Open discussion: BUILD A CITY 4.0!!!

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Sorry I haven't been posting for a while. I have a new job, I've been spending more time with my family, and I've just started running what I hope to be my first long-running campaign.

Hey, no one is blaming you. Spending time with your family should take priority over gaming. Good luck with the new campaign. I just started my first 4E campaing week before last, and so far it has been a blast.

Speaking of my new 4E campaign, what have I learned from playing it? 4E is a lot higher fantasy than 3e was. This had a huge influence on my NPC creations for this thread.
The statblocks are very nice for our first step in blending with the new rules. We might want to combine ideas for the snapping tortoise. I like james's Iron Spine and Fling abilities, and I also like Pk's Stability and Pod Tactics/Mount abilities.

The problem with iron shell and the resist 5 damage entry is that when compared to say... a level 30 solo brute, this ability is HUGE! A good idea in general, but by having the AC of a soldier and the +2 elite bonus, the dire giant snapping tortoise is going to be difficult to hurt, especially with so many HP. As for the fling ability, I'm not sure it is thematically appropriate for a tortoise/turtle, and isn't really fitting with the soldier role.
I'm not so sure about giving Moses PC levels. For one thing, it detracts from our position earlier of an NPC-created city. Secondly, we've already decided that Moses is no longer a priest. Maybe she was a priest at some point, but through the revelation of Thorast, she has since lost her powers.

I'm not sure where the line between pc and npc is anymore. It really is pretty much gone. An NPC is really just the "monster" version of a PC class with less abilities/no feats/etc. So an NPC fighter is like a fighter, but without the extreem customization and abilities of a true fighter (like the warrior npc class from 3.5). In this way, I don't think that we really need to differentiate between the "NPC" of 4e and other monster race entries. Instead, we should differentiate between heroes/adventurers and non-heroic townsfolk. This is as much a function of roleplay and backstory as it is mechanics.
Excellent start though.

:D
Jeffers, Half-Elf Bouncer, Level 2 Soldier
Medium natural humanoid; XP 125

Initiative +4; Senses Perception +4; low-light vision
HP 39; Bloodied 19
Regeneration 5 (only when bloodied)
AC 18; Fortitude 14, Reflex 12, Will 16
Speed 5

IMAGE(http://www.ariagames.net/forums/images/smilies/bmelee.gif)Reaping Halberd (standard; at-will) * Weapon
Reach 2; +9 vs. AC; 1d10+3 damage; 3 damage on a miss; the target is marked until the end of Jeffers next turn.
IMAGE(http://www.ariagames.net/forums/images/smilies/melee.gif)Sentry Tactics (standard; at-will) * Martial, Weapon
Reach 2; +9 vs. AC; 1d10+3 damage; before Jeffers attacks, he lets one ally adjacent to either him or his target shift 1 square as a free action; the target is marked until the end of Jeffers next turn.
Shieldbearer Allies adjacent to Jeffers gain a +2 power bonus to AC.

Alignment Unaligned; Languages Common, Elven
Skills Diplomacy +3, Insight +11, Intimidate +6
Str 12 (+2) Dex 12 (+2) Wis 16 (+4)
Con 15 (+3) Int 10 (+1) Cha 10 (+1)
Equipment halberd, scale armor
Janis, Halfling Slinger, Level 1 Artillery (MM p.152); unaligned, replace "Thievery +10" with "Thievery +5", add "Nature +7", change Wisdom to 14 and Charisma to 11.
Helthal, Dwarf Hammerer, Level 5 Soldier (MM p. 97); unaligned.
Urchin Bandon, Human Lackey, Level 7 Minion (MM p. 162); unaligned, cloth armor.
I like having the tortoise as elite.

As to Iron Shell and Fling. I think fling fits in well with the soldier role. The soldier role is supposed to be most like the PC role of Defender (although it can work as Striker as well.) Combined with Stability and Pod Tactics, I feel that these two abilties cement the Soldier role.

Comparing Iron Shell to the Tarrasque's passive resistance is a little unfair. Iron Shell is a standard action, not a passive trait. It is a little high, maybe I'd tone the resistances to 3/15 instead of 5/20 to make it a little easier to fight.

Fling fits in perfectly fine. It could either be a headbutt or the turtle tossing a grabbed target.
I'm just not sure why a tortoise would have resistance to any of the damage types. Resistance 15 to psychic damage? The shell does warrant a high AC, but a soldier's base 16 AC is as high as it gets, combined with being level 8 and the +2 bonus for being elite, gives us a 26 AC at 8th level, when an 8th level fighter with 18 str and a +3 prof. weapon will have an attack bonus around +12, which means he still needs a 14 or better just to hit it. Combine that with almost 200 hit points, and the tortoise is very resilient to physical attacks.

As for fling, what I meant about it not fitting in with the soldier role, is there are no other soldiers with push powers that i can find in the MM. The soldier's role is to draw character's attacks and defend other monsters. To quote the DMG: Use soldiers in an encounter to keep the party in place.

To sum up: One power is too powerful for heroic tier, the other is not thematically appropriate for the role.
Ariana, Human Falconer, Level 8 Artillery
Medium natural humanoid; XP 350

Initiative +7; Senses Perception +12 (+14 sight based checks)
HP 69; Bloodied 34; see falcon
AC 16; Fortitude 15, Reflex 16, Will 16
Speed 6

IMAGE(http://www.ariagames.net/forums/images/smilies/branged.gif)Longbow (standard; at-will) * Weapon
+15 vs. AC; 2d6+5 damage.
Falcon Ariana shares her actions with her falcon (as a mount). On turns the falcon does not act, if it is flying, it shifts the requisite 2 squares to maintain flight. Damage dealt to the falcon is also dealt to Ariana, though damage dealt to the falcon cannot bring Ariana below 1 hp. Ariana and the falcon also share healing and healing surges.
Through the Falcon's Eyes Ariana's connection to her falcon grants her a +2 power bonus to sight based Perception checks.
Falcon's Instinct With the falcon's assistance Ariana gains a +2 power bonus to foraging checks.

Alignment Unaligned; Languages Common, Elven
Skills Nature +12, Perception +12
Str 11 (+4) Dex 17 (+7) Wis 17 (+7)
Con 15 (+6) Int 10 (+4) Cha 13 (+5)
Equipment longbow
Falcon, Level 8 Cohort
Tiny natural beast

Initiative acts with Ariana; Senses Perception +12
HP 34; Bloodied 17; all damage dealt to the falcon is also dealt to Ariana.
AC 20; Fortitude 13, Reflex 18, Will 16
Speed 2 (clumsy), fly 8

IMAGE(http://www.ariagames.net/forums/images/smilies/bmelee.gif)Claws (standard; at-will)
+9 vs. AC; 1d4+5 damage.
IMAGE(http://www.ariagames.net/forums/images/smilies/ranged.gif)Swoop (standard; recharge IMAGE(http://www.ariagames.net/forums/images/smilies/5.gif)IMAGE(http://www.ariagames.net/forums/images/smilies/6.gif))
Range 7; +15 vs. AC; 3d8+5 damage; the falcon must begin at least 2 squares away from the target and shifts up to 8 squares into any square directly across from the target after the attack.
Training ...?...

Alignment Unaligned; Languages None
Skills Endurance +9, Perception +15
Str 3 (+0) Dex 20 (+9) Wis 16 (+7)
Con 10 (+4) Int 2 (+0) Cha 13 (+5)
I still believe that the tortoise should have an ability to represent it withdrawing into the shell. I'd rather see this creature as a paragon of defensive ability rather than a run-of-the-mill soldier. I mean, other than a high constitution there is no defensive difference between your tortoise and a hobgoblin.

I don't see how sliding characters does not keep the party in place.

Soldiers with push/pull/slide/knocked-prone abilities: Yuan-ti Abomination, Warforged Captain, Umber Hulk, War Troll, Sphinx, there's more, I kinda gave up after a bit. There are more with immobilize and grab powers too. So it might not be the focus of the Soldier role, but abilities that move characters around can work with Soldiers.

How about this for a re-worked Iron Shell:

Iron Shell: Standard action: The Dire Tortoise gains 50% resistance to all damage, but it takes a -4 penalty to all attack rolls. It can sustain this stance as a minor action.
Now that I understand what you are trying to represent, what about using total defense as a framework like so?:

Iron Shell (standard; recharge when first bloodied)
The tortoise heals one-quarter of hit total hit points, becomes insubstantial, and gains a +2 bonus to all its defenses until the start of its next turn. The tortoise cannot attack while using this power.

Also, I am working on the wranglers, but I'll be away from the computer for most of this week.

Sounds good to me, but there is one thing.

As worded in the PHB "insubstantial" works perfectly for what this ability should do. However, I think it'd be a lot better to spell it out (half damage from direct, area, and ongoing attacks) simply because the word insubstantial implies ghostly-ness. I had to look it up to make sure the ability didn't let it walk through walls. So this works perfectly as we have it now, I'd just reword it to avoid confusion.

Might I introduce a family? It's a little bit out there though.


A lone dwarf woodsman moves into the forests around the town with his adopted children, three Minotaurs, a Gnoll, and two young human boys.

The dwarf only wants to rebuild the home he used to have before he and his odd group were forced to move. The curse-warped golden dragon burned much of their forest and crashed in their cave dwelling.

The dwarf has begun carving out his new home in a cave in the forest while his children cut down trees for construction. Their home was a nicely built clan structure with many halls and chambers and the dwarf is stubbornly ignoring the fact he doesn't have the skill with stonework to make such an abode.

Not that things were going well at their old home anyway. The dwarves had cut down the forest in a haphazard way, causing their logging industry to suffer for it. The dwarf is determined to look after the forest in his new home so they don't ruin it and thus doing, put themselves out of a job.


The children are a bunch of orphans and young refugees that the dwarf took in before the golden dragon attack. Now that the old dwarf himself is a refugee they are trying their hardest to support him.

The three minotaurs and the gnoll are good aligned but realize how most people view those of their race. Though physically strong they try their hardest to not cause any trouble. When in town they say little and hurry with their tasks so the can get back home. The two human boys are too young to be thinking of much more then having a good time. They all consider themselves brothers and the dwarf his father.

They all share the same dream as their adoptive father.





How's that? Just an idea >_>
dear god I killed the thread
That isn't it really. A lot of us have been extremely busy lately.

To comment on your suggestion: I first thought that it would be horrible, unfitting, and... ...too bizarre. Then I gave it a while to mull over the idea. I like it, and here's why:

4e, for better or worse, is a bit higher fantasy than many of us anticipated.
It's nice to see the thread still going. I haven't had the chance to read all of the recent posts yet though. Can someone give me a brief overview of what I've missed? Has the City Building started?
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Some discussion needs to be had about 4e as it relates to our thread. The feel of 4e is so different, that I am not sure that our low-magic/commoner refugee group is the way to go. If everyone is okay with a high magic setting, I need to have this flushed out soon, as my players are on their way to Thorast Kax as we speak.

Really, the more people who speak up, the easier this will be.
Yeah, I'm ok with a high-magic setting. The whole no-PC-classes thing is a bit more difficult in 4E, but I believe the idea of no adventurers still works.

I'm setting my campaign here too, although I'm making it 20 yrs later for various reasons.
Now that I understand what you are trying to represent, what about using total defense as a framework like so?:

Iron Shell (standard; recharge when first bloodied)
The tortoise heals one-quarter of hit total hit points, becomes insubstantial, and gains a +2 bonus to all its defenses until the start of its next turn. The tortoise cannot attack while using this power.

Also, I am working on the wranglers, but I'll be away from the computer for most of this week.


How about treating it as cover instead.

✦ Superior Cover (–5 Penalty to Attack Rolls): The
target is protected by a significant terrain advantage,
such as when fighting from behind a window, a
portcullis, a grate, or an arrow slit.

Iron Shell (Standard Action recharge when first bloodied)
The tortoise uses a healing surge and gains Superior Cover until the end of it's next turn. The tortoise cannot attack until the end of it's next turn.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

Another suggestion in keeping with the point of light idea.

The Spring Thaws.

Every year the spring thaw brings a surge in the rivers levels.

In particularly warm years this thaw brings zombies washing down the river due to the thawing of an ancient undead city that lies frozen in the highest mountain reaches.

Dragon Spawning Season

This occurs east of the city every 5th Fall. During this time trade is restricted due to the Eastern Pass being overrun by breeding Dragons.

The season lasts 3 months.

ON the first day of the following Spring the town has Green Dragon Day.

On Green Dragon Day the families go out with their children in search of the egg clutches. Green dragon eggs are a delicacy and fetch a pretty copper at market or make a very nice meal for 20.

Those eggs that are not found produce green baby green dragons.

The Hatching occurs roughly three weeks after Green Dragon Day.


Adventurers are hired to clear these little beasts. Dragon Veal is also a delicacy and brings much profit and easily offsets the cost of hiring the adventurers.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

...snip...

In short, no. You might develop that further and post it to the Points of Light (and Dark) thread which is also stickied in this forum. If you'd like to discuss the matter further, I would be more than willing to, but barring a seriously awesome argument in favor I can almost guarantee that this does not fit in with the vision of the TBACT4. (<--- Not intended to be harsh)

Speaking of the 4th TBACT, I will be working up the OP of the thread over the next week, unless anyone objects. I hope to have this thing up and running by the end of the month.

anyone that would like to contribute anything that they may have already worked on, you can PM me or post it here to the thread. Also , anyone that would like to see the completed OP before it gets posted (so that we can catch all of my mistakes early), send me a PM.

Thank you and have a nice day.
~Pk
How about treating it as cover instead.

✦ Superior Cover (–5 Penalty to Attack Rolls): The
target is protected by a significant terrain advantage,
such as when fighting from behind a window, a
portcullis, a grate, or an arrow slit.

Iron Shell (Standard Action recharge when first bloodied)
The tortoise uses a healing surge and gains Superior Cover until the end of it's next turn. The tortoise cannot attack until the end of it's next turn.

That's an awesome idea. Good call. When I get time, I'll look at working it in.
In short, no. You might develop that further and post it to the Points of Light (and Dark) thread which is also stickied in this forum. If you'd like to discuss the matter further, I would be more than willing to, but barring a seriously awesome argument in favor I can almost guarantee that this does not fit in with the vision of the TBACT4. (<--- Not intended to be harsh)

Speaking of the 4th TBACT, I will be working up the OP of the thread over the next week, unless anyone objects. I hope to have this thing up and running by the end of the month.

anyone that would like to contribute anything that they may have already worked on, you can PM me or post it here to the thread. Also , anyone that would like to see the completed OP before it gets posted (so that we can catch all of my mistakes early), send me a PM.

Thank you and have a nice day.
~Pk

No worries mate, I'm actually using this in the city I'm building for my next campaign and thought I'd throw in my 2 copper.

And I'm glad you like the Superior Cover idea, it seemed to fit with what you were looking for.

Edition wars kill players,Dungeons and Dragons needs every player it can get.

What?
The OP is well underway (over 11,000 characters so far), but I ran into a minor issue. Namely, a town charter. I think that the refugees who are most affluent and educated, not to mention charismatic, will want to establish some sort of order in the new city, assuming that that is their intention. I believe they all understand that returning to Thorast Kax is not an option, nor is settling en mass in any other cities (for whatever reasons).

So I ask you, what should be in the town charter? This will lay the foundation for the laws and official government of the city and should address things like judiciary responsibilities, a militia, taxes, ownership, land, etc. I will write as much of it myself as I have too, but the more input I get, the better it will turn out.

Also, consider the opinions of the refugees (and share your ideas) on government and also who would scribe such a document, and signatories.

For example:
Mayflower Compact
In the name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord King James, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, etc.

Having undertaken, for the Glory of God and advancement of the Christian Faith and Honour of our King and Country, a Voyage to plant the First Colony in the Northern Parts of Virginia, do by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God and one of another, Covenant and Combine ourselves together into a Civil Body Politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the Colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. In witness whereof we have hereunder subscribed our names at Cape Cod, the 11th of November, in the year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord King James, of England, France and Ireland the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty-fourth. Anno Domini 1620.
Charter for Town of St. Omer, 1127
I, William, by the grace of God, Count of Flanders, not wishing to reject the petition of the citizens of St. Omer---especially as they have willingly received my petition about the consulate of Flanders, and because they have always been honest and faithful to me---grant them the laws written below, and command that those laws remain inviolate.

1. First that to every man I will show peace, and I will protect and defend them with good will just as I do my other men. And I grant that justice be done to all of them by my bailiffs, and I wish that they do justice to me also. I grant liberty to my bailiffs such as my other bailiffs have.

2. If any citizen of St. Omer lend money to any one, and the borrower freely acknowledge this in the presence of lawful men of that town and of his heirs, if the debt be unpaid on the agreed date, he or his goods may be detained until all be paid. If he be unwilling to pay, or deny the agreement, he shall be detained until he pay the debt if he be convicted on the testimony of two bailiffs or two sworn men.

5. All those who have their gild and belong to it, and who reside within the limits of the town, I make free of toll at the port of Dixmude and at the port of Gravelines; and throughout all the land of Flanders I make them free of sewerp. I grant them the toll which the people of Arras pay at Bapaume.

6. If any of them go to the land of the Emperor for trade, he shall not be forced to lose his gild by any of my people.

7. If it should happen that at any time I should acquire land outside of Flanders, or if a treaty of peace be made between me and my uncle, Henry, King of the English, I will cause them to be made free of all toll in the land acquired, or in the whole land of England, or I will make them free of all customs by the terms of such treaty.

9. All who dwell within the walls of St. Omer, or who dwell there in the future, I make free from cavagium, i.e., from head-tax, and from suit of court.

1l. Moreover they have asked the king of France and Ralph of Peronne that wherever they go in their lands they may be free of toll, transit dues, and passage; I wish this to be granted to them.

13. As I wish the citizens of Flanders to be free henceforward from all customs, I shall require from them no scot, or taille, or forced loan.

14. The thirty pounds a year I had from St. Omer and whatever I ought to have from there, I grant for the restoration of their damaged property, and for the maintenance of their gild. The burgesses shall see to it that there is good and stable coinage during my life whereby the town may be improved.

15. Since the guards who nightly watch the castle of St. Omer have had a fee decreed from of old to be in oats, cheeses, and goatskins, and since they have been accustomed to take bread and one or two denarii from every house unjustly on the feasts of St. Omer and St. Bertin and at the Nativity, or to take guarantees from the poor for these things, we decree that they shall not dare in the future to take anything above their stipend.

16. Whoever comes to Nieuport from any place shall have permission to come to St. Omer with his goods in whatever ship he pleases.

17. If I make peace with Stephen, Count of Boulogne, I shall make them free of toll and sewerp throughout all his lands and at Wissant.

18. I grant for their use the pasture in the wood near St. Omer, which is called Lo, and the marshes, meadows, whins and fallow lands, except the land of the lepers, just as it was in the time of Count Robert the Bearded.

19. I make free from all toll the houses which are in the care of the advocate of the Abbey of St. Bertin, namely, those which are inhabited. Each gives twelve denarii at the feast of St. Michael, twelve denarii as brotban, and twelve denarii as byrban. Those which are empty pay nothing.

25. The following have promised that this agreement shall be observed by all, and they have sealed their promise with an oath: Louis, King of the French; William, Count of Flanders; Ralph of Peronne, etc.
The Farmer's Law, 7-8th Centuries
The Farmer who is working his own field must be just and must not encroach on his neighbor's furrows. If a farmer persists in encroaching and dock's a neighboring lot - if he did this in plowing time, he loses his plowing; if it was in sowing time that he made his encroachment, he loses his seed and his husbandry and his crop - the farmer who encroached.

If a farmer without his landowner's cognizance enters and plows or sows let him not receive either wages for his plowing or the crop for his sowing - no, not even the seed that has been cast.

If two farmers agree with the other before two or three witnesses to exchange lands and they agree for all time, let their determination and their exchange remain firm and secure and unassailable.

If two farmers, A and B, agree to exchange their lands for the season of sowing and A draws back, then, if the seed was cast, they may not draw back; but if the seed was not cast they may draw back; but if A did not plow while B did, A also shall plow.

If two farmers exchange lands either for a season or for all time and one plot is found deficient as compared with the other, and this was not their agreement, let him who has more give an equivalent in land to him who has less; but if this was their agreement, let them give nothing in addition.

If a farmer who has a claim on a field enters against the sower's will and reaps, then, if he had a just claim, let him take nothing from it; but if his claim was baseless, let him provide twice over the crops that were reaped.

If two territories contend about a boundary or a field, let the judges consider it and they shall decide in favor of the territory which had thee longer possession; but if there is an ancient landmark, let the ancient determination remain unassailed.

If a division wronged people in their lots or lands, let them have license to undo the division.

If a farmer on shares reaps without the grantor's consent and robs him of his sheaves, as a thief shall he be deprived of all his crop.

A share holder's portion is nine bundles, the grantor's one: he who divides outside these limits is accursed.

If a man takes land from an Indigent farmer and agrees to plow only and to divide, let their agreement prevail; if they also agreed on sowing, let it prevail according to their agreement.

If a farmer takes from some indigent farmer, his vineyard to work on a half share and does not prune it as is filling and dig it and fence it and dig it over, let him receive nothing from the produce....

If a farmer takes over the farming of a vineyard or piece of land and agrees with the owner and takes earnest-money and starts and then draws back and gives it up, let him give the just value of the field and let the owner have the field.

If a farmer enters and works another farmer's woodland, for three years he shall take its profits for himself and then give the land back again to its owner.

If a farmer who is too poor to work his own vineyard takes flight and goes abroad, let those from whom claims are made by the public treasury gather in the grapes, and the farmer if he returns shall not be entitled to mulct them In the wine.

If a farmer who runs away from his own field pays every year the extraordinary taxes of the public treasury, let those who gather in the grapes and occupy the field be mulcted twofold.

Concerning Herdsmen. If a neat herd in the morning receives an ox front a farmer and mixes it with the herd, and it happens that the ox is destroyed by a wolf, let him explain the accident to its master and he himself shall go harmless.

If a herdsman who has received an ox loses it and on the same clay on which the ox was lost does not give notice to the master of the ox that "I kept sight of the ox up to this or that point, but what is become of it I do not know," let him not go harmless, but, if he gave notice, let him go harmless.

If a herdsman receives an ox from a farmer in the morning and goes off and the ox gets separated front the mass of oxen and goes off and goes into cultivated plots or vineyards and does harm, let him not lose his wages, but let him make good the harm done.

If a herdsman in the morning receives all ox from a farmer arid the ox disappears, let him swear in the Lord's name that he has not himself played foul and at he had no part in the loss of the ox and let him go harmless.

If a guardian of fruit is found stealing in the place which he guards, let him lose his wages and be well beaten.

If a hired shepherd is found milking his flock without the owner's knowledge and selling them, let him be beaten and lose his wages.

If a man is found stealing another's straw, he shall restore it twice over.

If a man takes an ox or an ass or any beast without its owner's knowledge and goes off on business, let him give its hire twice over; and if it dies on the road, he shall give two for one, whatever it may be....

If a man steals all ox or an ass and is convicted, he shall be whipped and give it twice over and all its gain.

If while a mail is trying to steal one ox from a herd, the herd is put to flight and eaten by wild beasts, let him be blinded.

If a man finds an ox in a wood and kills it, and takes the carcass let his hand be cut off.

If a slave kills one ox or ass or ram in a wood, his master shall make it good

If a slave, while trying to steal by night, drives the sheep away from the flock in chasing them out of the fold, and they are lost or eaten by wild beasts, let him be hanged as a murderer.

If a man is found in a granary stealing corn, let him receive in the first place a hundred lashes, and make good the damage to the owner; if he is convicted a second time, let him pay twofold damages for his theft; if a third time, let him be blinded.

If a man at night steals wine front a jar or from a vat or out of a butt, let him suffer the same penalty as is written in the chapter above.

If people have a deficient measure of corn and wine arid do not follow the ancient tradition of their fathers but out of covetousness have unjust measures contrary to those that are appointed, let them be beaten for their impiety.

If a man delivers cattle to a slave for pasture without his master's knowledge and the slave sells them or otherwise damages them, let the slave and his master go harmless. Where a man destroys another's beast on any pretense, when he is recognized, let him indemnify its owner.

If a man harvests his lot. before his neighbor's lots have been harvested and he brings in his beasts and does harm to his neighbors, let him receive thirty lashes and make good the damage to the party injured.

If a man gathers in the fruits of his vineyard arid while the fruits of some lots are still ungathered brings in his beasts, let him receive thirty lashes and make good the damage to the party injured.

If a man lawlessly, when he has a suit with another, cuts his vines or any other tree, let his hand be cut off.

If a man who is dwelling in a district ascertains that a piece of common ground is suitable for the erection of a mill and appropriates it and then, after the completion of the building, if the commonalty of the district complain of the owner of the building as having appropriated common ground, let them give him all the expenditure that's due to him for the completion of the building and let them share it in common with its builder.

If after the land of the district has been divided, a man finds in his own lot a place which is suitable for the erection of a mill and sets about it, the farmers of the other lots are not entitled to say anything about the mill.

If the water which comes to the mill leaves dry cultivated plots or vineyards, let him make the damage good; if not, let the mill be idle.

If the owners of the cultivated plots are not willing that the water go through their plots, let them be entitled to prevent it.
Adopted from Thukad's idea for a family (sans lumberjacking), I present to you...
Residents of the Dragonbane Redoubt

IMAGE(http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff313/perennialrook/AnhurHathorHoruscopy.jpg)
From left to right: Levi & Eli (human children), Hathor, Anhur Fletchaft,
Horus, Sekani (gnoll pup), Aloli (minotaur calf), and an unnamed sprite.



The dwarves are making long expeditions to find ancient dwarven ruins and reclaim them as they start to renew their former glory. The Dragonbane Redoubt was one such discovery, cataloged by Bofbin himself, though ultimately considered not worth the trouble of the dwarven host and all but forgotten for a decade or so.

Enter Anhur Fletchaft, an old, battle-hardened, dwarven bolter in an advanced dwarven mercenary unit that is sent to the redoubt, though for reasons that Anhur himself can only guess. The newest residents of the redoubt, a small herd of minotaurs who liked the place for its winding natural caverns, seemed none too thrilled to be ousted from their home and a bloody siege ensued. The minotaurs savagely defended but ultimately fell, though not before decimating the dwarven unit down to the last soldier.

Anhur, now completely alone, his own shots having felled the mighty savage minotaur guardian of the tribe, hears a faint lowing. Entering the cloister, he turned to the north tower from which the sound emanated. The action on his repeating crossbow was as smooth as ever as he loaded another bolt for the surviving offender.

Of all the things he could have expected as he entered the ruins of the north watchtower, two wobbly calves cradled in the still arms of a slumped heifer was not one of them. He considered for a moment ending them, and had they been goblins he would not have hesitated, but they were so young, each with a pair of glistening doe-eyes.

There were no options. Anhur did not have hubris enough to make the journey to his homelands alone, let alone with two minotaur calves in tow. Anhur stayed.

One calf, the female, creamy brown with big, doe eyes, he gave the name Hathor, an old clan word for the portion of the night sky so thick with stars it looked like cascading milk. He named the other calf, the jet black male, Horus, an old clan name for the golden sun as it sets before the night the sky.

* * *



The two calves grew quickly into full grown 'taurs. Horus, feeling the call of his warrior blood, begged Anhur, whom he considered his own father, to teach him and instruct him in the ways of war. What Horus did not know, was that he had been taught all along in his daily tasks and legends of the Fletchaft Clan.

Hauling buckets at each end of a makeshift yoke up the long switchbacks leading to the redoubt had prepared Horus to heft the mighty dire flail that his progenitors had left to his inheritance. Stories of the struggles of the dwarven race cemented the values of honor and tenacity, which carried over well to combat. A game of colored stones that the 'taur had played from early in his youth was a tactics lesson in disguise. All that was left was for Horus to master his weapon, something he would have to do on his own, as Anhur had no experience with chained weapons.

In the forest, as the dwarf hunted and fell wood, Horus smashed and swirled about with his newfound joy, the large dire flail, leaving his crushing mark indented in the bark of the trees.

Hathor seemed inspired to another path, adopting the heifer maiden garb that Anhur had gifted out to her over the years. Trinkets, small bells, exotic scarves, and most recently a harp. It was out of tune, and Anhur was most apologetic for not knowing how to play or fix the instrument, but it was the last gift he had saved from the fateful day he had decided to stay in this place.

* * *



Anhur realized that the two 'taurs were old enough and experienced enough now to travel safely, and with Thorast Kax not so far distant, he began to ponder returning to civilization. What would civilization think of his adopted children? He could live in a dwarven burrow, but what of them? They had never known jeers or hatred.

While Anhur pondered, Hathor was taking to the harp like a fish to water. It seemed a natural part of her, and combined with her low, ghostly lowing, she could pluck wonderful tunes that none of the unlikely trio had never heard. It was this lowing that caused Horus to see Hathor in a new light.

Not long after, Hathor began to swell with child, and after a long cold winter, bitter as any they had known, a new calf was born to the young parents. Hathor named the young 'taur Aloli, after the clan name for the wild grapes that grew in the valley below.

The time of bliss was short lived, as the birth of the child had called to the senses of a small wandering gnoll tribe. The battle was short and bloody, but superior dwarven tactics, a few well placed traps, and a well placed portcullis prevailed. When they had turned the tide of battle, Horus pressed the advantage, lost to the cunning of instinct, decimating the rest of the tribe as it scrambled down the switchbacks. Anhur would have followed, but felt compelled to remain with Hathor and his new grandchild, though he would scold Horus like he hadn't since the young bull was still a calf.

It was night when Horus returned, approaching the large fire with his fur wet with blood and tears. Over one shoulder was slung the shaft of his dire flail, and in his other hand, a young gnoll cub.

"I...," started Horus, his low voice cracking.

"I know," said Anhur, "you couldn't."

They named the small cub Sekani, for the haunting laughter of the hyena. With Hathor giving milk, raising the cub was little problem logistically, though it did seal the fate of Anhur's dreams of returning to civilization. But Anhur's concerns ran deeper.

Months passed. The cub and calf were playing like brothers, toddling about together, wrestling, fighting. Anhur watched in amazement as two blood enemies became as one blood.

* * *



It was a late autumn day when Anhur began to suspect a rat. Their provisions, which they had been collecting for oncoming winter seemed to be disappearing. One day there were a few less mushrooms, the next day some wild onion root had been nibbled at, and later that week Anhur could not find a clay pot he had been attempting to ferment some of the grapes in (though admittedly he had no idea what he was doing).

Anhur, now well versed in snares, a trick he had taught himself in the long solitude of parenthood, prepared a small snare in the room, though small enough not to hurt either the cub or the calf, were they the clever culprits.

It was not a day before he heard the howling in the tunnel. In more than a few quick strides he was in the root cellar staring down the thief. The dirty, bloody face of a small boy lay on the floor of the room, one of its feet was strung up high in the air, and a small collection of carrots lay scattered about.

The small child grew suddenly still and quiet as Anhur entered the room. As he approached the young lad, he drew his skinning knife from his belt, though before he could reach the rope he was suddenly pelted with small fists. It seemed that another boy, even smaller than the first, had hidden itself when the trap first sprung.

Anhur easily pulled the child from him, holding it by the scruff of its neck, though not much of a handhold on such a scrawny thing as this was. The two boys were in rags, starved to the bone, and shivering with the fear of death.

"Who are you?" asked the old, gruff dwarf.

The two boys, one not yet twelve and the other barely nine, just stared right back, each one ghost white except for the filth and dirt that covered them. It was then that Hathor burst into the room, a large pestle raised in her hand. When she saw the intruders, she rushed to them.

"Let him down at once," she demanded, snatching the smaller one to her bosom.

Anhur's family had grown again.
Adopted from Thukad's idea for a family (sans lumberjacking), I present to you...
Residents of the Dragonbane Redoubt

IMAGE(http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff313/perennialrook/AnhurHathorHoruscopy.jpg)
From left to right: Levi & Eli (human children), Hathor, Anhur Fletchaft,
Horus, Sekani (gnoll pup), Aloli (minotaur calf), and an unnamed sprite.



The dwarves are making long expeditions to find ancient dwarven ruins and reclaim them as they start to renew their former glory. The Dragonbane Redoubt was one such discovery, cataloged by Bofbin himself, though ultimately considered not worth the trouble of the dwarven host and all but forgotten for a decade or so.

Enter Anhur Fletchaft, an old, battle-hardened, dwarven bolter in an advanced dwarven mercenary unit that is sent to the redoubt, though for reasons that Anhur himself can only guess. The newest residents of the redoubt, a small herd of minotaurs who liked the place for its winding natural caverns, seemed none too thrilled to be ousted from their home and a bloody siege ensued. The minotaurs savagely defended but ultimately fell, though not before decimating the dwarven unit down to the last soldier.

Anhur, now completely alone, his own shots having felled the mighty savage minotaur guardian of the tribe, hears a faint lowing. Entering the cloister, he turned to the north tower from which the sound emanated. The action on his repeating crossbow was as smooth as ever as he loaded another bolt for the surviving offender.

Of all the things he could have expected as he entered the ruins of the north watchtower, two wobbly calves cradled in the still arms of a slumped heifer was not one of them. He considered for a moment ending them, and had they been goblins he would not have hesitated, but they were so young, each with a pair of glistening doe-eyes.

There were no options. Anhur did not have hubris enough to make the journey to his homelands alone, let alone with two minotaur calves in tow. Anhur stayed.

One calf, the female, creamy brown with big, doe eyes, he gave the name Hathor, an old clan word for the portion of the night sky so thick with stars it looked like cascading milk. He named the other calf, the jet black male, Horus, an old clan name for the golden sun as it sets before the night the sky.

* * *



The two calves grew quickly into full grown 'taurs. Horus, feeling the call of his warrior blood, begged Anhur, whom he considered his own father, to teach him and instruct him in the ways of war. What Horus did not know, was that he had been taught all along in his daily tasks and legends of the Fletchaft Clan.

Hauling buckets at each end of a makeshift yoke up the long switchbacks leading to the redoubt had prepared Horus to heft the mighty dire flail that his progenitors had left to his inheritance. Stories of the struggles of the dwarven race cemented the values of honor and tenacity, which carried over well to combat. A game of colored stones that the 'taur had played from early in his youth was a tactics lesson in disguise. All that was left was for Horus to master his weapon, something he would have to do on his own, as Anhur had no experience with chained weapons.

In the forest, as the dwarf hunted and fell wood, Horus smashed and swirled about with his newfound joy, the large dire flail, leaving his crushing mark indented in the bark of the trees.

Hathor seemed inspired to another path, adopting the heifer maiden garb that Anhur had gifted out to her over the years. Trinkets, small bells, exotic scarves, and most recently a harp. It was out of tune, and Anhur was most apologetic for not knowing how to play or fix the instrument, but it was the last gift he had saved from the fateful day he had decided to stay in this place.

* * *



Anhur realized that the two 'taurs were old enough and experienced enough now to travel safely, and with Thorast Kax not so far distant, he began to ponder returning to civilization. What would civilization think of his adopted children? He could live in a dwarven burrow, but what of them? They had never known jeers or hatred.

While Anhur pondered, Hathor was taking to the harp like a fish to water. It seemed a natural part of her, and combined with her low, ghostly lowing, she could pluck wonderful tunes that none of the unlikely trio had never heard. It was this lowing that caused Horus to see Hathor in a new light.

Not long after, Hathor began to swell with child, and after a long cold winter, bitter as any they had known, a new calf was born to the young parents. Hathor named the young 'taur Aloli, after the clan name for the wild grapes that grew in the valley below.

The time of bliss was short lived, as the birth of the child had called to the senses of a small wandering gnoll tribe. The battle was short and bloody, but superior dwarven tactics, a few well placed traps, and a well placed portcullis prevailed. When they had turned the tide of battle, Horus pressed the advantage, lost to the cunning of instinct, decimating the rest of the tribe as it scrambled down the switchbacks. Anhur would have followed, but felt compelled to remain with Hathor and his new grandchild, though he would scold Horus like he hadn't since the young bull was still a calf.

It was night when Horus returned, approaching the large fire with his fur wet with blood and tears. Over one shoulder was slung the shaft of his dire flail, and in his other hand, a young gnoll cub.

"I...," started Horus, his low voice cracking.

"I know," said Anhur, "you couldn't."

They named the small cub Sekani, for the haunting laughter of the hyena. With Hathor giving milk, raising the cub was little problem logistically, though it did seal the fate of Anhur's dreams of returning to civilization. But Anhur's concerns ran deeper.

Months passed. The cub and calf were playing like brothers, toddling about together, wrestling, fighting. Anhur watched in amazement as two blood enemies became as one blood.

* * *



It was a late autumn day when Anhur began to suspect a rat. Their provisions, which they had been collecting for oncoming winter seemed to be disappearing. One day there were a few less mushrooms, the next day some wild onion root had been nibbled at, and later that week Anhur could not find a clay pot he had been attempting to ferment some of the grapes in (though admittedly he had no idea what he was doing).

Anhur, now well versed in snares, a trick he had taught himself in the long solitude of parenthood, prepared a small snare in the room, though small enough not to hurt either the cub or the calf, were they the clever culprits.

It was not a day before he heard the howling in the tunnel. In more than a few quick strides he was in the root cellar staring down the thief. The dirty, bloody face of a small boy lay on the floor of the room, one of its feet was strung up high in the air, and a small collection of carrots lay scattered about.

The small child grew suddenly still and quiet as Anhur entered the room. As he approached the young lad, he drew his skinning knife from his belt, though before he could reach the rope he was suddenly pelted with small fists. It seemed that another boy, even smaller than the first, had hidden itself when the trap first sprung.

Anhur easily pulled the child from him, holding it by the scruff of its neck, though not much of a handhold on such a scrawny thing as this was. The two boys were in rags, starved to the bone, and shivering with the fear of death.

"Who are you?" asked the old, gruff dwarf.

The two boys, one not yet twelve and the other barely nine, just stared right back, each one ghost white except for the filth and dirt that covered them. It was then that Hathor burst into the room, a large pestle raised in her hand. When she saw the intruders, she rushed to them.

"Let him down at once," she demanded, snatching the smaller one to her bosom.

Anhur's family had grown again.

Are we making these the current inhabitants of the redoubt? I, for one, like the background and how it meshes with the story. The built in conflict could prove interesting too. I'll make my vote yes. But, I think that should do it for people for the time being.
It's nice to see the thread still going. I haven't had the chance to read all of the recent posts yet though. Can someone give me a brief overview of what I've missed? Has the City Building started?

No, at present the Build A City 4.0 project is still in its discussion phase. Nothing yet has been put to story and there are still a few more things that we're trying to decide on.

Unfortunately, the discussion has been interrupted by the release of the edition we are trying to highlight. This edition seems so fundamentally different, there is now some confusion has to how we wish to implement the new rules into the story.

First of all, the very fine line between "PC"-npcs and "NPC"-npcs has now blurred. The stat blocks look almost identical, and with a few tweaks, it is now possible to create npcs from practically everything.

Secondly, the new edition has made itself available to a wide range of genre-gaming; you can create a campaign using any genre (from high-fantasy to steam-punk to film-noir and so on) and can switch genres at the drop of a hat (heck you could probably create a Rifts-like setting without any problems.)

What this means to us is that we may need to redefine our intent with the current setting. What sorts of things do we include in the on-going story (i.e. how much fantasy)? What sort of theme do we wish to use? How much emphasis do we place on PCs and PC-classes?

There are of course going to be other questions, but the one on my mind right now is: Do we proceed with Terrapin Falls and Thorast Kax, or do we start from scratch and recreate the concept?

My opinion
Being a man who does not like being inconsistent, I am reluctant to usurp all that we have decided upon already. And the rules haven’t deviated from our expectations enough to have an impact on our discussion already. However, the new rules will allow us to reconsider some ideas we’ve dismissed before (such as the Well of Worlds idea.)
...snip...
No, at present the Build A City 4.0 project is still in its discussion phase. Nothing yet has been put to story and there are still a few more things that we're trying to decide on.

Unfortunately, the discussion has been interrupted by the release of the edition we are trying to highlight. This edition seems so fundamentally different, there is now some confusion has to how we wish to implement the new rules into the story.

First of all, the very fine line between "PC"-npcs and "NPC"-npcs has now blurred. The stat blocks look almost identical, and with a few tweaks, it is now possible to create npcs from practically everything.

Secondly, the new edition has made itself available to a wide range of genre-gaming; you can create a campaign using any genre (from high-fantasy to steam-punk to film-noir and so on) and can switch genres at the drop of a hat (heck you could probably create a Rifts-like setting without any problems.)

What this means to us is that we may need to redefine our intent with the current setting. What sorts of things do we include in the on-going story (i.e. how much fantasy)? What sort of theme do we wish to use? How much emphasis do we place on PCs and PC-classes?

There are of course going to be other questions, but the one on my mind right now is: Do we proceed with Terrapin Falls and Thorast Kax, or do we start from scratch and recreate the concept?

My opinion
Being a man who does not like being inconsistent, I am reluctant to usurp all that we have decided upon already. And the rules haven’t deviated from our expectations enough to have an impact on our discussion already. However, the new rules will allow us to reconsider some ideas we’ve dismissed before (such as the Well of Worlds idea.)

I thought we were continuing as planned. In fact I have a good portion of the OP already written. As far as level of fantasy, I think that what we have is about right. We have representation of all the core races, some unique monsters, a good location, strong drive/motivation for the characters, some monstrous villains.

So really, I think that we are ready to move on to the next phase... TBACT4 main thread!
The only thing I really don't like so far is the familiarity with the monstrous races. I think 4E is much more of an "Us versus Them" game.

Also, you mention monstrous villains. Maybe I missed something (if I did I'd appreciate a reminder) but other than the dragons, which haven't really been fleshed out, I don't remember any real villians. Merriweather is kind of an idiot, but he's not a villian. Also the inhabitants of the redoubt are basically good, so that rules them out. There's still the possibility of social problems developing between people, but that is really up in the air when it comes to this kind of thing.

I don't know, I'd like to see the setting a little darker than it is now. I want to see the log which says that two hundred people set out from Kast, but less than a hundred made it here. I want to see the frustration at their first failed attempts, I want to see the constant fear, I want to see desperate people fighting for survival. In short, they're refugees. I want to see these people suffer.
...snip...
The only thing I really don't like so far is the familiarity with the monstrous races. I think 4E is much more of an "Us versus Them" game.

Also, you mention monstrous villains. Maybe I missed something (if I did I'd appreciate a reminder) but other than the dragons, which haven't really been fleshed out, I don't remember any real villians. Merriweather is kind of an idiot, but he's not a villian. Also the inhabitants of the redoubt are basically good, so that rules them out. There's still the possibility of social problems developing between people, but that is really up in the air when it comes to this kind of thing.

I don't know, I'd like to see the setting a little darker than it is now. I want to see the log which says that two hundred people set out from Kast, but less than a hundred made it here. I want to see the frustration at their first failed attempts, I want to see the constant fear, I want to see desperate people fighting for survival. In short, they're refugees. I want to see these people suffer.

Yes, the green and gold (ohh, my old high school colors!) dragons are a couple of the villains, there is the invading force that arrives shortly after the refugees leave (IIRC) and the gnoll (?) servitors of the green dragon, and we have mentioned plenty of non-villainous monsters like the snapping tortoises, wolves, etc.

As for the "thinning of the herds," you make an excellent point, and I will be modifying the OP appropriately.
Forgot about the army that actually invaded the city. Thank you for pointing that out.
Nan Kya's Orphans (WIP)

IMAGE(http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff313/perennialrook/NanKyasOrphansWIP.jpg)
From left to right: Rat, Nan Kya, Klein "Urchin" Bandon (top), Jessie, Tam, and Silaqui (eladrin orphan).

Helthal Family (WIP)

IMAGE(http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff313/perennialrook/HelthalFamilyWIPcopy.jpg)
From left to right: son, Helthal Axebreaker, wife, daughter (bottom).

Well, my group is well on its way to setting the gold dragon free in Thorast Kax.
Proposal:
Tomas Renfield
level 7 Human Wizard.(Uh, with 11,000 characters, is 1 level 7 character o.k?)
Tomas Renfield

Tomas Renfield is an aspiring wizard who hopes to become a level 13 Paragon wizard someday.(In real life terms. Like, he wants to gain the power to cast spells a level 13 wizard would.) He is a young man who is good at giving a good show.(Prestidigitation) He seems to have forgotten everything about his life up to age ten. Other than that, he is a very quick witted fellow, who hopes to combine genuine magic with entertaining tomfoolery in order to make a living. A small city like this one should help him get on his feet.
is the thread dead
It has been for awhile.

I've been using Thorast Kax in my campaign, but the community effort has born little fruit.

I would be willing to give it a go, including a detailed account of the happenings at Thorast Kax with the curse warped dragon and the surviving inhabitants.
quick question did they bring any weapons with them
quick question did they bring any weapons with them

Did who bring any weapons with them?
Bofbin Axebreaker had a great deal on his mind. Foremost on his mind was financing the trek south, which was becoming problematic with the sharp rise of prices withing the destoryed city of Thorast Kax. He, along with most of the dwarven community of the burning city owed their lives to an impetuous, young, dwarven cleric of Thane named Baloril.

Bofbin approached Baloril, who was working his frustrations out on his anvil.

"I never really thanked you, for my family, and for our community," said Bofbin, an old dwarven patriarch.

"I had to do something. I had to help," said Baloril.

"I can't help but notice that you seem troubled, however. And I can assure you that this anvil has done you no ill will," said Bofbin, trying to lighten the mood. Bofbin placed a hand on Baloril's hammer arm.

"I am scraping off the slag. I have forged a symbol of Thane for Costran, the good farmer who has become a true beacon of the people," answered Baloril. "Where would we be without him?"

Baloril had trouble lifting his head to meet Bofbin's gaze.

"I feel empty."

"It is disheartening to hear this, for all the good you have wrought. Joy should be your companion," Bofbin said, consolingly. "Tell me, what troubles you child? Surely not the fate of the city. It wasn't anything you could prevent, and your compassion is far from empty."

Baloril lay his hammer down.

"My comrades and I enjoined in righteous battle, and met evil face to face like I have not done in a while. It was good and I used His word to lift my fellows and lay the fear of Thane across the hearts of the worst creatures. Even in the face death, the demonic wretches would unleash all of their hatred...," he paused as he visualized the battle fresh.

Seeing that this was going to be no casual conversation, Bofbin asked the young dwarf, "rest from your labors and talk with me over drink, this sounds a good tale for heavy stout."

"I will drink with you..."

Bofbin led to one of the prepared wagons, lifted a couple of stools, and tapped some stout for each of them in the mugs from the Dragon's Berth tavern.

"Demonic, you say," prompted Bofbin, once they were both seated.

Baloril took a revitalizing drought before he began again.

"Gnolls of this region. Surely the force of chaos that brought the dragon of Thorast Kax to bear. They have risen to the occasion."

"Yes, I fear for our travels," Bofbin interjected.

"As we all should. And the cirumstance that have brought us... brought me... to this loss of faith..."

Bofbin looked surprised at this revelation.

Baloril continued, "we set out to find the teifling, the confounding devil woman who has thwarted our peace. The others felt... felt... well that she was needed and that she had more to play in their quests for right."

Baloril took another long draft, collecting his thoughts.

"I found word of her whereabouts and felt it was best to aid them," Baloril explained. "The young noble there... the ranger," he said, pointing to Arianna across the way near another group. "She had seen the tiefling taken by gnolls."

Rather than let the young dwarf wallow, Bofbin tried to drive him to the point.

"So what then brought about this loss of faith? Was the battle not won? You survived at least, and I have heard news in passing of your companions."

"Well... we tracked the gnolls and entered into glorious tussle with them. It was uplifting to see our warriors fall and rise with His word. And when all of the vile things had fallen or apparently left in fear, one remained. It threatened young ones it had taken with death, and when it unleashed its wretched fanged fury at them.... it turned to and seemed to beg for mercy... as if it would know what that was.

"I felled it with the might and pleasure of His word in my heart. And when the creature lay unmoving, it was then that Thane left me... when I should have felt his hand the most."

"You seem surprised that such a beast could bargain for its life," queried Bofbin, looking down to the dirt.

"His presence has disappeared completely...what does a demon know of death and loss?" Baloril finally has the strength to look Bofbin in the eyes.

Bofbin looked up to meet his gaze.

"You are zealous, child. Your markings done in the old way. You weild a power greater than you now comprehend. In your haste to deal revenge, you forgot mercy, and indeed justice. I do not envy you that choice. And I cannot pretend to know how a gnoll understands what it is to surrender."

Baloril looks on intently, the words striking a chord in him.

"Yours is a more difficult road than most dwarves will ever know," finished Bofbin.

"I failed... I failed to know Thane. I failed to aid the young ones."

"The gnoll is dispatched, and in that you have not failed."

"Handing out death was my only option," sulked the young dwarf.

Bofbin spoke sternly, "you speak then, like the gnoll, without consideration for mercy. It is this adherence to mercy, to law and good, that separates us from them."

Baloril looked away, pained.

"And if this is the lesson Thane teaches you, take it to heart. Outwit your quarry, judge with reason and conviction, but do not lose yourself fully to the fury which wells within you. It can be a source of power and conviction, but unchecked, and outside the bounds of Thane's tenants, it may lead you down a dark path."

"How will I know? How can I spread the terror of Thane to the hearts of his enemies?"

"Give no opprtunity for surrender, judge quickly, but with a full knowledge, and never let them make a fool or a mockery of Thane.

"This trial seems a test of your faith, not a lack of it. And it is good that you seek council, though I will not always know the answers. It is in your connection to Thane and His teachings that you will know."

Baloril shook his head, slightly side to side.

"I... I cannot know... how can I learn to be judge over such infernal things? My hammer is my law. How will it know right?"

"You have the knowledge and the facilities to judge. If not, I would not be seated here now. Your mind and soul are more than a match for your hammer. Trust not only in the strength of your arm, but in the strength of your will, the strength of your conviction, and the strength of Thane. Know that He cannot lead astray."

Baloril lifted Thane's Dread, the name of his hammer.

"I cannot... I can't let this law bear justice without the truth. But can I... or you... ever fully know it?"

"Though the things you fight are creatures of lies and deceit, when you feel lost, trust in your connection to Thane and his divine guidance. Turn to him, and you will know."

"For the first time in my life, I actually fear my own weapon."

"You should fear it. It controls your destiny. Drive that fear outwards, or it will consume you. Make your enemies feel that fear."

"Who am I to wield it? I cannot be the harbinger of it's doom again. I must relent. Can my battle ever bear good again?"

"With good judgement, and the conviction to act, you will become a beacon of good."

Baloril looked at Bofbin, a little more hopefully.

"You are saying... the hammer MUST swing."

"You are the hammer. You fear the power inside yourself. The hammer is an extension of your very being. Your actions will shape the world around you, better to shape them as you know how, with a hammer and anvil."

Baloril's eyes widened, and he drug a long draught to the bottom of this mug.

"You then ask, what is your anvil? It is your companions. And as you removed the slag from your anvil, so must you help your companions. They need you, lest they fall."

"You are saying.. I must fight... and guide them. Lighten and purify their way."

"I leave that to your wisdom. I have offered what advise I can, but I do not pretend to hold so much sway over the cleric of Thane. But it seems you know your path."

"The path would not be seen without your clarity. How can I repay you for your sage words?"

"Bless our new endevors, and continue to be a force for good in this land. That is all I can ask."

Bofbin finished off his mug, then looked out over the plains below.

"I may never fully know Thane's will. Perhaps it is the craftwork I will pursue all my life," said Baloril, his path now clear.
Awesome story!!!
Is this something in your current campagn or something added to the BATC4?
Either way, cant wait to read more of it. :D
Perhaps this should have been offered up at some point.

Towns That Were Planned
The most famous and striking planned towns in ancient times were built between 3,000 and 2,000 years ago in the district surrounding the eastern Mediterranean, by the Cretans, Greeks and Macedonians. Alexander the Great (who lived from 356 to 323 B.C.) founded many new cities in countries he conquered, and filled them with his soldiers and ex-soldiers. Later on the Romans did the same in western Europe and England. These cities were usually on new sites, and could be completely planned in advance, because the powerful rulers who ordered them could take the land that was needed by force and did not have to bother about the wishes of the people sent to live in them.
The plans of many of these ancient cities can still be traced in ruins that have been dug out, and here and there in cities that still exist. They are usually simple plans, with two straight roads crossing at right angles in the middle, narrower roads at regular distances, big squares for markets and public buildings and for drilling troops, and walls for defence against attackers. The houses are mostly massed together between the narrow roads, without gardens, for in those days the ordinary citizen did not have much say about where he was to live. However, the main purpose of the cities was to be military strongholds, and for this the plans were good. Often the grouping and design of the public buildings was noble and beautiful.
These ancient plans had a big influence on the building of cities. Their main ideas were copied, for instance, in the many new towns built in France, England and Wales, for similar military reasons, in the time of Edward I (1239-1307). Among them were Conway, Caernarvon, Winchelsea and Kingston-upon-Hull. At Chester the main Roman streets crossing at the centre (The Cross), and the city walls can still be seen. At Winchelsea the original plan of che time of Edward I is still almost intact, because the town never grew.
Some of the ideas in the old plans were carried over into towns and parts of towns built by rulers or great landowners in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Other interesting designs, however, came into use as well, such as the "radial" plan —like the spokes of a wheel or a spider's web— to be seen in Karlsruhe (Germany), Washington (United States) and Middlesbrough (England). There are many books that show how ideas of lay-out spread from one place to another through the centuries.

Towns That Just Grew
Planned lay-out, however, has been the exception and not the rule in the world's thousands of towns. In the newer countries there were sometimes plans of straight streets crossing each other at right angles, but otherwise the use of land and placing of buildings was not planned at all. Most towns just grew anyhow. The rea¬son is simple. Agriculture came before cities, and all through history land has mostly been owned in small pieces by many owners, each of whom originally farmed his own piece. When trades and handicrafts and manufacture began, and more and more people moved into large villages which grew into towns, each man built his house or shop or workshop to suit himself or his work, on the piece of land he owned or could buy from another person.
To begin with, there was very little to stop a man either from putting his building where he wanted, or from using it or enlarging it as he chose. Perhaps the earliest limit on what people could do with their houses came when states or cities stopped them building right into the streets by which they and others were supposed to be able to reach their houses. However, even that was not at first strictly enforced, and as more and more people went to live in towns, the buildings got bigger and more crowded. When a man had enlarged his building to cover his whole plot, and was stopped from building into the public road, he built up higher, and sometimes extended his upper storeys over the road. In York there is a street called the Shambles, from the top windows of which people cart shake hands across the street.
In many old towns buildings became so close together and so high that they cut off each other's light. Overcrowding, dark rooms, and lack of fresh air and drains caused terrible plagues. Fires spread and destroyed vast numbers of houses. Gradually the authorities had to make laws to limit the height of buildings, to insist on enough light and air between them, to make them fireproof, and to secure wider roads for increasing traffic. But towns went on growing to such an extent that these laws could not keep them healthy or convenient. People changed the use of their buildings: houses became shops, workshops and factories, and gardens were built over. Back-to-back houses that did not even have yards, were built in large numbers in some towns. So towns which had been open, healthy and pleasant when small, became crowded, dirty, dangerous, unsatisfactory muddles as they grew bigger.
After a time, as these changes took place, even the few cities which had been well planned to begin with became inconvenient and confused. Because of gradual rebuilding and other changes the original plan disappeared or became out-of-date. Today, for instance, in towns where the old planned streets still remain, traffic has increased so much that they are now far too narrow. Now and then a city used to try to improve things by widening streets or pulling down the worst slums, but until the 20th century there was no regular means of preventing such problems from arising. The growth and changes produced new problems faster than such clearances could put them right.
The Citadel Megadungeon: http://yellowdingosappendix.blogspot.com.au/2012/08/the-citadel-mega-dungeon-now-with-room.html
Did who bring any weapons with them?

The Refugies who are going to start the new city
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