Becoming a lich

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Looks like this has been made canon...

On Friday there will be an Epic Destiny preview from Arcane Power called the Archlich. Whether this means a Baelnorn that isn't necessarily Elven, but still not evil, or something else, we'll see.

But it means that now Wizards are letting you play Liches (albeit, Epic ones) in the official rules.

Was just about to say the same thing


Friday 04/10: A look at a new epic destiny -- the archlich!


There you go...that will be all.
Rule (1) of Roleplaying: There is always a player who wants to be a werewolf / vampire / lich / demon / dragon.

Rule (2) of Roleplaying: If they get their way, no good will ever come of it.

Rule (3) of Roleplaying: They will tell the story of it the rest of their life, and every time they do, they will start the story with, "So, in this one game, I tricked my DM into letting me be a..." and they will end the story with, "... and so the game was pretty stupid after that, but how cool was my character?"

So do these rules apply to 3e Kobold Monk/Drunken Masters... cuz mine was friggin' awesomesauce!!
While this doesn't necessarily pertain to the topic at hand, this thread has reminded me that sometimes, having a PC turned over to DM as an NPC can be a desirable event...

I was running a 3.5e campaign not too long ago, in which one of the players had a pathological hatred of arcane magic users (toward the end of the campaign he was a fighter with levesl in Corrupt Avenger from Tome of Horrors and Occult Slayer from Complete Arcane). The back story was that this character was a member of the local militia, and his whole village, including his family, was destroyed by an insane wizard.

As this character was developed through role-playing, this hatred started becoming more and more severe, with this character first concentrating on any obvious spellcasters in a given encounter, to deep paranoid distrust of any of any character (including fellow PCs) that was even expected of consorting with arcane casters (to mention nothing of the tension between himself and the parties wizard).

This PCs methods became more and more extreme, and despite the fact that I would frequently warn him that he was in danger of a change to an evil alignment, he continued with his actions because logically, this is what his character would do. The final straw came when, while negotiating with a wizards guild in a large city, the PC got into an altercation with an NPC, and proceeded to strike down several apprentice wizards and members of the city guard.

At this point, I informed him that his character was now officially evil, and that he would have to relinquish it as an NPC; which, surpirisingly enough, the player did with much grace and understanding...

The point to this story being that this PC became an excellent NPC villain for the party. The final encounter with this former PC ended up being very emotional and poignant for all the PCs (there was even a part of the encounter where the parties paladin attempted to redeem the villain and begged for him to turn himself in and answer for his crimes). Later on, at epic levels, this villain made a return in the form of a death knight, for yet another memorable encounter for the PCs.

I guess the point here is that as long as players understand the consequences of their actions and are willing to accept them, allow them to do what they wish. Maybe this isn't the case with every gaming group, but I've found that even an undesirable event (such as a PC becoming a lich and an NPC villain), can be turned into a rich and rewarding role-playing experience.
sometimes, having a PC turned over to DM as an NPC can be a desirable event...

Agreed. Seeing an old PC crop up later as a villain can viewed as homage, and sometimes the player's whole goal is to portray a credible path towards such NPC-ness.

Speaking of odd goals (off-topic anecdote): while playing a (cheerful) paladin of Wee-Jas, my character's main goal was merely to be killed... which took far longer than expected.
hey iv noticed a lot of people have been saying that liches are just straight forward evil no matter what. while i dnt know about the rules about it in d&d in the lore it simply say that only a very evil soccer would chose to become one. which might mean that a good person could become one and possibly hang on to the goodness in them; of course they would more than likely go mad either from never being able to die or some form of corruption from the orginal transformation. just a thought.
hey iv noticed a lot of people have been saying that liches are just straight forward evil no matter what. while i dnt know about the rules about it in d&d in the lore it simply say that only a very evil soccer would chose to become one. which might mean that a good person could become one and possibly hang on to the goodness in them; of course they would more than likely go mad either from never being able to die or some form of corruption from the orginal transformation. just a thought.



Well, yes, any sapient, free-willed being is capable of choosing its own path.  This seems obvious.

Speaking of liches, nice thread necromancy.  Nine years.
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