A warlock, that worships Bahamut...

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Not exactly sure if this would go here.

Now, I'm one who from time to time enjoys the ideas that bend rules and go against the typical/usual/majority-of-such ideas. In fact, one idea for a character(actually, his whole clan)in a story I've had in the works for the past decade, is(and I found I'm not alone in this idea)a good vampire who is also a Christian.

That aside, I do often smile at the ideas like that, and I find the idea of a Bahamut-worshiping warlock just as ammusing, and fairly intriguing. Is that at all odd? I know that pretty much any class these days can be of any alignment(a lawful-good thief would really be odd though), but how would Bahamut view a warlock worshiping him?
Not exactly sure if this would go here.

Now, I'm one who from time to time enjoys the ideas that bend rules and go against the typical/usual/majority-of-such ideas. In fact, one idea for a character(actually, his whole clan)in a story I've had in the works for the past decade, is(and I found I'm not alone in this idea)a good vampire who is also a Christian.

That aside, I do often smile at the ideas like that, and I find the idea of a Bahamut-worshiping warlock just as ammusing, and fairly intriguing. Is that at all odd? I know that pretty much any class these days can be of any alignment(a lawful-good thief would really be odd though), but how would Bahamut view a warlock worshiping him?



As one of millions and millions of ants, no more surprising or deserving of notice than any other.

With the number of devoutly religious criminals in the real world, it's always weird to me when people find it hard to believe alignment discrepancy between a character and his/her deity.  

Beyond that, there is nothing at all inherently evil or even unlawful about warlocks (or even thieves). And I don't just mean in a "morality is a societal construct" sort of way, but rather in a, "class has nothing to do with occupation, demeanor, alignment, or religion" sense.  They're simply not related at all.

 A warlock is someone who has gained magical power from another source. That is all.  Even the pacts that explicitly state where the power is coming from can be refluffed in any way you want to. I've seen people refluff infernal pact as a pact to bahamut, which makes it have much in common with standard divine fluff, with the warlock's power granted by his deity. 

Bahamut may not approve of a stock-fluffed infernal or star pact, but why would he notice it? Why would a warlock who chooses to call himself a follower of bahamut make an agreement with a demon/abomination? Does the end justify the means? Is he greedy/secretive? Trying to con the pact-patron in some way? There's hundreds of viable reasons, without even changing the fluff (which is readily changeable).

There's no rules bending going on at all, and I think most people are in agreement with you that such dichotomies are often interesting.


As one of millions and millions of ants, no more surprising or deserving of notice than any other.



Yep.  There's no longer a 'direct line' of any sort between people and the gods, not even for divine-power-source characters.  Bahamut wouldn't even know your guy existed.

A warlock is someone who has gained magical power from another source. That is all.  Even the pacts that explicitly state where the power is coming from can be refluffed in any way you want to.



You can even refluff the pacts out entirely.
  And people can end up with "pacts" without ever having agreed to anything. (Fey are the most likely to grant power to someone on a whim, but it can happen with some of the others too.)

  Even sticking to the default fluff in all ways possible, there's nothing particularly villainous about the vestige pact, and the White Well pact has an element of nobility about it, to the point that it might actually be seen as a worthy cause under Bahamut's doctrines.
I'm loving this game more and more Cool .

On a side note to warlocks; PHB1 has them only wearing cloth and leather, whereas Heroes of the Forgotten Kingdoms has them all the way up to chain. Which is it?
I'm loving this game more and more  .

On a side note to warlocks; PHB1 has them only wearing cloth and leather, whereas Heroes of the Forgotten Kingdoms has them all the way up to chain. Which is it?



Hexblades are intended to mix it up in melee, so they need a little extra oomph in the armor department.

 PHB warlocks might also take Armor Proficiency: Chainmail if they're dumping Int (which most often occurs with Star Pact warlocks).
  And people can end up with "pacts" without ever having agreed to anything. (Fey are the most likely to grant power to someone on a whim, but it can happen with some of the others too.)

  Even sticking to the default fluff in all ways possible, there's nothing particularly villainous about the vestige pact, and the White Well pact has an element of nobility about it, to the point that it might actually be seen as a worthy cause under Bahamut's doctrines.



Where can I find info on the White Well Pact? I tried looking in the DDI Character Creator, but I couldn't find it.
The White Well pact is described under the Hexblade variant of the warlock and the associated Dragon article ( www.wizards.com/dnd/Article.aspx?x=dnd/d... ). For the PHB warlock it would use the existing Fey pact with a focus on radiant powers rather than cold ones.

Essentially, there are several different versions of the Fey pact depending on the specific patron. Two of the common ones are the Prince of Frost (cold) and the White Well (radiant). The Hexblade warlock explicitly separates them into separate builds/powers, while the PHB warlock's Fey pact is a catch-all.
The White Well pact is described under the Hexblade variant of the warlock and the associated Dragon article ( www.wizards.com/dnd/Article.aspx?x=dnd/d... ). For the PHB warlock it would use the existing Fey pact with a focus on radiant powers rather than cold ones. Essentially, there are several different versions of the Fey pact depending on the specific patron. Two of the common ones are the Prince of Frost (cold) and the White Well (radiant). The Hexblade warlock explicitly separates them into separate builds/powers, while the PHB warlock's Fey pact is a catch-all.



Even more intriguing; an obsidian-skinned tiefling winning the favor, and even the heart, of the creamy white Lady of the White Well Smile.
Is there a way to reskin Eldritch Bolt to a radiant attack, or would that be overkill(since I heard radiant is one of the hardest hitting forms)?

Or do hexblades use Eldritch Bolt?
You could, but that'd take it into houserule territory.  Radiant is way better than Force, most of the time.

That said, Hexblades do use Eldritch Bolt, but they don't use it all that much.  They're very much more designed around melee, with Eldritch Bolt as a decent ranged alternative when the need arises.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
I think there are a holy symbol that turn all your implement attacks to radiant damage (hexblade melee attacks are both implement AND weapon, so it applies to those too)...i am not sure...you could mc into a divine class and get that implement.

Be warned, the character builders goes kinda crazy on the hexblade when you use other implements that aren't rod and wand, even more if you use a superior implement 
One concern(still a bit of one, but not as much any more);

White Well Pact level 25 power, is that a feature or a power I must trade out a lower power for?

Dragon Magazine #393, page 39.

If I must trade a lower power for it, though it is available(maybe even comes with the White Well Pact), I will. I have it ready to take the place of Curse of the Golden Mist.

I always get nervous about trading out powers Smile
 PHB warlocks might also take Armor Proficiency: Chainmail if they're dumping Int (which most often occurs with Star Pact warlocks).



Assuming those Star pact warlocks are only allowed to use the PHB, and they don't have any use for their awesome riders...

The realistic concept of a split'lock died like 2 years ago. And with semi-recent errata (september '12 iirc), all of the powers from Master of Starry Night use the player's choice of Con or Cha. So there really is no reason at all to do this to yourself anymore.
FWIW [4e designer] baseline assumption was that roughly 70% of your feats would be put towards combat effectiveness, parties would coordinate, and strikers would do 20/40/60 at-will damage+novas. If your party isn't doing that... well, you are below baseline, so yes, you need to optimize slightly to meet baseline. -Alcestis
On the note of mutable fluff:

I had a player make an Infernal Pact Warlock with completely non-core fluff.

He was a member of a specific sect of Sehanine that existed in a semi-secret shrine outside his home city.  The membes of this shrine had, at one point, defeated (but not killed) a very powerful devil.  This devil is now imprisoned deep within the shrine.  Certain members of the sect are selected to undergo a special ritual that siphons some of the power off of the devil, thus imbuing the character with Infernal Warlock powers.  As those warlocks gain power, more power is siphoned off the devil.  However, if/when those warlocks die, that power is returned to the devil, so once they are invested with the power, they are sent into a willing exile away from their homes, to make it harder for any of the devil's minions to locate all the warlocks of that sect and wipe them out.  Because if the devil got enough of his power back, he might escape his bonds.

So there you go.  You can have even an Infernal Pact, who is good and even a loyal member of the faith of a Good or LG faith.

Please, feel free to poach this idea, piecemeal or whole cloth.
The membes of this shrine had, at one point, defeated (but not killed) a very powerful devil.  This devil is now imprisoned deep within the shrine.  Certain members of the sect are selected to undergo a special ritual that siphons some of the power off of the devil, thus imbuing the character with Infernal Warlock powers.  As those warlocks gain power, more power is siphoned off the devil.  



Interestingly, there's actually a Vestige Warlock Paragon Path with very similar fluff to this this(Umbral Cabalist if you're curious.)
The membes of this shrine had, at one point, defeated (but not killed) a very powerful devil.  This devil is now imprisoned deep within the shrine.  Certain members of the sect are selected to undergo a special ritual that siphons some of the power off of the devil, thus imbuing the character with Infernal Warlock powers.  As those warlocks gain power, more power is siphoned off the devil.  



Interestingly, there's actually a Vestige Warlock Paragon Path with very similar fluff to this this(Umbral Cabalist if you're curious.)


Was not aware of this.  This was my player's 1st 4e character, so this was back when the PHB1 was the only book, Martial Power hadn't even been out yet.  The guy only played the character until about level 8, and then he moved away to another base.  Truth be told, I haven't looked into Vestige Pact yet, because I wasn't engaged by the fluff.

I am, however, a big fan of wildly deviating fluff.

Had a player 2 years ago make a World Speaker Shaman.  His character had been a young man, married with a child in a small frontier town.  Hiw wife and child were buthcered by gnolls, and he only survived because some adventurers saved him.  He became a hermit for over 15 years, living alone in a hut, and slowly going crazy (at least he thought he was), talking to a rock.  When the rock started talking back to him, he was sure he was going insane.  Eventually, the rock managed to convince him that he was NOT, in fact, crazy, but was one of the select few who were "spirit talkers", and that the Primal Spirits needed him to go back out into the world and be a voice for the Primal Spirits.  He finally took up his old armor and spear and ventured back out into the world.  The fact that the first people he ran into were a druid and a barbarian-who immediately recognized his spirit companion for what it was-helped to further convince him that he was not crazy.  The rock he spoke to was his Spirit Companion (since the World Speaker's companion is a physical composition of earth and plants, instead of a ghostly animal).  I was a huge fan of his backstory, because it was completly different from what one would expect from a Shaman character.
[ruth be told, I haven't looked into Vestige Pact yet, because I wasn't engaged by the fluff.


I'm not in love with the fluff, so my current character just has him drawing on the power of hero's past and the spirits of the Feywild.

It was mostly the mechanics that brought me in. Where another Warlock has one pact boon/feature, the Warlock gets 2 to start with and can use dailies to swap out boons as the situation calls for it. 


I was a huge fan of his backstory, because it was completly different from what one would expect from a Shaman character.



Definetly a very interesting read. I remember wanting to play some sort of Shaman once, but I never got a chance and forgot the fluff I was going to use. I do have a Revenant Desert Wind Monk on hand with mostly fire powers. His deal is that he's the spirit of a long dead dragon, bound to human form as some punishment and forced to wander the earth. His abilites are his attempts to focus his mind and redeem himself, and his dragonic abilities asserting themselves.

That, and I have a whole laundry list of refluffing that explains why my Vryloka Blackguard is perfectly viable in an entirely science fiction space campaign. 
A warlock, that worships Bahamut...

... walks into a bar and says "Is it hot in here?"  And the bartender says "Yeah, so shut your mouth."

(rimshot)  

Thanks folks, I'll be here all week.  Try the veal. 

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