Beyond Bodily Brutality: the Basics of Building Battleminds

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Personally, I'm a fan of a halfling battlemind with a longsword.  Again you take Scrappy and SWD.  With Heavy Blade Expertise and Quicksilver Demon you have +8 AC vs OAs and +6 NADs vs OAs, meaning you can LR with impunity.  Add to that being able to move through large and larger creature's spaces and you have a mobile defender that can't be pinned down.
As far as I can see, the weapon of choice for the halfling is actually the War Pick.  With Pick Expertise, Scrappy, and Small Warrior's Defense, you now have a +2, 1d8+3/5/7 weapon at no penalty in AC or Reflex.  Ignoring accuracy, that's average damage of 7.5/9.5/11.5.  For comparison, the gouge is also +2 with average damage of 8.  Obviously that's a bit of an unfair comparison, as the feat support for gouges is miles better, but a halfling can use picks to pile on damage while keeping his AC and Reflex up. 

Oh wow... Small Warrior's Defense IS pretty damn awesome.  Would make a Waraxe worth using as well.

And you're definitely on the nose with the Warpick.  So glad Mordenkainen's finally gave us some awesome Pick support: its trickledown effects rock.

A longsword QD halfling is great when it's running, I agree.  The reason the pick has changed the halfling's rating and the longsword didn't, for what it's worth, is that the war pick works reasonably well without any investment.  A halfling really needs SWD before a longsword is a viable option, so you either start with another weapon or suffer from badly below-par defences (or, of course, start at level 2 or later).  While the war pick doesn't really shine until you have Scrappy and SWD, the Small property takes a lot of pressure off you in choosing your first few feats.  Same argument applies to a waraxe, etc.
A longsword QD halfling is great when it's running, I agree.  The reason the pick has changed the halfling's rating and the longsword didn't, for what it's worth, is that the war pick works reasonably well without any investment.  A halfling really needs SWD before a longsword is a viable option, so you either start with another weapon or suffer from badly below-par defences (or, of course, start at level 2 or later).  While the war pick doesn't really shine until you have Scrappy and SWD, the Small property takes a lot of pressure off you in choosing your first few feats.  Same argument applies to a waraxe, etc.



Oh absolutely.  I mostly just stumbled upon the combo while trying to make a halfling battlemind after they got the optional CON bonus.  I also like the longsword for HBO, which the pick cannot get.

So the pick is more damaging, but the longsword can make you much stickier.
So confession time: I am unlikely to pick up the Book of Vile Darkness.  I will keep an eye out for material out of the book which would be appropriate for the handbook, but without the book in hand any advice or pointers people can provide regarding BoVD material would be greatly appreciated.

Also: sorry about the broken sblocks, no fix obvious yet. 
So confession time: I am unlikely to pick up the Book of Vile Darkness.  I will keep an eye out for material out of the book which would be appropriate for the handbook, but without the book in hand any advice or pointers people can provide regarding BoVD material would be greatly appreciated.

Also: sorry about the broken sblocks, no fix obvious yet. 

To be fair, I don't think a lot would be missing from this guide without incorporating Vile Darkness.  Nothing's really looking spectacular in that Book.
Don't forget the Goblin Totem enchantment - for all your high-damage small-character needs.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
So confession time: I am unlikely to pick up the Book of Vile Darkness.  I will keep an eye out for material out of the book which would be appropriate for the handbook, but without the book in hand any advice or pointers people can provide regarding BoVD material would be greatly appreciated.

Also: sorry about the broken sblocks, no fix obvious yet. 

To be fair, I don't think a lot would be missing from this guide without incorporating Vile Darkness.  Nothing's really looking spectacular in that Book.

There's several ways of moving attacks around.  Reverse lightning rush can be very useful if the team is setup right.

Admittedly, less so for battleminds then other defenders (unless you get rapid mindspike, prescent spike, and the "slide 1" spike, and other possible boosts).

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

I noticed that this guide is still being maintained as a LR+OA combo.  I would like to present a complete argument using keywords and referencing all rules against the Lightning Rush + Opportunity Attack combo.  While I would love to have OA's after LR, especially with Heavy Blade Opp (goddamn!), I recently spent a ton of time digging into interrupts (for none other than mind spike... but that's already another thread) and found that the triggers do not line up.

Let's start with the following rules on immediate actions:


  1. Immediate Action: Interrupt (PHB 268) - An immediate interrupt lets you jump in when a certain trigger condition arises, acting before the trigger resolves

  2. Further clarification on the definition of "Trigger" - (via) Immediate Action: Reaction (PHB 268) - The triggering action, event, or condition occurs...

#1 is just a baseline rule to build the argument.
#2 defines the trigger as a set of both defined ("action") and undefined ("event", "condition") terms.  Due to the lack of definition, it is saying all triggers are explicitly defined and are their own definition.  It is nothing more and nothing less than exactly what is written on the power card.

Now, lets take a look at the trigger (PHB3 49):


  •  An enemy within 5 squares of you targets an ally with an attack


Then lets look at the attack sequence (PHB 269):

  1. Choose the attack you'll use.  Each attack has an attack type

  2. Choose targets for the attack.  Check whether you can see and target your enemies.

  3. make an attack roll

  4. Compare your attack roll to the target's defense

  5. Deal damage and apply other effects

So, turn of events for Lightning Rush:
1. Opponent chooses attack being used
2. Chooses targets
BM Interrupt - LR interrupts targeting -> LR interrupts 2.
LR resolves (After 1 but before 2, 3, 4 and 5)

Now, at this point, we ask ourselves: Do we get an OA?  So what are the rules for OA:


  • Opportunity Action: The Generic rule covering opportunity actions.

  • Opportunity Attack: The Specific overruling rule dealing with the subset of Opportunity Actions known as Opportunity Attacks.


So, what does Opportunity Attack say (PHB 290):


  • Ranged and Area Powers Provoke: If an enemy adjacent to you uses a ranged power or an area power, you can make an opportunity attack against that enemy.


What step of the attack sequence has the keyword use required to trigger the Opportunity Attack?  Step 1.
At the time LR has resolved where you are now adjacent, where are we in the attack sequence? After Step 1, before Step 2.

So, the use portion of the provocation has already passed by the time Lightning Rush both triggers and resolves to satisfy the adjacency portion of the provocation.  As such, the 2 portions of the provoke trigger are never met at any single instance of time.
OA does not trigger. 


Then lets look at the attack sequence (PHB 269):

  1. Choose the attack you'll use.  Each attack has an attack type.


What step of the attack sequence has the keyword use required to trigger the Opportunity Attack?  Step 1.





Quoting the relevant bits from your post...

There is a problem with your argument.  You think step 1 says that you use the power.  What it actually says is that you choose the power you will use.  These are not equivalent.  What is actually considered to be "using" the power isn't explicitly defined, as far as I know, and thus the debate over whether or not you can get an OA after LR (I say debate, but it is generally accepted within the community that you can).

One could just as easily argue the opposite view from yours.  Because step 1 uses "you'll use", a contraction of "you will use", which is future tense, step 1 is explicitly NOT using the attack.  Additionally, each of steps 2-5 could be considered collectively as "using" the attack, and so if one is adjacent during any of those steps the enemy could provoke an OA.
Step 1 indeed does not satisfy the "Power is being used", as it mentions the future tense there.  After Step 1 concludes and resolves, THEN the power is being used.
You think step 1 says that you use the power.  What it actually says is that you choose the power you will use.  These are not equivalent.  What is actually considered to be "using" the power isn't explicitly defined, as far as I know, and thus the debate over whether or not you can get an OA after LR (I say debate, but it is generally accepted within the community that you can).


Interesting, I'd missed the future tense there.
But if Step #1 isn't the "use", I would argue that neither is 2, as it is once again prep for usage.  Based on that same logic, the wording "for the attack" indicates that the attack has not started yet in Step 2, and so technically, neither has being actually targeted.  You've only chosen what to target, but you've not actually targeted anything yet because the attack hasn't started.  As such, the use doesn't begin until Step 3, when both the "use" and "targeted" triggers would occur.

I just want to make sure I get all this clear, cause it has repercussions all over.
With the caveat that this isn't really how the system works, I would agree that LR basically occurs between step 2 and step 3 -- that is, upon the enemy choosing both the attack type and the target, which from the triggers for LR.  That tends to support the LR+OA combo.

Frankly, though, it's a bloody mess and I've rewritten the LR entry to make clear that there is a question as to the interaction of LR and OAs. 
With the caveat that this isn't really how the system works, I would agree that LR basically occurs between step 2 and step 3 -- that is, upon the enemy choosing both the attack type and the target, which from the triggers for LR.  That tends to support the LR+OA combo.

Frankly, though, it's a bloody mess and I've rewritten the LR entry to make clear that there is a question as to the interaction of LR and OAs. 


Well, at this point, my argument has been accurately countered and invalidated, which means unless new arguments are brought to the table, I believe LR+OA is valid.  I'm just trying to get clarification because one of my core assumptions was rendered invalid which has repercussions elsewhere.  This might not be the right place to do that thoughTongue Out
If you're taking the too-technical-for-consistency step-based interpretation, the OA trigger actually happens before the LR trigger, because OA is "uses a ranged power."

But assuming you're dealing with the interpretation that actually functions properly, the triggers still happen at the same time.  And while LR does resolve before its trigger resolves, it does not resolve before its trigger happens, which means that you are not in position to OA when the OA trigger happens in either interpretation.

It's worth noting that the consensus is that Step 1 in the RC Making Attacks sequence is when you use the power and when the power is considered expended.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
It's worth noting that the consensus is that Step 1 in the RC Making Attacks sequence is when you use the power and when the power is considered expended.


Do you have a page for the RC?  The only reference I can find is in the glossary - Page 308 - attack.  But it doesn't list steps.
The only place I've actually seen steps 1-5 listed is the PHB (p269).  I can't even find the step in the online compendium... 

If you're referring to the steps in the PHB, as countered by pete5528, the wording is clear that the "use" has not occurred yet in that step.  So as far as I can tell, the technical step based interpretation still supports LR+OA.
Forgive me if this has been discussed in this thread but outside the main guide. To get right to the point, if you want to rely on Mind Spike instead of Lightning Rush as your primary mark punishment, what options are there to make you, well, threatening with it? From your guide, it seems like the feats that increase Mind Spike are generally pretty bad, and as an auto-damage power similar to Magic Missile, there doesn't seem to be a lot we can do to indirectly improve it. Is the best option just to use sticky tricks to make sure that you're pretty much always going to be in range to use MS, then hope that its native damage (especially against MM3 monsters) is enough of a deterrent? To that end, are there any special strategies that you've found work especially well? I fully understand that Lightning Rush is the best mark punishment Battleminds have available to them, but just for kicks, I'm exploring what other options are out there, just to see something different.
MS isn't horrible.  It's actually kinda good with the MM3 monsters.  It's just not great.

As for improving it, well it depends on your DM and how often he provokes as to weather it's worth it., but the big 2 upgrade is precient strike + lure of iron.  You'll then get to negate some attacks since you can slide as an interupt.

Also, battlemind powers can do plenty to protect allies by themselves (lodestone lure), even if you never mark.


Though the most wicked combo i've come up with is blurred step + evermeet warlock (level 16) + planestrider boots + staff of the traveler + teleport booster(s).  They shift, you teleport, grab an ally, and teleport him away.  Oh, and you turn invisible for your troubles.

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

Forgive me if this has been discussed in this thread but outside the main guide. To get right to the point, if you want to rely on Mind Spike instead of Lightning Rush as your primary mark punishment, what options are there to make you, well, threatening with it?


As mellored said, Mind Spike is decent by itself.  My experience is that the trick to using Mind Spike effectively boils down primarily to two things: stickiness and target selection.  Stickiness is obvious for all the usual reasons.  The point of target selection is that Mind Spike is a credible threat in direct proportion to the damage potential of the monster.  Brutes and lurkers are great targets; controllers less so.

The most straightforward way to upgrade Mind Spike is through Conductive Defense.  Adding a shift is the other major upgrade.  Partly this is for the ability to interfere with multi-hits (or any attack, come epic and Prescient Retaliation), but also for Deadly Draw.  Effectively, you can think of this as making your standard attack part of your punishment through added accuracy.  Lure of Iron works here; you'll probably want to look at taking Wild Focus for Telekinetic Savant as well.

For a paragon path, I'd probably take Blackstone Guardian rather than Steel Ego.  The immobilisation helps a lot with stickiness issues, and Monolithic Vision frees up the Lure of Iron feat slot.  

One possible strategy that the sliding approach creates, by the way, is to remove the option of the enemy to choose Mind Spike.  That is, if you're as sticky as you should be, you can use the slides off Mind Spike to move the enemy away from your allies so that his only option is to attack you.  Invest in defences (Iron Fist is a good starting place), and neuter the enemy that way.

Lastly, keep in mind that there are very significant play differences between a Mind Spike battlemind and a "conventional" battlemind.  A Lightning Rush battlemind's zone of control makes him an effective party defender.  A Mind Spike battlemind, on the other hand, is much more in the vein of a single-target controller.  The need to keep enemies adjacent will prevent you from reliably defending against more than one enemy, and Blurred Step will make it very hard for you to act as any sort of wall.  Early on in each combat, try to use a 1 point augmented Battlemind's Demand to mark both your target of the moment and another enemy not as susceptible to Mind Spike, simply to spread the grief somewhat. 
MS isn't horrible.  It's actually kinda good with the MM3 monsters.  It's just not great.

As for improving it, well it depends on your DM and how often he provokes as to weather it's worth it., but the big 2 upgrade is precient strike + lure of iron.  You'll then get to negate some attacks since you can slide as an interupt.

Also, battlemind powers can do plenty to protect allies by themselves (lodestone lure), even if you never mark.


Though the most wicked combo i've come up with is blurred step + evermeet warlock (level 16) + planestrider boots + staff of the traveler + teleport booster(s).  They shift, you teleport, grab an ally, and teleport him away.  Oh, and you turn invisible for your troubles.

How would Planestrider Boots interact with Harrying Step, which doesn't explicitly bound the distance you teleport, only where you can teleport to?
How would Planestrider Boots interact with Harrying Step, which doesn't explicitly bound the distance you teleport, only where you can teleport to?

It would seem to be ambigious.  Personally, I'd rule that the distance restriction on the boots would effectively not exist, so you'd have two teleports, but both would need to end adjacent to the triggering enemy.   The only other possible interpretation would allow a first teleport that was arbitrary in direction and distance so long as you could end the second teleport adjacent to the triggering enemy, which is pretty bent.

I could also see it as having the distance defined in a per-use basis.  Say you're adjacent to your enemy, and he shifts one square away from you.  From this point, the maximum distance you could teleport would be three (to the far side of the enemy from your starting square).  This then becomes the distance that cannot be exceeded.  Which is not great, as I'm not sure that any teleport boosters could apply.

But it is definitely ambiguous, and you could make an argument for any of these.  The interpretation of no boundary, as long as the second teleport puts you adjacent to the shifting enemy, would be quite insane. 

Even the interpretation where both teleports must end adjacent to the enemy is delicious, as it's basically Mel's combo minus the staff and shift/teleport booster requirements.
Noticed an issue with Shadow Ally - it's not as powerful since it has to stay within range of you and needs to maintain line of effect...  As a defender / front line character, this means it's likely to be easily targeted at some point and destroyed...  Further, if you're using things like LR and bouncing around like a pinball, it may become more difficult to keep it in range at the end of your turn when the range check is enforced.



  • Shadow Ally (PHB3): Manifest the shadow ally at the beginning of combat, and then run him as far away as you can manage.  Presto: a utility that gives you +4 to all defences for an encounter. 


Shadow Ally is a conjuration - Conjuration rules indicate: (source: Compendium)



  • Movable Conjurations: If the power used to create a conjuration allows it to be moved, it’s a movable conjuration. At the end of the creator’s turn, a movable conjuration ends if the creator doesn’t have line of effect to at least 1 square of the conjuration or if the creator isn’t within range (using the power’s range) of at least 1 square of the conjuration.


Noticed an issue with Shadow Ally - it's not as powerful since it has to stay within range of you and needs to maintain line of effect...

Good catch, thank you very much.  That diminishes its value a lot, as far as I can see, and I've changed the rating to reflect that.

Sorry to nitpick at this point, but your new text doesn't feel quite accurate yet...Cool


  • quote: but between area-of-effect and multi-target attacks and minions who exist to waste their attacks on this sort of thing


Note that Conjurations normally can't be attacked, subject to specific text that says so in the power:


  • Creator’s Defenses: Normally, a conjuration cannot be attacked or physically affected. If a conjuration can be attacked or physically affected, it uses its creator’s defenses. Unless an attack specifically targets conjurations, only the attack’s damage (not including ongoing damage) affects the conjuration. For instance, an attack power that would cause a creature to take 20 cold damage and become immobilized would instead deal only the cold damage to a conjuration.


And shadow Ally says:


  • The duplicate can be targeted by melee attacks and ranged attacks, although it lacks hit points. The duplicate disappears if a melee or a ranged attack deals any damage to it.


I've brainstormed the following edge cases, feel free to discuss if you don't agree:


  • melee or ranged attack that only does ongoing will not destroy

  • melee or ranged attack that does dmg in the "hit", "miss" or "effect" blocks will destroy



Sorry to nitpick at this point, but your new text doesn't feel quite accurate yet...

I've taken out the reference to the area effects -- thank you again.  I'd agree with your breakdown of threatening attacks; the conjuration rules (unless I'm misreading them again!) specifically state that ongoing damage does not affect conjurations.

The immunity to area of effect spells do improve Shadow Ally a bit, but in my thinking not very much.  My experience is that fights break down into two main categories: ones with minions or other mooks who can be used to dissipate the shadow ally, or fights with relatively few creatures where the likelihood is relatively high they will have multi-target melee or ranged attacks.  And that latter case is really harmful for Shadow Ally, as it both prevents you from getting the defensive bonus and ends the power.
 
On the other hand, I suppose, Shadow Ally does have the benefit of always harmlessly negating one attack.  If it was an encounter power where the ally lasted EoNT I'd probably rate it blue.  Does anyone have play experience with Shadow Ally?  I think it would be a good thing to hear how it plays out.
Ok......... So call me a noob if you must, but I very much so want the Feat Resilient Demand how ever I need a "battle resilience power" feat before I can obtain it. So my question is, what is a battle resilience power feat

Thanks
The Battle Reslience power. It's one of yor 4 choices for th Battlemind Class feature with Persistant Harrier, Speed of Thought, and Wild Focus.
The Polearm Master PP essentially gives the Fighter's mark punishment (with boosted range) as its L16 feature. Given how bad Mind Spike is, and the stickiness gained from punishing shifts, I'd consider PM a pretty strong choice. Couple with Forceful Reversal for added fun.
The Polearm Master PP essentially gives the Fighter's mark punishment (with boosted range) as its L16 feature. Given how bad Mind Spike is, and the stickiness gained from punishing shifts, I'd consider PM a pretty strong choice. Couple with Forceful Reversal for added fun.

It's at quite an opportunity cost, though - you lose 2 Power Points, have two Strength-based powers you have to contend with, and must invest heavily in MBA and OA support. You also have to use a weapon that would deny you a shield bonus without further investment. Not a bad choice, but requires a bit too much setup for a Battlemind to excel with.

Definitely improves if you're a STR/CON character using WIS as a secondary, which is certainly feasible.
Yeah, I wouldn't call it a universal sky blue or anything...but if you're building in that direction already (half-elf taking an MBA at-will is a good choice anyway) then there's not much to beat it. It's about as good as Lightning Rush, without the power point drainage, so losing out on 2 PPs isn't as bad as it seems (those PPs would go straight into LR on many builds anyway).
There any way for a Battlemind to react to teleports? Only level 8, but we fought an enemy with an encounter teleport that he used to get away from me and felt kinda bad I couldn't chase after him.
There any way for a Battlemind to react to teleports? Only level 8, but we fought an enemy with an encounter teleport that he used to get away from me and felt kinda bad I couldn't chase after him.

Not particularly.  To be fair, teleports are the bane of pretty much every Defender's existence, though Battleminds and Wardens are the easiest at defending from range with their own At-Will immediates (Warden's Grasp / Lightning Rush).

Battleminds are great at preventing teleports, however - Lodestone Lure in particular disallows enemies from teleportnig/moving/anything to squares not adjacent to you, so smack a teleporter with that and you should be fine for the round.  Feystrike weapons work well also.
Ah, musta mssed that part. Will have to look at that.
I've been looking at MC'ing Psion and I actually think it is a pretty solid choice in some ways. Namely:
The usual. Predictive Defense for the +2 to all defenses against melee attacks.

The unusual. Dreamwalker. What Dreamwalker gives you in particular is what happens when Lightning Rush goes off. You summon up your Dreamform next to the creature who triggered Lightning Rush, you don't leave your mark and don't provoke OAs, your Dreamform smacks them, and get this - they have to attack someone who is quite likely 3-5 squares away from them.

With most melee attackers, this is basically a lost round for them. What's more, if someone doesn't actually try to kill your Dreamform, you can use Lightning Rush from that location, too, potentially making the range easily 8-10 squares away.

This is also ignoring the general purpose uses of simply hitting someone with Battlemind powers who you're not actually adjacent to, such as targets with Lodestone Lure who are 10 away from you and perhaps very unhappy to be unable to move adjacent to you and therefore unable to move at all.

Thoughts? Seems quite powerful.
The unusual. Dreamwalker. What Dreamwalker gives you in particular is what happens when Lightning Rush goes off. You summon up your Dreamform next to the creature who triggered Lightning Rush, you don't leave your mark and don't provoke OAs, your Dreamform smacks them, and get this - they have to attack someone who is quite likely 3-5 squares away from them.

Thoughts? Seems quite powerful.


That's where it goes wrong. LR requires you to move your speed to a square adjacent to the triggering enemy. 

Without that, the PP is pretty useless since you can't use the powers (INT-based implement attacks). 
The unusual. Dreamwalker. What Dreamwalker gives you in particular is what happens when Lightning Rush goes off. You summon up your Dreamform next to the creature who triggered Lightning Rush, you don't leave your mark and don't provoke OAs, your Dreamform smacks them, and get this - they have to attack someone who is quite likely 3-5 squares away from them.

Thoughts? Seems quite powerful.


That's where it goes wrong. LR requires you to move your speed to a square adjacent to the triggering enemy. 

Without that, the PP is pretty useless since you can't use the powers (INT-based implement attacks). 



Lightning Rush does not say you must move. If you move, you move adjacent. Most of the time, that's a requirement for Lightning Rush because the attack is a melee 1 power. But in this case, your Dreamform is right next to the target.

It isn't useless regardless. It means any time you spend power points, you can automatically use that power at a range of close burst 10. You're next to your mark and doing damage to your focus fire target. Lodestone Lure as an example.
Lightning Rush does not say you must move. If you move, you move adjacent. Most of the time, that's a requirement for Lightning Rush because the attack is a melee 1 power. But in this case, your Dreamform is right next to the target.

It isn't useless regardless. It means any time you spend power points, you can automatically use that power at a range of close burst 10. You're next to your mark and doing damage to your focus fire target. Lodestone Lure as an example.



Trigger: An enemy within 5 squares of you targets an ally with an attack

Effect: Before the attack, you move your speed to a square adjacent to the triggering enemy.



Not trying to be deliberately disagreeable here, but the wording is pretty clear in that the power has the effect that you move. Saying you can ignore this effect is like saying that Wizards don't have to damage and daze all targets in their area bursts, for example.

But Dreamwalker is a good PP for defenders, I'll give you that. Combining your dreamform with lockdown powers like LL is pretty nice. Still, the fact that you can't use the encounter or daily power effectively does hold it back.
Lightning Rush does not say you must move. If you move, you move adjacent. Most of the time, that's a requirement for Lightning Rush because the attack is a melee 1 power. But in this case, your Dreamform is right next to the target.

Your Dreamform might be... but you're not. You are not considered as occupying your Dreamform's square, and thus you need to satisfy the condition of Lightning Rush (moving to a square adjacent to the triggering target) before you can do anything.

You could just leave your dreamform next to whomever you were defending instead.