win. 
Im not complaining its just that it frustrates me that u have to spend so much cash to win.

So what are your thoughts?

Cheers!  



I'm not up all all the "decks to beat", but I think there are some RDW builds that don't involve a lot of money.  Also, as the previous poster says, you also need to know how to pilot the deck.



Mar 23, 2013 -- 10:49PM, -TheFlameReaper- wrote:

Just wondering about the title.
Its like u have to spend bout $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ to get a deck competible for a tournament if u want a chance to win. 
Im not complaining its just that it frustrates me that u have to spend so much cash to win.

So what are your thoughts?

Cheers!  





I'm not up all all the "decks to beat", but I think there are some RDW builds that don't involve a lot of money.  Also, as the previous poster says, you also need to know how to pilot the deck.


However, spending money on a solid mana base doesn't hurt.
Just wondering about the title.
Its like u have to spend bout $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ to get a deck competible for a tournament if u want a chance to win. 
Im not complaining its just that it frustrates me that u have to spend so much cash to win.

So what are your thoughts?

Cheers!  

Depends on what format I suppose.  In a game of "use any card" a solid red goblin/burn deck doesn't cost that much money(even if you add green for Rancors/giant growths).  Most 1/1 goblins you can get for dimes, goblin grenades are a dollar....turn and burn, for about 8 bucks you can make a decent gobbie deck(if not less $$). 

But, I do not deny that if you got $$ you can buy some great cards.

In time they will join you in the Sun-Man of Steel
If you are on a tight budget, you're definitely at a disadvantage. If you want to compete, you have to be good at spotting undervalued cards. Even then, you still need to buy decent lands.

I forget who wrote this first, but my favorite tip for playing on a budget:
Don't look for an expensive deck and try to substitute in cheaper cards. Build a deck from the ground up that revolves around cheap cards.
Good cards cost money. That's an inescapable fact of life when playing Magic. Sometimes good cards cost merely a lot. Sometimes they just cost absurd amounts of money. So yes, money usually gets you a better deck. Exceptions:

1. In some formats RDW or some other monocolored deck is good. They're typically cheaper.

2. If you're very good you can often identify what deck will become recognized as good soon before it actually becomes so, snag the cards while they're still cheaper and build the deck while it only costs an arm instead of the arm and a leg too.

3. If you're very good, you may be able to build some rogue brew that attacks the metagame of your local shop, for example, and do well without spending a bunch of money. This doesn't mean creativity or "going rogue" for it's own sake (as most people sadly do while insisting they're somehow better because they're original or something) but rather doing so with a purpose.

4. You play Pauper. It's a commons-only tournament format run on MTGO, and while the tournament viable commons are inevitably more expensive in the online world due to the format's popularity than they are on paper, you can still usually grab a no compromises made tournament deck for about 10-15 bucks in paper or 30-40 tickets (~=bucks) online.
Standard Pauper is even cheaper - it can usually be played with other people's draft castoffs and a few extra cards and while it doesn't have the official support, the player-run events are definitely there.
Trying to help "I'm original" people build better decks is self-sabotage: Good advice will inevitably be ignored because someone did it before. The gist of Magic is going to MWS/MTGO, playing Island, Ponder and watching the opponent ragequit.

[$ = Win] Is it true nowadays?


Nowadays? As opposed to when?

[<o>]
@OP: a question for you: name any kind of competition/competive game/sport where having more money does not give you an advantage?

(excluding those that work entirely on chance, like "coin flipping" etc)
 
~ Tim
I am Blue/White Reached DCI Rating 1800 on 28/10/11. :D
Sig
56287226 wrote:
190106923 wrote:
Not bad. But what happens flavor wise when one kamahl kills the other one?
Zis iz a sign uf deep psychological troma, buried in zer subconscious mind. By keelink himzelf, Kamahl iz physically expressink hiz feelinks uf self-disgust ova hiz desire for hiz muzzer. [/GermanPsychologistVoice]
56957928 wrote:
57799958 wrote:
That makes no sense to me. If they spelled the ability out on the card in full then it would not be allowed in a mono-black Commander deck, but because they used a keyword to save space it is allowed? ~ Tim
Yup, just like you can have Birds of paradise in a mono green deck but not Noble Hierarch. YAY COLOR IDENTITY
56287226 wrote:
56888618 wrote:
Is algebra really that difficult?
Survey says yes.
56883218 wrote:
57799958 wrote:
You want to make a milky drink. You squeeze a cow.
I love this description. Like the cows are sponges filled with milk. I can see it all Nick Parks claymation-style with the cow's eyes bugging out momentarily as a giant farmer squeezes it like a squeaky dog toy, and milk shoots out of it.
56287226 wrote:
56735468 wrote:
And no judge will ever give you a game loss for playing snow covered lands.
I now have a new goal in life. ;)
@OP: a question for you: name any kind of competition/competive game/sport where having more money does not give you an advantage?

(excluding those that work entirely on chance, like "coin flipping" etc)
 
~ Tim


Chess?

Yxoque wrote:
This forum can't even ****ing self-destruct properly.

IMAGE(http://img.pokemondb.net/sprites/black-white/anim/normal/plusle.gif)

@OP: a question for you: name any kind of competition/competive game/sport where having more money does not give you an advantage?

(excluding those that work entirely on chance, like "coin flipping" etc)
 
~ Tim


Chess?


You arent the OP but you fell for it anyway. ;)

A millionaire chess player can afford to travel to any tournament he wants, can retire from work do dedicate his whole day to practicing, can hire the best grand masters in the world to train him, can afford top of the range chess computers to play against, all the books, DVDs, etc that teach you how to play, and will have an edge over a poorer player.

Want to try another one? ;)

~ Tim       
EDIT: my point is that even though in chess all pieces and sets are identical ingame (you cant "buy a win" by purchasing a super queen that can teleport etc), money can still give you an edge.
Limited Magic evens the playing field a bit compared to Constructed, but still not entirely, as richer players can afford to enter more events and practice more, and can afford to pass up more money rares in order to build a game winning deck etc. 
I am Blue/White Reached DCI Rating 1800 on 28/10/11. :D
Sig
56287226 wrote:
190106923 wrote:
Not bad. But what happens flavor wise when one kamahl kills the other one?
Zis iz a sign uf deep psychological troma, buried in zer subconscious mind. By keelink himzelf, Kamahl iz physically expressink hiz feelinks uf self-disgust ova hiz desire for hiz muzzer. [/GermanPsychologistVoice]
56957928 wrote:
57799958 wrote:
That makes no sense to me. If they spelled the ability out on the card in full then it would not be allowed in a mono-black Commander deck, but because they used a keyword to save space it is allowed? ~ Tim
Yup, just like you can have Birds of paradise in a mono green deck but not Noble Hierarch. YAY COLOR IDENTITY
56287226 wrote:
56888618 wrote:
Is algebra really that difficult?
Survey says yes.
56883218 wrote:
57799958 wrote:
You want to make a milky drink. You squeeze a cow.
I love this description. Like the cows are sponges filled with milk. I can see it all Nick Parks claymation-style with the cow's eyes bugging out momentarily as a giant farmer squeezes it like a squeaky dog toy, and milk shoots out of it.
56287226 wrote:
56735468 wrote:
And no judge will ever give you a game loss for playing snow covered lands.
I now have a new goal in life. ;)
Having the money gets you to the starting line. Then after that it's about being a good player. You're playing a hobby game and the company that makes it isn't a charity. 
Having the money gets you to the starting line. Then after that it's about being a good player. You're playing a hobby game and the company that makes it isn't a charity. 



This. ++


It's not that spending money = winning. It's that this game has a buy-in that's needed to compete.
Not spending money = losing, especially since RDW got so dang expensive.

There are still cheaper decks out there. Eggs in modern is generally cheaper than most standard decks. I just cabled together a fairly cheap modern deck mysel and while I fully expect to die horrible at the GPQ coming up and then at GP Pdx, the deck itself won't be what kills me.

But hey, not all of us can shell out for a buy-in. My advice is: draft. Maybe it's different elsewhere, but around my parts you can draft and have a few beers for the same price as going out to a bar and buying, say, a few more beers (which dovetails nicely into not being able to get a new beer every time you hit empty because you're mid-game). By doing that and spending money I'd spend at least one weekend night a week anyways I can play some magic and possibly use my winnings to slowly accumulate staples/trade the value cards you got in the draft.

It took me a few months and finding a standard player/edh player who wanted my staples in exchange for his, but I managed to put together enough of my deck to buy the rest (I'd have pushed it farther but my trade binder went missing at some point, probably on mass transit. >.< )

You can do it frugaly or you can do it without work, but you'll need the cards to be in the running. The skill doesn't start until then but you're looking at it from the wrong direction.



That being said: pauper is a thing. A lot of the folks at my work aren't about to buy in. Solution? We play a lot of common/uncommon magic around the break room, with those of us who have a budget either keeping our "real" decks for each other and for multiplayer.

Competitive hobbies all have a buy-in. It's a thing.
76783093 wrote:
Luckily, we have stop-having-fun guys to remind us that having anything more than 60 cards in your deck is tantamount to being a rapist and anyone considering it should be strung up by their ****.
@OP: a question for you: name any kind of competition/competive game/sport where having more money does not give you an advantage?

(excluding those that work entirely on chance, like "coin flipping" etc)
 
~ Tim


Chess?


You arent the OP but you fell for it anyway. ;)

A millionaire chess player can afford to travel to any tournament he wants, can retire from work do dedicate his whole day to practicing, can hire the best grand masters in the world to train him, can afford top of the range chess computers to play against, all the books, DVDs, etc that teach you how to play, and will have an edge over a poorer player.

Want to try another one? ;)

~ Tim       
EDIT: my point is that even though in chess all pieces and sets are identical ingame (you cant "buy a win" by purchasing a super queen that can teleport etc), money can still give you an edge.
Limited Magic evens the playing field a bit compared to Constructed, but still not entirely, as richer players can afford to enter more events and practice more, and can afford to pass up more money rares in order to build a game winning deck etc. 


No, I knew the potential response was there, I just assumed you would't reply with it, because it's a stupid one. Buying an advantage is about how you can outweight skill with money.

Yxoque wrote:
This forum can't even ****ing self-destruct properly.

IMAGE(http://img.pokemondb.net/sprites/black-white/anim/normal/plusle.gif)

Investing more will help your chances: RDW build on a $20 budget won't be as good as one given $60 to play with or so on

But you can beat a more expensive deck with a cheaper one.  A cheap RDW has historically been able to take on far more expensive builds with decent reliability.

More money does = more winning, but the corrolation is not so strong as some people say.

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If you can manage to build a brew and pilot it really well, then can take you a long way.  Last standard format, I played U/R Delver a large chunk of time during the format and when bonfire came out, I was instantly sold on it.  Trouble was, my local store didn't have it in stock at the time and when they did, it was already a $30+ card.  I managed to get two of them off of store credit from doing well at FNM and the third from a lucky pack.

Just figure out a strategy that can work within your budget and work on it.  With a little bit of luck and  some good piloting of your deck, you might take your brew far enough in your local meta to actually win reasonably often.
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Here's a budget deck I ran across that seems to be somewhat competitive if you learn to play it right.  Total cost = about $15 at TCGPlayer mid.



Mostly commons and uncommons, with a few cheap rares.  Notice the synergy amongst the cards though.  It can be done.
A good player can do well with a mediocre deck. I play GB Fight Club, a $200 deck, for two weeks and while it took awhile to get the hang of it, I eventually got 1st with it. I've moved up to playing Junk Reanimator though, a $500 deck, however I traded for every single card in it. I have placed more since switching though.
Money doesn't buy the win- it's no substitute for skill. However, to make an analogy, a good artist will paint better with an expensive brush than with a child's watercolor set, and a carpenter will build things faster with power tools than with a handsaw. Money allows you access to the tools that let you utilize your skills to greater potential.
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Whether most people want to admit it or not, $$$=wins. Everyone who plays a <$100 homebrew deck has had to sit across the table from a guy with an $800 Naya midrange deck and had to experience the feeling of carefully choosing their plays in vain while watching the other player mindlessly empty their hand, crushing you under their wave of Thragtusks and Hellkites.
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Isn't that what we have Rare-B-Gone for?
TCGs are all like this- the best cards cost more money.

If you want to cry about money, you chose the wrong game to get competetive with. 

(at)MrEnglish22

Whether most people want to admit it or not, $$$=wins. Everyone who plays a <$100 homebrew="" deck="" has="" had="" to="" sit="" across="" the="" table="" from="" a="" guy="" with="" an="" 800="" naya="" midrange="" and="" experience="" feeling="" of="" carefully="" choosing="" their="" plays="" in="" vain="" while="" watching="" other="" player="" mindlessly="" empty="" hand="" crushing="" you="" under="" wave="" thragtusks="" hellkites="" quote="" br="" class="mbQuoteSpacer">


Well, everyone who plays against such people. Avoid tournaments and you'll avoid such decks as well.
Whether most people want to admit it or not, $$$=wins.



Budget aggro decks have a long history of doing well in tournaments.

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Whether most people want to admit it or not, $$$=wins.



Budget aggro decks have a long history of doing well in tournaments.



I never meant that a well-built deck piloted by a good player can't win. It's just that as long as you know the rules of the game and are willing to throw a few hundred dollars at a deck, you can do basically as well as said aggro decks. Anyone who denies that either never plays competitive Magic, or are those people who use disposable income to fill in their skill gaps.
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I think skill has more to do with how difficult your deck is to play. I would argue that it takes more concentration and thus more skill to play control over aggro. If you have to consider the cards your opponent plays more than the cards you want to play, you need to have a greater grasp of the game. If you play aggro and are aiming to win on turn 5 or earlier, your game plan is pretty simple in comparison and I believe it takes less skill to pilot such a deck. The more your deck is a "goldfish" deck, the less skill it takes to use it correctly.

Money doesn't equate to skill but it will help your deck. I built a variation of Nico Christiansen's Naya Humans deck that runs fairly smoothly and is very budget friendly. I replaced Champion of the Parish with Boros Elite and the deck doesn't seem to suffer much from it but would that deck be better with Champion instead? Absolutely. If I dumped cash on Shock Lands instead of Gates, would my deck be more efficient and have a greater win record? You bet.

putting money into your deck usually makes it run more smoothly and makes it easier to play. I definitely feel that while no deck is perfect, if someone hands you an incredible deck you will probably do well with it despite your skill level. It all depends on how deep you want to go and for me, 6 shock lands (or more) at $12-15 a piece is too deep.

EDH decks I play:

 

Prossh: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4101381

 

Derevi: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4115936

 

Kaalia (the beats)

 

Zur (disgusting combo)

 

Damia (Bug Elf deck)

 

Numot (Stax)

 

Griselbrand (French)

 

Ghave (Uber combo)

 

Muzzio (Oops, Blightsteel)

Whether most people want to admit it or not, $$$=wins.



Budget aggro decks have a long history of doing well in tournaments.



I never meant that a well-built deck piloted by a good player can't win. It's just that as long as you know the rules of the game and are willing to throw a few hundred dollars at a deck, you can do basically as well as said aggro decks. Anyone who denies that either never plays competitive Magic, or are those people who use disposable income to fill in their skill gaps.


It's more than cards and rules knowledge.

Scope my YouTube channel!

Here's a shout out for Scholars' Books & Games in Bridgewater, MA, and for Paladin's Place in Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany where I was stationed for two years. Support your FLGS!

Attacking the darkness since 1987, turning creatures sideways since 1994.

Money is necessary but not sufficient.
It is a myth that control is harder to play than aggro.

Indeed, the empirical evidence (most pros are control or combo players, there are comparatively few Aggro specialists) would suggest that it is generally harder to play Aggro.
I would say I have a fair bit of skill that most don't and its sorta 50% on both ends, having money does help even if it is for the second tier cards.
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57307308 wrote:
Yes, but DOES HE PEE COLOURLESS MANA?
144543765 wrote:
144018173 wrote:
Serra Angel Serra Sphinx Serra Spider Though Vigilance is a poor fit for red, so I'm not sure if we'll ever see Serra Dragon. I could see Serra Demon, though.
Black Serra creature would have vigilance and fear. It would basically be Batman.
[//sblock]
It is a myth that control is harder to play than aggro. Indeed, the empirical evidence (most pros are control or combo players, there are comparatively few Aggro specialists) would suggest that it is generally harder to play Aggro.


Pros don't play decks for the difficulty or lack thereof in running them, they play them because they win. You had a premise and interpreted your data in such a manner as to force it to support that premise. This is very much akin to the Pastafarian idea that a lack of pirates causes global warming.

The only thing the data suggests is that combo and control are more consistent than aggro.

Scope my YouTube channel!

Here's a shout out for Scholars' Books & Games in Bridgewater, MA, and for Paladin's Place in Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany where I was stationed for two years. Support your FLGS!

Attacking the darkness since 1987, turning creatures sideways since 1994.

on the other hand, if I recall correctly, they did a test a while back and found that the aggro mirror was the most skill-intensive. I'm winging the methodology a bit here, but as I recall, the idea was that you take two players, then have them play a match-up a bunch of times, then switch and play the same match-up again but with the opposite decks. the wider the win margin between players, the more skill-intensive the match. for instance, if my deck beats yours 60% of the time, that doesn't tell us anything. but if I win the matchup 60% of the time, from either side, that tells us how skill-intensive the matchup is. repeat with other match-ups, and see which one rewards the more skilled player more often. you can then repeat the experiments with different players to gather more broad data.

aggro v. aggro is a very difficult game to play, as you have to constantly evaluate which of their cards threaten you for the most damage, when to race, when to try to slow them down, which cards to trade for what, and so on. aggro v. control is a fairly simple game, since you just throw down everything and try to kill them before they stabilize, and if you don't you just hope to topdeck burn, but even maximizing damage output can take skill.

 

120.6. Some effects replace card draws.

 

why are you here when NGA exists and is just better

Money buys cards, not skill.



To an extent, most certainly.  Still, there is something to be said about money wins. 

As an example, at the local GTC game-day event three out of five games I played was against effectively the same deck, (WUR I want to say).  Probably of feature of the month deck, from what I heard won some big event (I don't keep tabs on these things).  One guy was damn good at running the deck, and obviously did his homework on it.  Thrashed my mono-red build up and down the floor without breaking a sweat.  Another knew how the deck worked, but didn't know how to play it as well or what to side in against aggro.  Still lost against him, but it wasn't the thrashing I got in the first game.  Third match was against an obvious copy-paste job where the guy didn't bother learning how the deck functioned.  He *barely* won out on that one, despite his level of skill rather than because of it. 

Didn't help that the top 8 table was populated entirely, from with a couple of exceptions, by that exact same build. 

So money decks most certainly will pull you forward a bit.  But that's not the end of it.  I've beaten several $500 standard decks with my $20 Mono-Red deck. 



What's important is knowing how your deck functions, knowing your options, and more importantly knowing your local meta.  I've seen obvious copy-paste jobs from some recent winning deck on the PT or GP that gets thrashed because the person didn't know what they were doing with it.
all I'm saying is, I play Grixis control and I have to think more. I have to decide "is this the spell I want to counter?" "is this the creature I want to destroy?" My Naya Aggro deck? all I think about is "SMASH!". It takes skill to pilot either one to victory but I feel like Aggro has a very straightforward gameplan that does not change much vs. a Control deck which is essentially dealing with each threat in turn and has to be mindful of everything, all the time.

You can't just netdeck and hope to win but if you know the story your deck is trying to tell, you should do alright. Some tales are easier to tell and certainly "SMASH!" falls into the category of easy stories.

EDH decks I play:

 

Prossh: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4101381

 

Derevi: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4115936

 

Kaalia (the beats)

 

Zur (disgusting combo)

 

Damia (Bug Elf deck)

 

Numot (Stax)

 

Griselbrand (French)

 

Ghave (Uber combo)

 

Muzzio (Oops, Blightsteel)

Well, my belief is that no archetype is intrinsically more skillful to pilot than another; the skills required for each archetype differ. It's not that Archetype A needs more skill, just different.

The point I tried to make, albeit unclearly, is that if you just take the number of players recognized as skilled that favour each archetype, and make the loose assumption that players will not choose decks that are harder to play purely because they are harder to play, then the relative scarcity of Aggro-favouring legends supports the inference that Aggro decks are harder to play to success on average.

Which is mathematically true, but not actually useful in determining true comparibility of archetypes.

I personally find Control easier to play because identifying value comes easily to me, I'm good at estimating how much I can risk.

There's also a Control deck advantage that each turn of the game that occurs means you're on average more favoured, and that Control spells are often so powerful that you can recover from mistakes.
There are a lot of very good budget decks that you can make.  But "very good" is going to have a hard time beating Naya Rush at a Grand Prix.  So the answer is yes, but only at the very highest levels of play. You can definitely place in an FNM with a budget deck, I do it all the time.
Well, my belief is that no archetype is intrinsically more skillful to pilot than another; the skills required for each archetype differ. It's not that Archetype A needs more skill, just different. The point I tried to make, albeit unclearly, is that if you just take the number of players recognized as skilled that favour each archetype, and make the loose assumption that players will not choose decks that are harder to play purely because they are harder to play, then the relative scarcity of Aggro-favouring legends supports the inference that Aggro decks are harder to play to success on average. Which is mathematically true, but not actually useful in determining true comparibility of archetypes. I personally find Control easier to play because identifying value comes easily to me, I'm good at estimating how much I can risk. There's also a Control deck advantage that each turn of the game that occurs means you're on average more favoured, and that Control spells are often so powerful that you can recover from mistakes.



I completely agree. I am, by my nature, a defensive player and I would rather play control any day of the week. I just feel like a deck that runs a goldfish mentality (i.e. not concerned with the other person as much as what they're doing) is easier to pick up and play. I just have fewer choices to make every turn because I'm not relying on cues from my opponent.

EDH decks I play:

 

Prossh: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4101381

 

Derevi: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4115936

 

Kaalia (the beats)

 

Zur (disgusting combo)

 

Damia (Bug Elf deck)

 

Numot (Stax)

 

Griselbrand (French)

 

Ghave (Uber combo)

 

Muzzio (Oops, Blightsteel)

I find it amusing that people are complaining that their 100 $ decks are at an advantage against the opponent's 500 $ decks. Of course it is. Just like your 100 $ deck seems unbeatable to someone who only ever buys boosters and built his deck based on his kitchen table meta. It's not that people who spend a lot of money on the game are somehow evil or whatever. And while money generally equates more good cards, that doesn't necessarily lead to a good deck. Take all the most expensive cards in the format and what is it? A miserable pile of unplayability. As Escef said, cheap aggro decks can often be built in a format and succeed, because the best components tend to be cheap and accessible. Is it an advantage to have more disposable income? Of course it is. But if you've gotten to the point where you're buying singles, you should already know that. You can never blame your losses entirely on that, though. As I said, more expensive decks aren't necessarily better. Sure, every format has a "buy-in", a minimum amount of money that you will need to spend in order for your deck to be effective. Most sports and game clubs also have a membership fee. Same thing, in my opinion. Nothing to complain about.
Take all the most expensive cards in the format and what is it? A miserable pile of unplayability.


this intrigued me. what are those cards, and what would that deck look like?

I decided to use SCG's prices for Mint/Near Mint to determine this. I also only looked at rares and mythics, because the cheapest card wound up being $18, and I can't imagine an uncommon or common costing that much. anyway, I decided I'd take the top 9 most expensive cards in standard and run 4 of each. they are, in order:

Liliana of the Veil-$45
Huntmaster of the Fells-$30
Thundermaw Hellkite-$30
Sphinx's Revelation-$25
Geist of Saint Traft-$25
Bonfire of the Damned-$25
Snapcaster Mage-$25
Restoration Angel-$20

astute counters may notice that that's only 8. unfortunately, there's a 4-way tie for the ninth most expensive, between Falkenrath Aristocrat, Jace, Memory Adept, Domri Rade, and Boros Reckoner. I'll leave that door open, but may just fill the slot with one of each because I'm not trying to build a good deck here.

for lands, the most logical thing to do is 4 cavern of souls and 2 of each shockland, or alternatively one of each shock and one of each checkland. so the final deck is as follows, sorted by curve:



Imma goldfish this, see how it works.

ALSO: not making any sort of point here, just struck by a whim.

120.6. Some effects replace card draws.

 

why are you here when NGA exists and is just better