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Well I got a very unsatisfying answer, but hopefully it means an errata soon.

I asked
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The new Dragon_364 class acts article on illusions has several examples of spells that do psychic damage, but do not have the psychic keyword.

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/drfe/20080616

The players handbook has no examples of of powers that deal damage of a type that is not also a keyword for that power, and reading page 55 could suggest that a power that deal a particular type of damage must have that keyword.

To further complicate things apparently different custserv reps have given different answers on this subject that have been posted on the boards (copied below).

Does "Illusory Ambush" from the dragon article have the psychic keyword even though it isn't listed?

Does the "Psychic Lock" (PHB pg 205) work with "Illusory Ambush" to provide a -4 penalty to the targets attack on it's next turn.

Are dragon magazine articles going to receive the kind of support that other published material will receive (errata, FAQs etc)?

If damage type is not strictly tied to the power's keywords how does this affect resistances and vulnerabilities? Page 55 seems to indicate it's tied to the keyword, while page 276 mentions only damage type.

Thank You,

James
_______________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by squirloid
This is a two-part question, with the second question dependent on the answer to the first.

(A) Page 55 of the PHB strongly suggests that a spell which does damage of a given type also gains the keyword of that type. To whit: "For instance, a power that deals acid damage is an acid effect and thus has the acid keyword." Literally, if it deals acid damage then it gains the acid keyword. Is this a correct reading of this passage, and is the implication general (if a power deals x damage type, it gains the x keyword)?

(B) If A is not true, does that mean that a power which doesn't have the x keyword but deals x type damage isn't subject to vulnerability or immunity, as per the next paragraph: "Keywords help to determine how, or if, a power works when the target has resistance, vulnerability, or immunity to a damage type or an effect..."? This line of thought is continued in the subsequent paragraph, and strongly implies that resistance/immunity/et al. only look at the keywords to determine their effectiveness. So, hypothetically, if a power deals acid damage but does not have the Acid keyword, a creature who is immune to Acid still takes full damage from the power?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul@CustServe
Thank you for writing. That is true. If you look at the first level daily power of acid arrow, Acid is a keyword listed in the text.


___________________________
By Stardock
Question

if a power deals a certain type of damage does it have that keyword? For instance if a power deals fire damage does it have the fire keyword?

I'm trying to understand how keywords work in relation to damage types.

Answer

Greetings,

Even though powers that deal a particular type of damage will often have the appropriate keyword to that damage, it doesn't necessarily have to have that keyword. Thanks for contacting us.

Tony
Customer Service Representative

********************
Page Number: 55
Book Name: PHB 4E & Dragon 364 Class Acts


they answered
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James,

Thanks for the great feedback! We’ve passed this along to the good folks that make the games and hopefully we’ll see some errata covering this situation soon. Until then, it is up to your Dungeon Master to determine how he/she wants to handle this particular situation in their campaign.

I apologize for the inconvenience this has caused.

We would appreciate your feedback on the service we are providing you. Please click here to fill out a short questionnaire.

To login to your account, or update your question please click here.

Joe
Customer Service Representative
Wizards of the Coast
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I submitted a new question on this. I quoted both of the questions and answers in this thread in their entirity. I mentioned the Dragon Article as the relevant example. I pointer out the potential difference on how resistance and vulnerability work on page 55 and page 278 ... I tried to be very complete. There's no need to flood custserv with the same question ... I'll post as soon as I get the response.

EDIT: Personally the thing that really bugs me about squirrelloid's question is that in quoting acid arrow in the answer it call into doubt whether paul understood what he was asking.

I agree, that bugged me as well. But my question seems to be perfectly clear on what it was asking, and he basically told me that I was entirely correct.

I honestly hate asking questions specifically related to the items i'm directly interested in (in this case, the illusion powers), because I fear CustServe will give me a 'this is how those powers are intended to work' answer rather than a 'this is how the rules actually work', so I tend to ask more general questions in the hopes of getting clarification of the general mechanics which make the specific obvious, and keep the answering representatives biases out of it. I think a lot of the contrarian answers we get from CustServe are due to them deciding that something shouldn't work as per the general mechanic despite any rules to provide for an exception.

You'll notice my bolstering blood question meticulously avoided the subject of blood pulse, because I was afraid of the CustServe representative recoiling in horror and just saying "no, it doesn't work" without explanation. That the answer I received implies it shouldn't work as written (and there will be errata to fix it) was far less biased and still came to the same conclusion on intent, which honestly made me feel more comfortable with the answer.

As to the disconnect on resistance/immunity/etc... if keyword <==> damage type, then there is no conflict. Its only if damage type is independent of keyword that there's actually a conflict.
Evan T. (Wizard CSR) 19/06/2008
Can ranged attackers, eg. rogues and rangers, use cover (eg, walls, pillars) or concealment (eg. bushes, darkness) to make stealth attacks during combat?
You can make a stealth attempt with any action that you do. So, if you have cover or concealment, you can attempt to hide yourself as part of your attack. If you are successful, then you are given combat advantage against your opponents who can not see you.

Is it part of the design intention of 4E that players are encouraged to make use of tactics that can grant Combat Advantage, and using terrain to make stealth attacks is intended and encouraged by the rules?
This stealth system was implemented to make cover and concealment useful to players, and make the environment more interactive.

Edit: Further answer from Joe 19/06/2008
So the core question here that I would like to confirm is: each time a player attempts a stealth attack during combat (which could be each round for each stealther), the player's stealth check DC is:
a) the passive perception of their target (since this is the only monster they need to be hidden against)
b) an active perception roll for the target (requiring a roll from both player and DM, each turn)
c) the passive perception of all monsters in range, whether they're involved in this attack or not
d) the active perception checks of all monsters in range (requiring multiple rolls from the DM each turn)


The Stealth check is opposed by a Perception check from each observer. To gain combat advantage on the attack, the attacker only needs to succeed vs the target, though the DM can of course play around with this. Unless characters are actively being perceptive, use the passive value.
The DM will always make the final ruling on any issue that arises.
Seal of Binding doesn't prohibit ongoing damage or 'non-attack' damage
attack is apparently defined as 'anything involving a to-hit roll'
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When a power references the term "attack" (as a noun), what precisely is it referring to? Any function of a non-utility power? Anything requiring an attack roll? Any "Hit" text? Is damage from Wall of Ice an attack - even if it's incurred by the creature attacking the wall? (Ok, that last one seems kind of silly, doesn't it?)

Thank you for contacting us. All four different types of attacks are explained in detail on pages 270 -271 in the players handbook. If you have a question about a specific power let me know, and I'll be more than happy to help clarify it for you. Thank you!

It should at this point be noted that 270-271 basically defines 'an attack' as 'things involving an attack roll'. If there's no attack roll, its not an attack.

So when, for example, Seal of Binding makes the target immune to all other attacks, it is still susceptible to non-attack damaging effects (such as Wall of Fire or starting it's turn in the effect area of powers like Stinking Cloud), because that damage does not come from an attack?

Yes the target of Seal of Binding will still be susceptible to non-attack damaging effects such as starting a turn in an area effect power that is sustained or any ongoing damage they might have had from another attack prior to the seal of binding. I hope this helps!

Ive got a serious problem with the rules concerning psychic damage and powers that affect the mind. The target line of the powers should say: One living creature. It doesn't make sense to use certain Wizard and Warlock powers on construct and Undead (see confusion, Sleep, delusions of loyalty, whispers of the fey. Anyone else have a problem with this?
No I don't.

Though I recall that in the DMG items are assumed to be immune to poison, necrotic, and psychic damage. So maybe you could expand on that if you like.
Ive got a serious problem with the rules concerning psychic damage and powers that affect the mind. The target line of the powers should say: One living creature. It doesn't make sense to use certain Wizard and Warlock powers on construct and Undead (see confusion, Sleep, delusions of loyalty, whispers of the fey. Anyone else have a problem with this?

It could be argued that psychic powers and effects are more than simply messing with a living person's mind and more like magic insofar that they mess with the fabric of reality. So putting a skeleton to sleep is the psychic power interfering with necrotic energies binding the skeleton together. Thus it goes inanimate for a short time. Same could be said for constructs but it is messing with the magic that animates it, etc. It's not too far of a stretch considering we're dealing powers that warp reality and defy the norms of physics anyway!
What stops people from making this stuff up all by themselves? How do we know these are at all legit?

Simple, you can ask customer service yourself if you don't think the answer posted here is legit. WotC customer service has been great about getting back within 24 hours or less. So it's very easy to double check an answer you don't trust.
Kobold dragonshields can evade a charge attack by shifting away, but they can't fully evade someone who does a move action followed by a standard action

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Question:
Kobold Dragonshields have an immediate reaction ability that triggers when an enemy moves adjacent to them that lets the kobold shift 1 square.

The question that came up was this: if you charge a kobold dragonshield, and he shifts 1 square away from you when you move next to him, if you moved less than your speed can you move 1 more square to end your charge next to the kobold? Or does his shift end the charge because you had to declare your starting and ending point for your movement?

Similarly, if you use a move action to walk next to a kobold, and he shifts 1 square away, if you walked less than your speed can you walk one more square to end your move action next to him? Or would you have to declare your starting and ending points for your walk action beforehand?

Answer:
Thank you for contacting us. The answers to you questions are below.

1.) If you charge a kobold dragonshield, and he shifts 1 square away from you when you move next to him, if you moved less than your speed can you move 1 more square to end your charge next to the kobold? Or does his shift end the charge because you had to declare your starting and ending point for your movement?

-As per the rules of charge on page 287 and 288 in the Players Handbook, once you have charged you can take no other actions unless you spend an action point to take another action. In this situation when the Kobold Dragonshield Shifts away after you charged you would not be able to move again, even if you moved less than your speed. You could spend an action point to take a move action next to the Koblod after he has shifted away, but you would not be able to attack as well.

2.) Similarly, if you use a move action to walk next to a kobold, and he shifts 1 square away, if you walked less than your speed can you walk one more square to end your move action next to him? Or would you have to declare your starting and ending points for your walk action beforehand?

- Yes, If you use a move action to walk next to a Kobold Dragonshield and walked less than you speed, after he shifts away you can walk one more square to end your move action next to him.

I hope this information is useful.

Marc
Customer Service Representative
Wizards of the Coast
Ive got a serious problem with the rules concerning psychic damage and powers that affect the mind. The target line of the powers should say: One living creature. It doesn't make sense to use certain Wizard and Warlock powers on construct and Undead (see confusion, Sleep, delusions of loyalty, whispers of the fey. Anyone else have a problem with this?

The Monster Manual glossary definitions of the keywords for the creatures involved. The glossary explains in the definition when a certain type of creature is not considered "living" and whether they are immune to effects that target "living creatures". Specifically, the Construct (p. 281) and Undead (p.283) keywords in the glossary explain that constructs and undead are not living creatures and that spells and effects that specifically target living creatures have no effect against them.


Now that being said, I couldn't find any powers off-hand that specifically target living creatures. Sleep, for example, doesn't specify "living" creatures. It just targets "creatures". And while constructs and undead don't need to sleep, their keyword definitions don't say they are specifically immune to magical sleep effects. So undead and constructs can normally be affected by Sleep unless their specific monster entry says otherwise.

If you need an in-game explanation for why Sleep might work on an animated creature, simply say that these creatures, while not living, have been given the spark of sentience, which is still just enough for a spell caster to manipulate using psychic and illusion powers, etc. Therefore even though they don't normally go to sleep on their own, the potential to magically "flick the off switch" in their mind is there.
Ive got a serious problem with the rules concerning psychic damage and powers that affect the mind. The target line of the powers should say: One living creature. It doesn't make sense to use certain Wizard and Warlock powers on construct and Undead (see confusion, Sleep, delusions of loyalty, whispers of the fey. Anyone else have a problem with this?

You can do that if you like, but there was a very deliberate decision with 4E to reduce or remove that kind of blanket immunity. You'll notice that nothing is immune to Sneak Attacks, either.
You can do that if you like, but there was a very deliberate decision with 4E to reduce or remove that kind of blanket immunity. You'll notice that nothing is immune to Sneak Attacks, either.

To add on to this, just because something is 'mindless' doesn't mean it can't be affected by a psychic. Sure, it might be a different effect, but the Animus is as susceptible to mental attacks as the soul is.

[I really love that Animus stuff they came up with. Amazing. :D ]

And we finally have our first sticky! Hurrah!
Update for the first 30 posts of the thread. Will finish the rest in a couple hours when I get back home.

Feel free to steal this formatting for whatever you like, Underage_AOLer.

Debating with myself what to do with contradictory answers. We already have a couple. Current plan: I will put both answers in the list with a warning that there is a contradiction, and send a new e-mail to Customer Service containing both answers and ask for a clarification. If none is given, I will leave the contradiction in place.

I am going through the process of pairing down the word count. Many, many questions and answers will be paraphrased. We gamers are an extraordinarily verbose crowd, and posts do have character count limits. If neccessary, I'll try to expand the list, but that depends on mod power to insert posts into the middle of the thread.

Never expected a great response or a sticky, so sorry about the slow updates! I checked back the first couple days and saw little, then it 'sploded.
Kobold dragonshields can evade a charge attack by shifting away, but they can't fully evade someone who does a move action followed by a standard action

Show

Question:
Kobold Dragonshields have an immediate reaction ability that triggers when an enemy moves adjacent to them that lets the kobold shift 1 square.

The question that came up was this: if you charge a kobold dragonshield, and he shifts 1 square away from you when you move next to him, if you moved less than your speed can you move 1 more square to end your charge next to the kobold? Or does his shift end the charge because you had to declare your starting and ending point for your movement?

Similarly, if you use a move action to walk next to a kobold, and he shifts 1 square away, if you walked less than your speed can you walk one more square to end your move action next to him? Or would you have to declare your starting and ending points for your walk action beforehand?

Answer:
Thank you for contacting us. The answers to you questions are below.

1.) If you charge a kobold dragonshield, and he shifts 1 square away from you when you move next to him, if you moved less than your speed can you move 1 more square to end your charge next to the kobold? Or does his shift end the charge because you had to declare your starting and ending point for your movement?

-As per the rules of charge on page 287 and 288 in the Players Handbook, once you have charged you can take no other actions unless you spend an action point to take another action. In this situation when the Kobold Dragonshield Shifts away after you charged you would not be able to move again, even if you moved less than your speed. You could spend an action point to take a move action next to the Koblod after he has shifted away, but you would not be able to attack as well.

2.) Similarly, if you use a move action to walk next to a kobold, and he shifts 1 square away, if you walked less than your speed can you walk one more square to end your move action next to him? Or would you have to declare your starting and ending points for your walk action beforehand?

- Yes, If you use a move action to walk next to a Kobold Dragonshield and walked less than you speed, after he shifts away you can walk one more square to end your move action next to him.

I hope this information is useful.

Marc
Customer Service Representative
Wizards of the Coast

Hmmm... One thing interesting about his "part 1" reply is that it doesn't specify if the charge is completely resolved or not. Is that common sense yet or is the debate still on? Maybe someone would like to ask CustServ something like this:

a) Do attacks that include movement trigger the Kobold Dragonshield's Dragonshield Tactics ability?

i. e. if a rogue uses Deft Strike to move 2 squares and attack, does the Dragonshield shift once the rogue moves adjacent? Or, if someone charges a Dragonshield, does it shift one square before the attack roll is made?

b) If so, do you have the ability to continue the movement?

i. e. if the rogue moved 1 square, the Dragonshield shifts, can the rogue move another square and finish the attack? Similarly, if you charge less than your speed, can you charge another square and resolve the charge?
Here's a couple from me:
Question 1: Shifting is normally a move action, but what about powers that allow you to shift as part of that power's action? Example: Evasive Strike (Ranger Attack 1, PHB pg. 105) allows you to shift a particular number of squares before or after attacking as a standard action. Would the character still get a move action and use it to shift one more square?

Question 2: What about powers that allow you to shift, but don't list the type of action? Example: Weave Through the Fray (Ranger Utility 6, PHB pg. 108) allows you to shift a particular number of squares as an Immediate Interrupt. Would the character still get their full allotment of standard, move, and minor actions?

Answer:
If you shift as part of a power, that movement is part of the power. You can still take a normal move action if you have not already and only used a Standard action for the power.

Weave Through the Fray is an Immediate interrupt. It does not require an action, and cannot normally be performed on your turn.

Good Gaming!

Holy Salma Hayek!
Holy Salma Hayek!

best cha-based pally evar
Okay it seems a lot of you are okay with throwing everything we learned from 3e out the window and starting fresh. We seem to have no complaints with "mind affecting" powers working on the mindless (oozes, construct, plants, etc). The idea of sleep effects disrupting the magic that animates an undead and thus works on them, okay, but what about psionics. Are we really going to wait up to a year for real psionics only to find a psion has mind-affecting powers that work on the mindless. Wouldn't it be better if the psion had some powers that only affect living creatures, but are more powerful than the equal level powers of non-psionicists?
And here's another thought. Why does a wyrmling dragon and an ancient dragon wave the same size breath weapon. All dragons of all colors and sizes have the same size breath, blast 5. I looked through the MM and found only one creature with a larger blast, the dracolich, blast 20. What makes the dracolich so special? Shouldn't an ancient red dragon have a blast 20 also? Wyrmlings 5, juvenile 10, adult 15, ancient 20, or something?
Talaxar please start a new thread to discuss these issues. It would be nice if this thread remained a place for custserv answers
Hmmm... One thing interesting about his "part 1" reply is that it doesn't specify if the charge is completely resolved or not. Is that common sense yet or is the debate still on?

His answer to part 1 means that the movement portion of the charge action is ended once you reach the destination square you declared at the start of the charge. Note that unlike a walk action, where you can move 1 square at a time and change your mind where you're walking as you go, with a charge you must charge to a specific spot that is chosen when you start the charge (ie the closest square to the enemy at that instant). When you reach that spot you can not continue moving, and if the target enemy is still next to you at that point you get to make a free basic melee attack on them. If he's not next to you, though, you lose the free attack.


a) Do attacks that include movement trigger the Kobold Dragonshield's Dragonshield Tactics ability?

i. e. if a rogue uses Deft Strike to move 2 squares and attack, does the Dragonshield shift once the rogue moves adjacent? Or, if someone charges a Dragonshield, does it shift one square before the attack roll is made?

No customer service necessary. If a power includes non-forced movement then it triggers immediate effects and opportunity attacks just like walking.

b) If so, do you have the ability to continue the movement?

i. e. if the rogue moved 1 square, the Dragonshield shifts, can the rogue move another square and finish the attack? Similarly, if you charge less than your speed, can you charge another square and resolve the charge?

Yes, because the rogue does not have to declare both of his squares of movement at the start of the action. (Notice that the power doesn't say you have to move to a specific square, just that you get to move two squares of your choice.) So if the rogue using Deft Strike moves one square next to a Dragonshield, and the kobold interrupts and shifts away one square, then the rogue can continue moving the remaining square next to the kobold (or even a different square if he prefers.)
Minions gain the full benefit of temporary hit points
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Question:
If a minion gains temporary hit points are they still killed if they take any damage, even if the damage is less than the temporary hit points? For example, if a minion gains 5 temporary hit points from an allied leader, and the minion is hit by an attack that only does 3 damage, is the minion dead or is he still alive with 2 temporary hit points left?

Answer:
Minions gain the benefits of temporary hit points just like any other creature. PCs will need to do enough damage to them to take out the temp HP first, then their single normal point. Once your players know which monsters are the minions and they start not dropping from a single point of damage, it'll really shake them up!

Cody
Customer Service Representative
Wizards of the Coast
Fleeting Ghost, p119, says you can move & make a stealth check.

Does this mean that use of this power allows the rogue to ignore the normal rule that moving through open space during combat negates stealth, and allow them to make a stealth attack immediately after moving, while in plain view?

Or does the rogue have to end their turn in concealment/cover for the stealth check to be valid?

I want to be sure I'm reading this power correctly.


This ability allows you to move at your full speed and not take a penalty to your stealth check, as described on page 188. All other rules for stealth, cover, and concealment still apply.
-Charles Customer Service Representative 06/22/2008

Incidentally, CSRs work on Sunday!
Is MARKED different than CURSED?

Players Handbook 4e
For purposes of the Half Elf Dilittante (pg 42) racial feature and Multiclass Feats (pg 209), is there a difference between Marked and Cursed?
For example, a Half Elf Warlock selects Enfeebling Strike (pg 92) as his/her encounter power. Enfeebling Strike reads "If you marked the target, it takes a -2 penalty to attack rolls ...". Given that a Warlock "Curses" instead of "Marks", would a Warlock's Curse fulfill the "If you marked the target" requirement?
NOTE: Enfeebling Strike IS an attack power, per the 6/10/08 PH Update.

Marking and Cursing a target mean different things, and are not interchangeable for different power's effects.
Rob, Customer Service Representative, 06/20/2008 10:24 AM
A CSR contracdicting themselves in the same answer:
The power reads "Strength bonus". That means no additional damage added from other feats, racial benefits, spells, or powers.

For example, a Dwarf fighter with an 18 strength hits with his Axe and does 1[W] + 6 and the adjacent opponent takes 4 damage for his strength modifier.
...
4E reads very literally and when the book stays Strength modifier, it really means Strength modifier only!

So the Dwarven Fighter with 18 Str. hits with Cleave, which does 1[W]+ Strength modifer damage, the example given gives a +2 bonus to Strength modifier damage in the initial attack, but "when the book says Str modifier it really means Str modifer only", which means the other bonus to damage should not be applied anywhere in the Hit field...
Hmmm... One thing interesting about his "part 1" reply is that it doesn't specify if the charge is completely resolved or not. Is that common sense yet or is the debate still on? Maybe someone would like to ask CustServ something like this:

a) Do attacks that include movement trigger the Kobold Dragonshield's Dragonshield Tactics ability?

i. e. if a rogue uses Deft Strike to move 2 squares and attack, does the Dragonshield shift once the rogue moves adjacent? Or, if someone charges a Dragonshield, does it shift one square before the attack roll is made?

At first I thought it worked that way. A Charge is a single action in which part of it is move and the other part is the attack. Dragonshield Tactics is a reaction, which is takes effect after the triggering action is completed. That seems clear enough, you resolve the charge, then the shift occurs.

However, in the section on Readied Actions, which are also Immediate Reactions like Dragonshield Tactics; they specifically mention powers that combine movement and an attack. If the trigger is an enemy attack, the enemy attack occurs then your action happens. If the trigger is enemy movement, you perform your readied action before the enemy attack happens. And note that any player can do the exact same thing by using a standard action to ready a shift.

b) If so, do you have the ability to continue the movement?

i. e. if the rogue moved 1 square, the Dragonshield shifts, can the rogue move another square and finish the attack? Similarly, if you charge less than your speed, can you charge another square and resolve the charge?

According to a CustServ reply listed earlier, not for a charge.

In actual play this isn't really a big deal. Dragonshields that keep running from your defenders are just going to be gunned down by strikers and controllers anyway.
A CSR contracdicting themselves in the same answer:


So the Dwarven Fighter with 18 Str. hits with Cleave, which does 1[W]+ Strength modifer damage, the example given gives a +2 bonus to Strength modifier damage in the initial attack, but "when the book says Str modifier it really means Str modifer only", which means the other bonus to damage should not be applied anywhere in the Hit field...

"Some powers add modifiers to attack rolls or damage rolls. These modifiers apply to any roll of the dice, but not to ongoing damage or other static nonvariable effects." - Players Hand Book

So a Dwarven Fighter with an 18 Str and Dwarven Weapon Training does 1[W] + Str Modifier of 4 + Feat Bonus of 2 for a total of 1[W] + 6. However the secondary target of Cleave takes Strength Modifier damage, which as a static damage effect that doesn't involve a die roll isn't affected by any modifiers to damage from Feats, Magic Weapons, Critical Hit effects or any other source.
A CSR contracdicting themselves in the same answer:


So the Dwarven Fighter with 18 Str. hits with Cleave, which does 1[W]+ Strength modifer damage, the example given gives a +2 bonus to Strength modifier damage in the initial attack, but "when the book says Str modifier it really means Str modifer only", which means the other bonus to damage should not be applied anywhere in the Hit field...

You misread the quote; the CSR didn't contradict themselves.

The quote you're talking about was in reference to whether the Dwarven Weapon Training feat added +2 damage to the static damage of a miss result on Cleave. The CSR is saying that since the miss result only says "Strength modifier" you shouldn't apply anything to that involving damage rolls. Since the feat in question adds only to weapon damage rolls, and the miss result only has a Strength modifier and not a [W] symbol, the feat does not apply to the miss result of Cleave. The hit result of Cleave does include a damage roll in the form of [W], and so the +2 does apply on a Cleave hit.

So the CSR's answer makes sense. You just misunderstood what they said.
No, the CSR used poor language describing his answer.
when the book says Str modifier it really means Str modifer only

is in direct conflict with 1[W] + Strength Modifier damage (+feat damage+enhancement damage+etc.) (which is clearly stated on PHB 276)

The Hit field ONLY specifies Strength modifier (ability modifier) so the CSR is saying to ignore PHB 276. The correct answer is that the secondary effect of Cleave is not an attack roll, so you only add the stated modifier damage. (since additional effects only occur on a damage roll)

The ruling is correct, the wording of the ruling is horrible. There is very little "wiggle room" when when one states
when the book says Str modifier it really means Str modifer only

.
2 questions:
The crawl action implies that it is the only horizontal movement action while Prone but doesn't state it. Can we get a clarification that the only legal move actions while prone are Shift, Crawl, Stand Up, and Teleport?

Do temporary hit points from the same source stack, once and for all?
No, the CSR used poor language describing his answer....

...The correct answer is that the secondary effect of Cleave is not an attack roll, so you only add the stated modifier damage. (since additional effects only occur on a damage roll)

The ruling is correct, the wording of the ruling is horrible. There is very little "wiggle room" when when one states
.

The important thing here is that you, I and the customer service rep all agree on the ruling, namely that you don't add Dwarven Weapon Training's +2 damage to non-die roll damages. I knew what he meant, you knew what he meant, and he knew what he meant, so arguing about whether or not the exact wording of his answer could be improved is getting way off-topic.
Temporary hitpoints don't stack, ever.
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Question:
I'm confused by the wording on p.294 regarding the stacking of temporary hit points. It says that temporary hit points "from different sources" do not stack. What does that phrase "from different sources" mean?

Or to put it another way, do temporary hit points ever stack? If so, can you provide a specific example of when they do stack?

Answer:
Temporary hitpoints don't stack, ever.

Evan T.
Customer Service Representative
Wizards of the Coast

Multiclass Powers Stack With Half-Elf Dilettante

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Question: Does a Multiclass encounter power stack with a Half-Elf's Dilettante power?

For example, a Half-Elf selects Eyebite as his Dilettante power then takes Pact Initiate multiclass feat and selects Fey Pact which grants Eyebite as an encounter power.

Can the above Half-Elf use Eyebite once or twice per encounter?



Answer: Yes, the Half-Elf can now use Eyebite twice per encounter.

Good Gaming!

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Joe
Customer Service Representative
Wizards of the Coast
Do you have the time stamp and the person who gave the answer? I've seen previous answers where they thought there might be a chance it was in error and am curious if this is a newer response or just a different person.

06/13/2008 01:38 PM, Cody.
My question:
Customer (Mark Dey) 06/24/2008 05:55 AM
Greetings! I had a few questions for you on the Sleep spell.

This spell, in the best case for the Wizard, renders the target unconscious. Is the target succeeding on a save the only thing that can remove the unconsciousness? If not, what else can remove the unconcious condition?

Also, are there any creatures that are immune to the Sleep spell? (Elves, Eladrin, Undead, Constructs, etc. ?)

Thanks in advance for your answers. I have a game tomight at 5pm, so it would be helpful to get an answer by then.

-Mark

********************
Page Number: 160
Book Name: Players Handbook

Their response:

Mark,

Thank you for writing.

1. That is correct. Making your saving throw is the only way to remove the unconscious condition.

2. To check if any creatures are immune to Sleep, check the key words for Sleep against any of that creatures immunities.

Good Gaming!


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Paul
Customer Service Representative
Wizards of the Coast
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Critical Hits

I asked:
According to pg 278 in the PHB it states: Maximum Damage: Rather than roll damage,determine the maximum damage you can roll with your attack.

Does this mean that there is no damage roll as prescribed on pg 276?

Does this mean no die are considered rolled?


They said:
Response (Support Agent)06/24/2008 05:24 PM

All the damage you would have dealt if the attack was not critical hit is dealt and all dice rolls are considered to be the maximum possible roll, then you roll any damage that is triggered because you rolled a critical hit like that from a magic weapon.

Please let me know if you have any further questions.


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Chuck

Q: Do Clerics get their Ritual Book for free?

A: Yes, Clerics get their Ritual Book for free.

(Evan T., Customer Service Representative)
Q: Do Clerics get their Ritual Book for free?

A: Yes, Clerics get their Ritual Book for free.

(Evan T., Customer Service Representative)

And that answer also implies that wizards get their spellbook for free too.
Look what I found in my mailbox!
Dear Customer Service,

Can my Ranger throw two handaxes simultaneously via the Twin Strike power? The power text seems to imply it only works with a single ranged weapon or two melee weapons.

Handaxes ARE considered melee weapons so I guess it qualifies, but I want to know if I can THROW them with the power. Also, what about other thrown weapons that are not considered melee weapons, such as shuriken? Can I throw a pair of shuriken with this power?

There are other two-weapon ranger powers that seem to only work with a single ranged weapon as well. Was it really the intent of the designers to gimp the ranged thrower archetype? Or was it just an oversight in the wording?

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,
Juddson S. Ivines
aka RavingDork
aka Raven Dark

Juddson,

You can throw them both, the power does not limit you to one weapon. Or, you could use the same magic weapon twice.

Please write us back if you require any further assistance.


We would appreciate your feedback on the service we are providing you. Please click here to fill out a short questionnaire.

To login to your account, or update your question please click here.

Evan T.
Customer Service Representative
Wizards of the Coast
1-800-324-6496 (US and Canada)
425-204-8069 (From all other countries)
Monday-Friday 9am-6pm PST / 12pm-9pm EST

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From Joe, the best CS rep of all:

Ranger powers such as Twin Strike list as requirements "two melee weapons or a RANGED weapon". The weapon table on p219 appears to listed Ranged Weapons as a particular set, and heavy thrown weapons (hand axes, javalins) aren't part of that list. Can heavy thrown weapons or light thrown weapons be validly used as part of ranged Ranger powers? Do thrown weapons qualify as "Ranged Weapons" wherever that keyword is listed, despite not falling under that category in the weapon table?

Throwing weapons are not ranged weapons, they are melee weapons that can be thrown. Though the Thrown weapon property does not specifically say so, these weapons may be used in ranged attacks as well as melee attacks.

Rogue area attack powers such as Blinding Barrage work with the crossbow, sling, or light thrown weapons. Sling and hand crossbow are "Load Free". Normal crossbow is not. p217 says "If a power allows you to hit multiple targets, the additional load time is accounted for in the power." This doesn't appear to apply to light throwing weapons. If shuriken or daggers are used with Blinding Barrage, are they limited by the requirement to use a minor action to draw each item, making Quick Draw a necessity to use these items with this type of power?

If you are using a Magic throwing weapon, it will hit all the targets and return to your hand (yeah Magic is that awesome). If you are using mundane throwing weapons, you will need one for each attack roll made and you will need three [sic] Quick draw feat to be able to draw and use them all.
-Joe, Wizards CSR, 06/25/2008
If you are using a Magic throwing weapon, it will hit all the targets and return to your hand (yeah Magic is that awesome). If you are using mundane throwing weapons, you will need one for each attack roll made and you will need three Quick draw feat to be able to draw and use them all.
-Joe, Wizards CSR, 06/25/2008

"Three" quick draw feats? I assume he meant "the"
Useful Star Wars Saga Links
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